All posts by Dr. AnthonyP

Cardiologist, blogger, musician

Why We Need To Replace Hippocrates’ Oath And Apocryphal Trope

The skeptical cardiologist has never liked the Hippocratic Oath and so was quite pleased to read that it is gradually being replaced by more appropriate oaths with many medical graduates taking an excellent pledge created by the World Medical Association.

Here’s the first line of the Hippocratic Oath

Asclepius with his serpent-entwined staff, Archaeological Museum of Epidaurus

I swear by Apollo the Healer, by Asclepius, by Hygieia, by Panacea, and by all the gods and goddesses, making them my witnesses, that I will carry out, according to my ability and judgment, this oath and this indenture.

Much as I enjoy the ribald hi jinx of the gods and goddesses in Greek mythology and appreciate the back story behind words like panacea and hygiene* I just don’t feel it is appropriate to swear an oath to mythical super beings.

Let Food Be Thy Medicine-The Apocryphal Hippocratic Trope

Hippocrates is often cited these days in alternative medicine circles because he is alleged to have said “let food be thy medicine and medicine thy food.”

I’ve come across two articles that are well worth reading on the food=medicine trope which is often used by snake oil salesmen to justify their useless (presumably food-based) supplements.

The first , entitled “Hey, Hippocrates: Food isn’t medicine. It’s just food” comes from  Dylan Mckay, a nutritional biochemist at the Richardson Centre for Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals, He writes:

Food is so much more than medicine. Food is intrinsically related to human social interactions and community. Food is culture, love, and joy. Turning food into medicine robs it of these positive attributes.

A healthy relationship with food is essential to a person’s well-being, but not because it has medicinal properties. Food is not just fuel and it is more than nutrients — and we don’t consume it just to reduce our disease risk.

Seeing food as a medicine can contribute to obsessing about macronutrientintake, to unfairly canonizing or demonizing certain foods, and to turning eating into a joyless and stressful process.

People tend to overvalue the immediate impact of what they eat, thinking that a “super food” can have instant benefits while undervaluing the long-term effects of what they consume over their lifetime.

The Appeal to Antiquity

The second article is from the always excellent David Gorski at Science-based Medicine entitled let-food-be-thy-medicine-and-medicine-be-thy-food-the-fetishism-of-medicinal-foods.

Gorski notes that just because Hippocrates is considered by some to be the “father of medicine” and his ideas are ancient doesn’t make them correct:

one of the best examples out there of the logical fallacy known as the appeal to antiquity; in other words, the claim that if something is ancient and still around it must be correct (or at least there must be something to it worth considering).

Of course, just because an idea is old doesn’t mean it’s good, any more than just because Hippocrates said it means it must be true. Hippocrates was an important figure in the history of medicine because he was among the earliest to assert that diseases were caused by natural processes rather than the gods and because of his emphasis on the careful observation and documentation of patient history and physical findings, which led to the discovery of physical signs associated with diseases of specific organs. However, let’s not also forget that Hippocrates and his followers also believed in humoral theory, the idea that all disease results from an imbalance of the “four humors.” It’s also amusing to note that this quote by Hippocrates is thought to be a misquote, as it is nowhere to be found in the more than 60 texts known as The Hippocratic Corpus (Corpus Hippocraticum).

Gorski goes on to point out that:

this ancient idea that virtually all disease could be treated with diet, however much or little it was embraced by Hippocrates, has become an idée fixe in alternative medicine, so much so that it leads its proponents twist new science (like epigenetics) to try to fit it into a framework where diet rules all, often coupled with the idea that doctors don’t understand or care about nutrition and it’s big pharma that’s preventing the acceptance of dietary interventions. That thinking also permeates popular culture, fitting in very nicely with an equally ancient phenomenon, the moralization of food choices (discussed ably by Dr. Jones a month ago


We’ve learned a lot about medicine and nutrition in the last 3 thousand years. We can thank Hippocrates, perhaps, for the idea that diseases don’t come from the gods but little else.

It’s time to upgrade the physician pledge  and jettison the antiquated Hippocratic Oath.

We now have real, effective medicines that have nothing to do with food for many diseases. It’s important to eat a healthy diet.

But the food=medicine trope is just too often a  marker for pseudo and anti-science humbuggery and should also be left behind.

Hygienically Yours,

-ACP

*From Wikipedia, an explanation of the Gods and Goddesses mentioned in the Hippocratic oath

Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts; his daughters are Hygieia(“Hygiene”, the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation), Iaso (the goddess of recuperation from illness), Aceso(the goddess of the healing process), Aglæa/Ægle (the goddess of the glow of good health), and Panacea (the goddess of universal remedy).


The Physician’s Pledge

  • Adopted by the 2nd General Assembly of the World Medical Association, Geneva, Switzerland, September 1948
    and amended by the 22nd World Medical Assembly, Sydney, Australia, August 1968
    and the 35th World Medical Assembly, Venice, Italy, October 1983
    and the 46th WMA General Assembly, Stockholm, Sweden, September 1994
    and editorially revised by the 170th WMA Council Session, Divonne-les-Bains, France, May 2005
    and the 173rd WMA Council Session, Divonne-les-Bains, France, May 2006
    and the WMA General Assembly, Chicago, United States, October 2017

  • AS A MEMBER OF THE MEDICAL PROFESSION:

  • I SOLEMNLY PLEDGE to dedicate my life to the service of humanity;

  • THE HEALTH AND WELL-BEING OF MY PATIENT will be my first consideration;

  • I WILL RESPECT the autonomy and dignity of my patient;

  • I WILL MAINTAIN the utmost respect for human life;

  • I WILL NOT PERMIT considerations of age, disease or disability, creed, ethnic origin, gender, nationality, political affiliation, race, sexual orientation, social standing, or any other factor to intervene between my duty and my patient;

  • I WILL RESPECT the secrets that are confided in me, even after the patient has died;

  • I WILL PRACTISE my profession with conscience and dignity and in accordance with good medical practice;

  • I WILL FOSTER the honour and noble traditions of the medical profession;

  • I WILL GIVE to my teachers, colleagues, and students the respect and gratitude that is their due;

  • I WILL SHARE my medical knowledge for the benefit of the patient and the advancement of healthcare;

  • I WILL ATTEND TO my own health, well-being, and abilities in order to provide care of the highest standard;

  • I WILL NOT USE my medical knowledge to violate human rights and civil liberties, even under threat;

  • I MAKE THESE PROMISES solemnly, freely, and upon my honour.

