What Is The Cause of Low Voltage (Unreadable or Unclassified) AliveCor/Kardia Mobile ECG Recordings?

The skeptical cardiologist has had several of his readers submit stories and tracings of AliveCor Mobile ECG recordings which yield unclassified or unreadable recordings. In some cases this is due to excess noise but a lot of these tracings suffer from low voltage: the height of the tracing is very small.

John, a skepcard reader, is typical.

Recently, he noted his heart was racing and made an AliveCor recording which came back interpreted by the app as normal

EKG-3
First tracing. Note the QRS complex (the large regular spikes) are 2 boxes high. Right in front of them is a little bump, the p wave indicating normal sinus rhythm

 

Three hours later he made a second recording which has drastically lower voltage: the only deflections visible are tiny QRS complexes, the p waves have disappeared. I think this is also normal sinus rhythm but because p waves can’t be seen this came back uninterpretable and if there were any irregularity AliveCor would have called it atrial fibrillation:

EKG-4
Second tracing. Note the QRS spikes now are less than half of a box tall. There are no consistent p waves visible (unless one has a good imagination). The bumps after QRS spikes are T waves.

John has a theory on the cause of some of his low voltage recordings which I shall reveal in a subsequent post after testing it.

In the meantime, if any readers have suggestions as to causes of low voltage recordings or have noted similar issues please comment below or send recordings and observations to DRP@theskepticalcardiologist.com.

Voltagophilistically Yours,

-ACP

 

 

 

 

8 thoughts on “What Is The Cause of Low Voltage (Unreadable or Unclassified) AliveCor/Kardia Mobile ECG Recordings?”

  1. Hele dr. P.

    ever tried to use two Alivecor devices nearby each other … guess what !
    Specific high frequency noise might also interfere, whilst an obstructed microphone and damaged electrodes could have an effect on signal quality …

    The skeptical Biomedical Engineer

  2. I have had readings that had low amplitude, albeit not as pronounced as this. I believe a contributing factor is whether or not the hands (and electrodes) are clean, as well as how wet or dry your hands are. I try to thoroughly wash my hands and wipe the electrodes (preferably with an alcohol wipe) prior to use. I have seen increases in amplitude after doing this.

  3. I have the same issue: frequently my Kardia readings have extremely low voltage; it seems to be mostly (but not always) in the morning. I can’t tell if it’s a real (physical) issue or just measurement error. It’s very frustrating.

  4. I have tested myself, and hundreds of other people. I have a low-voltage heart every single test that I have taken. Almost flat line. My pulse rate is generally between 50 and 60. I would like to find out the reason for this. If anyone could learn some invites it would be greatly appreciated!

    1. I’m in the process of compiling my thoughts on this issue after receiving feedback and doing some experimentation.
      Have you tried putting the device directly on your left chest or using the hand/knee approach? It is a bit cumbersome but the chest recordings are typically better with larger voltage than the standard arm/arm recordings.
      Although one reader felt position (lying/sitting) varied the voltage this doesn’t seem consistent.
      On reader commented that time of day effected recordings, another that hand dryness did.
      I haven’t found that to be a consistent cause of altered voltage.

      1. I have tested myself in various positions. With my hands on my knees, on a bench, etc. I’ve done the same for many of my clients in my personal training studio. My test always comes back almost flatlined. My ECG voltage is very very low. I am currently 5’5″ at 111 lbs. so I don’t think it is related to being overweight. I really appreciate any help! Thanks!

  5. I take my readings every single day. I have a low voltage reading every day, sometimes almost flatlined. I too have been researching for months to find out why this is. I’m thinking it could be Amyloidosis or some other form of myocardiopathy.

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