 

 

One Question On A Borderline Stress Test and One Comment About Me , Gundry And BIG PHARMA

A reader asks me the following question:

I’m 35 years old male and was positive for myocardial ischemia during stress test. The cardiologist said that my result was borderline. I’m not sure what does he meant by “borderline”. Also does it help if I do CAC score since my stress test already came out with positive MI?

Good questions.

First off, to understand what any stress test means we have to know the pre-test probability of disease. For example, in 35 year old males without chest pain the likelihood of any significantly blocked coronary artery is very low. This means that the vast majority of positive or borderline tests in this group are false positives, meaning the test is abnormal but there is no disease.

Even if we add exertional chest pain into the mix the probability of a tightly blocked coronary in a 35 year year old is incredibly low (but there are some congenital coronary anomalies that occur.)

The accuracy of stress tests varies depending on the type. The standard treadmill stress test with ECG monitoring is about 70% sensitive  and 70% specific. Adding on a nuclear imaging component improves the sensitivity (it makes it more likely we will pick up a blockage if it is present) to about 85% however, in the real world, the specificity (chance of a false positive) is still quite high. Accuracy varies a lot depending on how good the study is and how good the reader is.

Borderline for either the stress ECG the stress nuclear (or stress echo) means that the test wasn’t clearly abnormal but it wasn’t clearly normal. It is in a grey zone of uncertainty.

Given your low pre-test probability of disease it is highly likely your “borderline” test result is a false positive. Whether anything else needs to be done at this point depends on many factors (some from the stress test)  but most importantly, the nature of the symptoms that prompted the investigation in the first place.

If there are no symptoms and  you went for more than 9 minutes on the treadmill likely nothing needs to be done.

Would a coronary calcium scan add anything?

A very high score (>let’s say 100 for age 35) would raise substantial concerns that you have a coronary blockage.

A zero score would be expected in your age group and probably wouldn’t change recommendations .

A score of 1 up to let’s say 100  means you have a built up a lot more plaque than normal and should look at aggressive modification of risk factors but likely wouldn’t change other recommendations.

So the CAC might be helpful but most likely it would be a zero and not helpful.

A Nasty Comment.

The skeptical cardiologist gets lots of nasty comments about his post on the bad science behind Dr. Esselstyn’s diet and another post on the totally bogus Plant Paradox book/diet by Stephen Gundry. I don’t think Esselstyn is a quack but he pretends that there is scientific support for his wacky diet when all he has is anecdotes.

With Gundry, on the other hand, there is a strong smell of quackery.

With this new book he’s developed a line of ridiculous foods that he’s approved.

Gundry will sell you a 75$  piece of chocolate with resveratrol added to it. Despite the multiple health claims for this antioxidant (found in red wine) there are no proven health benefits.

 

Snake oil and supplements abound in all of his presentations and there is much promotion of useless expensive skincare products and  foods that only he sells.

I’m thinking of  adding promotion of special, super-charged olive oil to the red flags of quackery.

There’s no health  reason to get extra-virgin olive oil adulterated with anything. Just make sure you are actually getting EVOO.


Here’s one of Gundry’s supporters comments.

Thank you for your opinion and that’s exactly what it is YOUR OPINION. I suggest you try the Plant Paradox. You sound like someone from a pharmaceutical company. Why don’t you write about how BIG PHARMA is deceiving the public along with how they are keeping people sick.

People who leave nasty comments on my blog typically don’t identify themselves. I can’t tell if this is an authentic comment or someone paid by Gundry’s vast snake oil empire.

They really like using ALL CAPs.

And they like to accuse me of being from BIG PHARMA or in the pay of BIG PHARMA.

BIG PHARMA and I, apparently, have the goal of misleading the populace about the benefits of Gundry’s BS diet and useless supplements so that they will remain sick and require drugs that  gain us huge profits.

I’m still waiting for the checks from BIG PHARMA to roll in. In the meantime I am scrupulously avoiding lunch with pharmaceutical reps and drug/device sponsored boondoggles.

Pharmalargically Yours,

-ACP

N.B. If you’d like to see how much money BIG PHARMA is paying me (or any doctor) you can go to the Dollars for Docs website run by Pro Publica here.

What John Mandrola Learned About Aspirin in Munich

The skeptical cardiologist did not get to travel to Munich to attend the recent European Society of Cardiology meetings but the electrophysiologist, John Mandrola did. He summarized two big trials which showed no benefit of aspirin in the primary prevention of cardiac disease, one in patients with diabetes and one in patients with moderate risk in Ten Things I Learned About Aspirin at ESC

Of note, the lack of benefit in these studies is partially related to a much lower rate of events than predicted from standard risk models.

Why? Mandrola notes:

“societal efforts, such as lower rates of smoking and removal of trans-fats from the food supply, have led to a heart-healthier environment. In addition, greater use of preventive therapies—statins and antihypertensive meds, for instance—have also contributed to lower rates of cardiac disease. These developments increase the difficulty of running trials for primary prevention but are decidedly good news for patients.”

Similar to the ASPREE study, aspirin did not show any benefit in reducing GI cancer in these two large studies.

So aspirin may be less effective than it was decades ago because we have done a good job overall of reducing the risk of heart attack and stroke.

acetylsalicylic ally Yours,

-ACP

h/t Reader Francis

Wednesday’s Sick Notes

In the course of researching some (likely obscure) phenomenon the skeptical cardiologist encountered  a reference to a book with the fascinating title of “Fritz Spiegl’s SICK NOTES: An Alphabetical Browsing-Book of Medical Derivations, Abbreviations, Mnemonics and Slang for the Amusement and Edification of Medics, Nurses, Patients and Hypochondriacs.”

The book is no longer in print but I was able to purchase a used version for less than 10$ via the wonders of the internet.

Published in 1996 with a forward by Lord Smith of Marlow, the President of the Royal College of Surgeons, the book is most enjoyable, quite suited to short bursts of reading.

From time to time I will share random selections, most likely on a Wednesday.

Without further ado I give you today’s tidbit- the pancreas.

The name of the digestive gland comes from the Greek pan, all + areas, flesh; or so all the dictionaries tell us. It is actually fish-shaped, and the all-flesh connection is puzzling, as surely all our soft giblets-human as well as animal-are ‘all flesh”.

Could there be a connection with Latin panis, bread, in view of the fact that the pancreas of lambs, calves, etc. when used in cooking, are called sweetbread(s)-although the pancreas is, of course, neither sweet nor bread?

Further etymological investigation seems called for. The pancreas also contain small groups of cells called ISLETS of LANGERHANS, which secret two hormones, INSULIN and glucagon, regulating blood-sugar levels:  another connection with sweetness. See DIABETES.

I can’t reference the islets of Langerhans without thinking about the brilliant humor of Firesign Theatre

Langerhangingly Yours,

-ACP

A Review Of The QardioCore ECG Strap From A Patient’s Perspective

One of my patients has been on the cutting edge of personal cardiac monitoring devices and I asked him to share his recent experience with the QardioCore ECG strap. What he sent me is a fascinating description of how the device works (which is unique in this area) along with how it was crucial in diagnosing the cause of his recent symptoms. I’m sharing it below.


I’m a current patient of the Skeptical Cardiologist and have experienced recovery from 14 months of Atrial Fibrillation with Rapid Ventricular Response, and subsequent heart failure.   While I haven’t had symptoms of heart failure or Atrial Fibrillation in over 6 months, as a former long-distance cyclist, I had been following the progress for the FDA approval of the QardioCore device since it was announced over a year ago.   You can learn more about their device at https://www.getqardio.com/qardiocore-wearable-ecg-ekg-monitor-iphone/, but I’ve pasted text from their website here: (https://support.getqardio.com/hc/en-us/articles/115000257105-Electrocardiogram-ECG-EKG- )

“QardioCore is a clinical-quality wearable electrocardiogram recorder. An electrocardiogram – often abbreviated as ECG or EKG – is a test that measures the electrical activity of the heart. With each heart beat, an electrical impulse (or “wave”) travels through the heart. This wave causes the muscle to squeeze and pump blood from the heart.

 

An ECG gives two major kinds of information. First, by measuring time intervals on the ECG, a doctor can determine how long the electrical wave takes to pass through the heart. Finding out how long the wave takes to travel from one part of the heart to the next shows if the electrical activity is normal or slow, fast or irregular. Second, by measuring the amount of electrical activity passing through the heart muscle, a cardiologist may be able to find out if parts of the heart are too large or are overworked. During an ECG, several sensors, called electrodes, capture the electrical activity of the heart.

QardioCore is ideal for health conscious individuals or those with known or suspected heart conditions to record their everyday ECGs, physical activity, sport performance and medical symptoms and share their data with their doctors. Medical professionals can use QardioCore to quickly assess heart rate and rhythm, screen for arrhythmias, and remotely monitor and manage patients who use QardioCore.

 

QardioCore should be only used in conjunction with professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and not as a substitute, or a replacement for it. Qardio creates products and services that conform to US quality, safety and security requirements for medical products, while delivering a modern user experience. QardioCore will begin selling in the US after receiving US Food and Drug Administration clearance.”

Unfortunately, the US FDA tends to move slowly, and we can only speculate as too why, but the device is not available for purchase here.   However, I found a friend in France who purchased one for me and shipped me the device.   It is not illegal for me to use the device here, but it is not allowed to be sold here in the US.

I use an Apple I-Phone 8Plus and have used both the AliveCor KardiaBand and the KardiaMobile found here (https://store.alivecor.com), and reviewed by the esteemed Skeptical Cardiologist in other posts as well.   While I find it as a useful tool, my only dissatisfaction is that I want to passively monitor my heart during sporting activities and look for rhythm disturbances.   While I’m no expert in either sporting activities or rhythm disturbances, I’ve completed some healthy reading and living on both subjects and have a general awareness of the topic.

The QardioCore device is simple to wear, comes with three belts that can be used and cleaned, and comes with a charging cable.   Everything that the app, and the product does, seems to be accurately described on their web site, so I won’t cover off on details here.   You can read more about it at this link:   https://www.getqardio.com/qardioapp/   My only dissatisfaction with this device, and other blue tooth devices, has nothing to do with the device itself.   Apple seems to randomly disconnect from Bluetooth devices with their phones.   I don’t pretend to know the specific mechanisms for the problem, but my blue tooth devices for bicycling, music headsets, and heart monitoring have all been plagued with intermittent blue tooth connection problems.   So, at times, I find myself having to restart their app to keep the device connected, which is a minor annoyance.   

I also use the QardioArm product to measure and monitor my blood pressure and am satisfied with it as well.

What follows is my anecdotal experiences of September 26, 2018 through the present day and I agreed to write about them here, in case it provides useful insight to others in some way.

As a person with a short-term history of heart problems, I tend to capture a lot of data with my devices.   I monitor things like heart rate variability, blood pressure, Alivecor Kardia readings, sleep history, etc.   I make an active attempt to monitor my levels of stress, but I know for certain that I lead a stressful life.  I work longer hours than I should, probably sleep less than I should, exercise less than I like and should, and medicate and pray far less than I should.  So, I don’t want to imply that anything that happened is the fault of the medical system, bad blue tooth connections, bad medical care, or bad advice from the Skeptical Cardiologist or any other medical professional.   I tend to listen well, learn well, but I don’t always act as I should.  But, I’m responsible for my choices, my decisions, and I live with the results of my actions.

With that said, I was sitting at the office on Wednesday September 26th, 2018 and was working away without a care in the world.   As a computer programmer, I’m very sedentary and enjoy my work.   I was wearing my QardioCore ECG strap at the time because I’m a big believer in capturing baseline data for my general living and lifestyle.   I believe this data was invaluable in my first episode of heart problems, but have no supporting evidence to support my claim.   At around 8:58:42 AM, I felt somewhat bad, and felt my heart racing.   I glanced over at my phone which was showing the ECG trace at the time and noticed what I believed was Atrial Flutter at the time.   But, after about 20 seconds, the ECG trace returned to normal, and I felt fine again.   I made a quick note of the time, because I was busy, and continued working for the day.  The Quardio App provides no diagnostic information, so it doesn’t analyze and interpret ECG patterns like the Alivecor Kardia app does. When I arrived at home later that day, I went back to look at the ECG trace, as the Quardio App easily allows that through features of the App.   When I found the point in time of the ECG, I became concerned immediately because I believe that I was seeing a pattern that I recognized as Ventricular Tachycardia, a condition that comes in many forms, and has many causes, but can be fatal if not properly treated.   As my cortisol levels increased, I contacted Dr. Google and just quickly verified that I wasn’t completely nuts, although I acknowledge there may be some partial nuttiness there.   While going through this process, I experienced another 4 second episode which only increased my anxiety levels.   After contacting my wife and asking her to return home, and informing some family members, I felt it best that I should contact the Skeptical Cardiologist after hours for input on my problem.   I hate to bother the doctor, as he is a busy man, but contacted his after-hours number.  While the operator on the other end of the line wondered what kind of nut case I was, she kindly contacted the doctor who promptly called me on my cell phone.    I had informed the kind doctor that I had the device about three weeks prior, so he was already aware that I had the QardioCore.   I quickly informed the doctor that I believed I had experienced at least one but possibly two cardiac events.   After briefly talking, I hung up the phone and texted him photos of the screens from the Quardio App, so he could see the ECG tracings.   Here are the photos that I sent to the Skeptical Cardiologist via text:

 

 

IMG_6828

 

IMG_6829

I believe this tool is valuable in many ways, but I believe that it was helpful for the Skeptical Cardiologist, as it helped narrow our focus of blood tests, scans, and potential procedures to run in a faster than normal basis.   Normally, if I had not had evidence (accurate or not), I would have had to schedule an appointment, or go to ER.   At that point, they would have either ordered an event monitor for me to wear while I was away from the hospital, or they would have had to admit me.   Since I had a past history of Atrial Fibrillation, which isn’t quite as serious, we would have been sent home with an event monitor and instructions to take it easy and continue to take meds.   We would have run more blood work, and more scans, but the point is that we would have been more broadly focused, as we would have had to generally guess as to the nature of the event and narrow it down.

I recognize that this is one of the controversies that is active in clinical cardiology, as I listen to podcasts by Dr. John Mandrola and others regarding the latest cardio devices, procedures and research.   I realize that many Cardiologists are not in favor of devices like these, because they lead to uninformed conclusions, which leads to unneeded stress on both patients and their stressed-out doctors and cardiologists.   I’ve listened to both sides of the argument, and I have my own opinions that I won’t express here.   I will just say that I believe that this device saved me time, possibly my life (as I don’t know what I don’t know, unless I know to look), and some time in hastening and narrowing my therapy choices.

I will say that my wife and I were extremely happy with the services provided by his staff, himself, his colleagues, and the hospital staff as well.   While I am confident I may be considered a difficult patient by some, or many, they were very thorough and kind in their treatment and explanation of my treatment options.

I hope that my experience adds helpful insight to the discussion.   I’m confident that the Skeptical Cardiologist will add to this post, with his views on the events I’ve discussed above.   And, I believe he appreciates having a Skeptical Patient every now and then as well.


As The Skeptical Patient wrote,  this device is not sold in the United States. Having seen it in action now, I’m eager to get my hands on one and evaluate it further. It could dramatically alter home arrhythmia monitoring. For this patient it was incredibly helpful.  If any of my European or Australian readers has experience with it please let me know.

Qardio makes a stylish, accurate and portable home BP monitor that I’ve written favorably about here.

Qardiodynamically Yours,

-ACP

N.B. Featured image of man running on beach with QardioCore is not of my patient.

PURE Study Further Exonerates Dairy Fat: Undeterred, The AHA Persists In Vilifying All Saturated Fat

The skeptical cardiologist had been avoiding reader pleas to comment on a paper recently published in the Lancet from the PURE study which showed that full fat dairy consumption is associated with a lower risk of mortality and cardiovascular disease. It felt like beating a dead horse since  I’ve been writing for the last 5 years that the observational evidence nearly unanimously shows that full fat dairy is associated with less abdominal fat, lower risk of diabetes and lower risk of developing vascular complications such as stroke and heart attack. However, since bad nutritional advice in this area stubbornly persists and the PURE study is so powerful and universally applicable, I felt compelled to post my observations.

What Did the PURE Study Show?

The PURE (Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology)  study enrolled 136, 00 individuals aged 35–70 years from 21 countries in five continents. Dietary intakes of dairy products ( milk, yoghurt, and cheese) were recorded.. Food intake was stratified  into whole-fat and low-fat dairy. The primary outcome was the composite of mortality or major cardiovascular events.

Consumption of 2 servings of dairy per day versus none was associated with a 16% lower risk of the primary outcome. The high dairy consumers had an overall 17% lower risk of dying. They had a 34% lower risk of stroke.

People whose only dairy consumption consisted of  whole-fat products had a significantly lower risk of the composite primary endpoint (29%).

Here’s how one of the authors of the PURE study summarized his findings (quoted in a good summary at TCTMD)

“We are suggesting that dairy consumption should not be discouraged,” lead investigator Mahshid Dehghan, PhD (McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada), told TCTMD. “In fact, it should be encouraged in low-to-middle income countries, as well as in high-income countries among individuals who do not consume dairy. We have people in North America and Europe who are scared of dairy and we would tell them that three servings per day is OK. You can eat it, and there are beneficial effects. Moderation is the message of our study.”

 

Despite these recent  findings and the total lack of any previous data that indicates substituting low or no fat dairy for full fat dairy is beneficial,  the American Heart Association (AHA)and major nutritional organizations continue to recommend skim or low fat cheese, yogurt and milk over full fat , non-processed  dairy products.

The AHA Continues Its Misguided Vilification Of All Saturated Fat

Medpage today quoted an AHA spokesman as saying in response to the PURE study:

“Currently with the evidence that we have reviewed, we still believe that you should try to limit your saturated fat including fat that this is coming from dairy products,” commented Jo Ann Carson, PhD, of UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas and a spokesperson for the American Heart Association.

“It is probably wise and beneficial to be sure you’re including dairy in that overall heart-healthy dietary pattern, but we would continue to recommend that you make lower fat selections in the dairy products,” Carson told MedPage Today regarding the study, with which she was not involved.

 

What is their rationale? A misguided focus on macronutrients. For decades these people have been preaching that saturated fat is bad and unsaturated fat is good. All saturated fat is bad. All unsaturated fat is good.

To deem even one product which contains a significant amount of saturated fat as acceptable would undermine the public’s confidence in the saturated fat dogma.

Bad Nutritional Advice From The AHA Is Not New

Of course, the AHA has been notoriously off base on its nutritional advice for decades. selling its “heart-check” seal of approval to sugar-laden cereals such as Trix, Cocoa Puffs, and Lucky Charms and promoting trans-fat laden margarine. These products could qualify as heart-healthy because they were low in cholesterol and saturated fat.

To this day, the AHA’s heart-check program continues to promote highly processed junk food as heart-healthy while raking in millions of dollars from food manufacturers.

The AHA’s heart-check program is still using low cholesterol as a criteria for heart-healthy food whereas the 2015 Dietary Guidelines concluded that dietary cholesterol intake was no longer of concern.

Why would anyone believe the AHA’s current nutritional advice is credible given the historical inaccuracy of the program?

I’ve noticed that the dairy industry has done nothing to counter the idea that Americans should be consuming skim or low fat dairy product and discussed this with a dairy farmer who only sells full fat products a few years ago.

I posted his comments on this in my blog In April, 2016 and thought I would repost that posting for newer readers below:

 

The Skim Milk Scam:Words of Wisom From a Doctor Dairy Farmer

 

Full fat dairy is associated with less abdominal fat, lower risk of diabetes and lower risk of developing vascular complications such as stroke and heart attack.
quart_whole_milk_yogurt-293x300I’ve been consuming  full fat yogurt and milk  from Trader’s Point Creamery in Zionsville, Indiana almost exclusively since visiting the farm and interviewing its owners a few years ago.

Dr. Peter(Fritz) Kunz, a plastic surgeon, and his wife Jane, began selling milk from their farm after researching methods for rotational grazing , a process which allows  the cows to be self-sustaining: the cows feed themselves by eating the grass and in turn help fertilize the fields,  . After a few years of making sure they had the right grasses and cows, the Kunz’s opened Traders Point Creamery in 2003.

Two more studies (summarized nicely on ConscienHealth, an obesity and health blog)  came out recently solidifying the extensive data supporting the health of dairy fat and challenging the nutritional dogma that all Americans should be consuming low-fat as opposed to full fat dairy.

The Dairy Industry’s Dirty Little Secret

Dr. Kunz opened my eyes to the dirty little secret of the dairy industry when i first talked to him: dairy farmers double their income by allowing milk to be split into its fat and non-fat portions therefore the industry has no motivation to promote full fat dairy over nonfat dairy.

Recently, I  presented him with a few follow-up questions to help me understand why we can’t reverse the bad nutritional advice to consume low-fat dairy.

Skeptical Cardiologist: “When we first spoke and I was beginning my investigation into dairy fat and cardiovascular disease you told me that most dairy producers are fine with the promotion of non fat or low fat dairy products because if consumers are choosing low fat or skim dairy this allows the dairy producer to profit from the skim milk production as well as the dairy fat that is separated and sold for butter, cheese or cream products.”
I  don’t have a clear idea of what the economics of this are. Do you think this, for example, doubles the profitability of a dairy?

Dr. Kunz: “Yes, clearly. Butter, sour cream, and ice cream are highly profitable products… All these processes leave a lot of skim milk to deal with, and the best opportunity to sell skim milk is to diet-conscious and heart-conscious people who believe fat is bad.”

Skeptical Cardiologist:” I’ve been baffled by public health recommendations to consume low fat dairy as the science would suggest the opposite. The only reason I can see that this persists is that the Dairy Industry Lobby , for the reason I pointed out above, actually has a vested interest from a profitability standpoint in lobbying for the low fat dairy consumption.. Do you agree that this is what is going on? ”

 
Dr. Kunz: “Yes, definitely. The obsession with low-fat as it relates to diet and cardiac health has been very cleverly marketed. Fat does NOT make you fat.

Skeptical Cardiologist: “Also, I have had trouble finding out the process of production of skim milk. I’ve come across sites claiming that the process involves injection of various chemical agents but I can’t seem to find a reliable reference source on this. Do you have any information/undestanding of this process and what the down sides might be? I would like to be able to portray skim milk as a “processed food” which, more and more, we seem to be recognizing as bad for us.”

 

Dr. Kunz: “The PMO pasteurized milk ordinance states that when you remove fat you have to replace the fat soluble vitamins A & D. Apparently the Vitamin A & D have to be stabilized with a chemical compound to keep them miscible in basically an aqueous solution. The compound apparently contains MSG!! We were shocked to find this out and it further confirmed that we did not want to do a reduced fat or skim milk product.”

Skeptical Cardiologist: ” Any thoughts on A2? Marion Nestle’, of Food Politics fame, was recently in Australia where there is a company promoting A2 milk as likely to cause GI upset. It has captured a significant share of the Aussie market.”

 

Dr. Kunz: “We have heard of this and have directed our farm to test and replace any A1 heterozygous or homozygous cows.  We believe that very few of our herd would have A1 genetics because of the advantage of using heritage breeds like Brown Swiss and Jersey instead of Holstein.  Because few people are actually tested for lactose intolerance and because of the marketing of A2, it’s imperative not to be left behind in this – whether or not it turns out to be a true and accurate cause of people’s GI upset.

Skeptical Cardiologist:” I like that your milk is nonhomogenized. Seems like the less “processing” the better for food.  I haven’t found any compelling scientific reasons to recommend it to my patients, however. Do  you have any?”

 

Dr. Kunz: The literature is fairly old on this subject, but xanthine oxidase apparently can become encapsulated in the fat globules and it can be absorbed into the vascular tree and cause vascular injury.  I will look for the articles.  Anyway, taking your milk and subjecting it to 3000-5000 psi (homogenization conditions) certainly causes damage to the delicate proteins and even the less delicate fat globules.  Also remember that dietary cholesterol is not bad but oxidized cholesterol is very bad for you. That’s why overcooking egg yolks and high pressure spray drying to make powder products can be very dangerous – like whey protein powders that may contain some fats.

Skeptical Cardiologist: I spend a fair amount of time traveling in Europe and am always amazed that their milk is ultrapasteurized and sits unrefrigerated on the shelves. any thoughts on that process versus regular pasteurization and on pasteurization in general and its effects on nutritional value of dairy.

Dr. Kunz :“Absolutely crazy bad and nutritionally empty.. don’t know why anyone would buy it. The procedure is known as aseptic pasteurization and is how Nestle makes its wonderful Nesquik. If they made a full fat version of an aseptically pasteurized product it may have more oxidized cholesterol and be more harmful than no fat!!”
So there you have it, Straight from the  doctor dairy farmer’s mouth:
Skimming the healthy dairy fat out of  milk is a highly profitable process. Somehow, without a shred of scientific support,  the dairy industry, in cahoots with misguided and close-minded nutritionists, has convinced the populace that this ultra-processed skim milk pumped full of factory-produced synthetic vitamins is healthier than the original product.
Lactosingly Yours
-ACP
The two  recent articles (mentioned in this post) supporting full fat dairy are:

Circulating Biomarkers of Dairy Fat and Risk of Incident Diabetes Mellitus Among US Men and Women in Two Large Prospective Cohorts

which concluded ‘In two prospective cohorts, higher plasma dairy fatty acid concentrations were associated with lower incident diabetes. Results were similar for erythrocyte 17:0. Our findings highlight need to better understand potential health effects of dairy fat; and dietary and metabolic determinants of these fatty acids

and from Brazilian researchers

Total and Full-Fat, but Not Low-Fat, Dairy Product Intakes are Inversely Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Adults1

My New Apple Watch 4 Is Nice: But It Won’t Record ECGs or Work With KardiaBand!

The skeptical cardiologist picked up an Apple Watch 4  at the Galleria Apple Store in St. Louis today.  The Apple employee who retrieved it told me that ECG recording capabilities were expected in the fall. Of course fall began today and it is not at all clear when, if ever, Apple will provide the software update to its AW4 that will provide ECG capabilities.

Fortunately, consumers already have the capability of  recording a medical grade single lead ECG with any Apple Watch 2 or 3-using the KardiaBand from AliveCor.

Apple has hubristically proclaimed the AW4 as the  ultimate guardian of our health and while setting it up I was asked if I wanted the watch to notify me if my heart rate dropped below 40 bpm for 10 minutes. Sure! Let’s see how irritating this feature will be.

 

 

After setting up the new watch I immediately attached my KardiaBand and installed the Kardia Apple Watch app.

I was able to open the Kardia app and it performed its normal SmartRhythm monitoring but when I tried to record an ECG, alas, nothing happened.

It appears that the KardiaBand does not work with the new Apple Watch 4. Yet.

I was informed by Ira Bahr at AliveCor that their “testing on AW4 is not yet complete. So at present, the device is not supported.”

Now I face a difficult decision-Do I wear my new AW4 with a non KardiaBand wrist band (and no ECG capability) or wear my old Apple Watch with the KardiaBand (and outstanding ECG capability.)

ACP

Were They Visions of Quilotoa Or The Birthplace Of Little Rocket Man?

The skeptical cardiologist periodically updates the “header image” for this blog, typically uploading an iPhone “pani” of somethinng he considers beautiful, cool or quirky from one of his travels.

I can’t recall any comments on the header images so I had presumed that nobody really cares what is up there.

However, for my last header image (which at the time of this writing should still be above) I used a picture from my recent trip to Ecuador.

Stunning views of the lake in the caldera of Quilotoa and the surrounding mountains. The hike down to the water is steep and dusty. Due to the altitude of 13,000 feet climbing up was really difficult and 3/4 of our party elected to pay 10$ for a donkey ride. Only the galloping gastroenterologist, David Lotsoff could make it up on his own two feet.

After returning from the Galapagos we drove north from Quito for 4 hours to Quilotoa and took the picture that is the current header image.

Per Wikipedia

Quilotoa (Spanish pronunciation: [kiloˈto.a]) is a water-filled caldera and the most western volcano in the EcuadorianAndes. The 3-kilometre (2 mi)-wide caldera was formed by the collapse of this dacite volcano following a catastrophic VEI-6 eruption about 600  years ago.

A reader, commenting on my aspirin post, added the following cryptic words:

Also, I would be (very) interested to know about your ‘attachment’ / interest in Chang Bai Shan (‘Great White Mountain’ on the border of China / N Korea; one of the world’s largest stratovolcanoes)??? FWIW, we have(nick-)named one of our grandchildren (boy) with this name. My wife is Chinese/Taiwanese; my daughter has lived for 15? years in Beijing… All speak Mandarin (& English)…
 
I had no idea what he was talking about until I googled chang bai shan and looked at this image of “Heavenly Lake” which looks remarkably similar to the view we had over the Lagoon inside Quilotoa.

 

 

“Changbaishan Nature Reserve is the largest reserve in China, covering over 850 square miles. The rocks of Changbaishan supposedly have a white shimmer, giving the area its name (changbai means “ever white” in Chinese). The vast reserve comprises a collection of craggy peaks encircling Heavenly Lake, which occupies the crater of a long dormant volcano.”

This Chinese tourism site notes that a third of the Heavenly Lake lies in North Korea ” and its environs are considered sacred by both the Chinese and North Koreans; in Korean the area is known as Paektusan, and the North Korean leader Kim Jong Il claimed it as his “birthplace”. The imperial Qing dynasty, a Manchu family, revered Changbaishan as a holy land and the cradle of the Manchurian race.”

Despite the attraction of seeing the birthplace of Little Rocket Man, I have decided not to put Changbaishan on my bucket list because

Heavenly Lake’s cross-border status demands careful hiking – as recently as 1998 a British tourist was incarcerated for a month in North Korea for accidentally stepping across the poorly demarcated international line.

Stratovolcanically Yours,

-ACP

N.B. One of our party (who shall remain eternally nameless) experienced symptoms likely related to the rapid ascent to 13000 feet.

Acute mountain sickness is the most common type of high-altitude illness and occurs in more than one-fourth of people traveling to above 3500 m (11 667 ft) and more than one-half of people traveling to above 6000 m (20 000 ft). Symptoms include headache, fatigue, poor appetite, nausea or vomiting, light-headedness, and sleep disturbances. Symptoms usually occur 6 to 12 hours after ascent and can range from mild to severe.

Here’s  a cool graphic from JAMA related to it

Revisiting Who Should Take Aspirin

Four years ago the skeptical cardiologist wrote the (in his extremely humble  and biased opinion) the definitive post on aspirin and cardiovascular disease.  Entitled “Should I take aspirin to prevent stroke or heart attack“,  it pointed out that although Dr. Oz had recently told almost all middle-aged women to take a baby aspirin and fish oil, there was, in fact no evidence to support that practice.

The publication of the ASPREE (Aspirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly) trial results in the latest issue of the New England Journal of Medicine further strengthens the points I made in 2014.

Between 2010 and 2014 the ASPREE investigators enrolled over 19,000 community-dwelling persons in Australia and the United States who were 70 years of age or older (or ≥65 years of age among blacks and Hispanics in the United States) and did not have cardiovascular disease, dementia, or disability.

(It’s important to look closely at the precise inclusion and exclusion criteria in randomized studies  to understand fully the implications of the results (for example, what qualified as cardiovascular disease) and I’ve listed them at the end of this post.)

Study participants were randomly assigned to receive 100 mg of enteric-coated aspirin or placebo. At the end of the study about 2/3 of participants in both groups were still taking their pills.

When I wrote about aspirin in 2014 I focused on cardiovascular disease. At that time, there was some reasonable evidence that aspirin might lower the risk of colorectal cancer. But when we look at outcomes the bottom line is how the drug influences the overall mix of diseases and deaths.

The ASPREE researchers chose disability-free survival, defined as survival free from dementia or persistent physical disability (inability to perform or severe difficulty in performing at least one of the six basic activities of daily living that had persisted for at least 6 monthas their primary end-point which makes a lot of sense-patients don’t want to just live longer, they want to live longer with a good quality of life. If aspirin, to take a totally hypothetical example) is stopping people from dying from heart attacks but making them demented it’s not benefiting them overall.

After 5 years there was no difference in the rate of death, dementia or permanent physical disability between the aspirin group (21.5 events per 1000 person-years) and placebo group (21.2 per 1000).

However those taking aspirin had a significantly higher rate of major bleeding (3.8%) than those taking placebo (2.8%).

The risk of death from any cause was 12.7 events per 1000 person-years in the aspirin group and 11.1 events per 1000 person-years in the placebo group.. Cancer was the major contributor to the higher mortality in the aspirin group, accounting for 1.6 excess deaths per 1000 person-years.

Screen Shot 2018-09-19 at 9.26.41 AM

And, despite prior analyses suggesting aspirin reduces colorectal cancer the opposite was found in this study. Aspirin takers were 1.8 times more likely to die from colorectal cancer and 2.2 times more likely to die from breast cancer.nejmoa1803955_t2

 

Did Aspirin Reduce Cardiovascular Events?

No. It did not.

A separate paper analyzed cardiovascular outcomes

After a median of 4.7 years of follow-up, the rate of cardiovascular disease was 10.7 events per 1000 person-years in the aspirin group and 11.3 events per 1000 person-years in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83 to 1.08). The rate of major hemorrhage was 8.6 events per 1000 person-years and 6.2 events per 1000 person-years, respectively (hazard ratio, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.18 to 1.62; P<0.001).

The ASPREE study confirms what I advised in 2014 and hopefully will further reduce the inappropriate consumption of aspirin among low risk individuals.

I’ve taken more patients off aspirin since 2014 than I’ve started on and what I wrote then remains relevant and reflects my current practice. Especially in light of the increase cancer risk noted in ASPREE patients should only take aspirin for good reasons.

Below is my 2014 post entitled “Should I Take Aspirin To Prevent Heart Attack or Stroke.”

Aspirin is a unique drug, the prototypical  two-edged sword of pharmaceuticals. It t has the capability of stopping platelets, the sticky elements in our blood, from forming clots that cause strokes and heart attacks when arterial plaques rupture, but it increases the risk of serious bleeding into the brain or from the GI tract. Despite these powerful properties, aspirin is available over the counter and is very cheap, thus anyone can take it in any dosage they want. 

Who Should Take Aspirin?

For the last five years I’ve been advising my patients who have no evidence of atherosclerotic vascular disease against taking aspirin to prevent heart attack and stroke. Several comprehensive reviews of all the randomized trials of aspirin had concluded by 2011 that

The current totality of evidence provides only modest support for a benefit of aspirin in patients without clinical cardiovascular disease, which is offset by its risk. For every 1,000 subjects treated with aspirin over a 5-year period, aspirin would prevent 2.9 MCE and cause 2.8 major bleeds.

(MCE=major cardiovascular events, e.g. stroke, heart attack, death from cardiovascular disease)

Dr. Oz, on the other hand, came to St. Louis in 2011 to have  lunch with five hundred women and advised them all to take a baby aspirin daily (and fish oil, which is not indicated for primary prevention as I have discussed here). When I saw these women subsequently in my office I had to spend a fair amount of our visit explaining why they didn’t need to take aspirin and fish oil.

After reviewing available data, the FDA this week issued a statementrecommending against aspirin use for the prevention of a first heart attack or stroke in patients with no history of cardiovascular disease (i.e. for primary prevention). The FDA pointed out that aspirin use is associated with “serious risks,” including increased risk of bleeding in the stomach and brain. As for secondary prevention for people with cardiovascular disease or those who have had a previous heart attack or stroke (secondary prevention), the available evidence continues to support aspirin use.

Subclinical Atherosclerosis and Aspirin usage

As I’ve discussed previously, however, many individuals who have not had a stroke or heart attack are walking around with a substantial burden of atherosclerosis in their arteries. Fatty plaques can become quite advanced in the arteries to the brain and heart before they obstruct blood flow and cause symptoms. In such individuals with subclinical atherosclerosis aspirin is going to be much more beneficial.

 

Guided Use of Aspirin

zerilloplaque
Large, complex atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid artery found by vascular screening in an individual with no history of stroke, heart attack, or vascular disease. This patient will definitely benefit from daily aspirin to prevent stroke or heart attack

We have the tools available to look for atherosclerotic plaques before they rupture and cause heart attacks or stroke. Ultrasound screening of the carotid artery, as I discussed here, is one such tool: vascular screening is an accurate, harmless and painless way to assess for subclinical atherosclerosis.

Coronary calcium is another, which I’ve written extensively about.

In my practice, the answer to the question of who should or should not take aspirin is based on whether my patient has or does not have significant atherosclerosis. If they have had a clinical event due to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (stroke, heart attack, coronary stent, coronary bypass surgery, documented blocked arteries to the legs) I recommend they take one 81 milligram (baby) uncoated aspirin daily. If they have not had a clinical event but I have documented by either

  • vascular screening (significant carotid plaque)
  • coronary calcium score (high score (cut-off is debatable, more on this in a subsequent post)
  • Incidentally discovered significant plaque in the aorta or peripheral arteries (found by CT or ultrasound done for other reasons)

then I recommend a daily baby aspirin (assuming no high risk of bleeding).

There are no randomized trials testing this approach but in the next few years several large aspirin trials will be completed and hopefully we will get a better understanding of who benefits most from aspirin for primary prevention.

Until then remember that aspirin is a powerful drug with potential for good and bad effects on your body. Only take it if you and your health care provider have decided the benefits outweigh the risks after careful consideration of your particular situation

Acetylsalicylically Yours,

-ACP

 

The inclusion criteria for ASPREE define significant cardiovascular disease as follows

a past history of cardiovascular or cerebrovascular event or established CVD, defined as myocardial infarction (MI), heart failure, angina pectoris, stroke, transient ischemic attack, >50% carotid stenosis or previous carotid endarterectomy or stenting, coronary artery angioplasty or stenting, coronary artery bypass grafting, abdominal aortic aneurysm

Apple’s Alternative Facts And The Giant Watch Restaurant Next Door To AliveCor

As I pointed out Friday,  Apple’s claim that the ECG sensor on their new Apple Watch 4  (available “later this year”) is  “the First ECG product offered over the counter directly to consumers” is totally bogus.

AliveCor’s Kardia mobile ECG device was approved by the FDA  for over the counter direct to consumer sales on February 10, 2014. Apple had to have known this as they worked with AliveCor to bring the first Apple Watch based ECG device to FDA approval in 2017.

I tried but failed to get AliveCor founder Dr. David Albert’s thoughts on Apple’s disinformation but Yahoo finance was able to speak to Vic Gundotra, the CEO of AliveCor:

Over at the headquarters of AliveCor, a startup based in Google’s hometown of Mountain View, they, too, were surprised by the announcement, CEO Vic Gundotra said in a phone interview on Thursday. Gundotra is a former Googler, widely known as the executive behind the Google+ social network.

Specifically, Gundotra says that his company was confused by Apple’s claims that the Series 4 will be the first over-the-counter ECG testing device for consumers. AliveCor is a 49-employee startup that makes over-the-counter ECG testing devices and software, including an FDA-cleared band for the Apple Watch, called KardiaBand, and a version that attaches to a smartphone, called Kardia.

Gundotra was also surprised by Apple’s claims of ECG primacy

“We were watching [the announcement], and we were surprised,” Gundotra said. “It was amazing, it was like us being on stage, with the thing we’ve been doing for 7 years,” referring to AliveCor’s product for detecting atrial fibrillation  (AFib), a tough-to-spot heart disorder that manifests as an irregular, often quick heart rate that can cause poor circulation.

“Although when they said they were first to go over-the-counter, we were surprised,” he continued. “Apple doesn’t like to admit they copy anyone, even in the smallest things. Their own version of alternative facts.”

One man’s alternative fact is another (less polite) man’s lie.

Gundotra apparently views Apple’s entry as a good thing

“We love that Apple is validating AFib; just wait until you see what AliveCor is going to do next,” he said. “We were a great restaurant in a remote section of town, and someone just opened a giant restaurant right next to us, bringing a lot more attention.”

And as I pointed out previously, the AliveCor mobile ECG device (not the Kardia Band) is significantly cheaper than an Apple Watch and has multiple studies showing its accuracy. Interestingly, Gundotra indicates AliveCor sales has increased after the Apple announcement,.

“Ours is $99, theirs is $399, our sales popped yesterday, big time,”

Antialternafactively Yours,

-ACP