Category Archives: Dairy

How Starbucks is Making Heart-Healthy Coffee into A Stealth Dessert

Chemex
The Skeptical Cardiologist’s preferred method of making coffee-hand poured over freshly ground beans, filtered through a Chemex filter (yes, I know it’s laborious and the pictures aren’t as pretty as Starbucks, but it is really good!)

Many of my patients believe that coffee is bad for them. I’m not sure where this belief comes from; perhaps the general belief that anything that they really like and are potentially addicted to cannot be healthy.

It’s not uncommon for a patient to tell me after a heart attack that they have “really cleaned up their act” and have stopped drinking alcohol and cut back on coffee. They seem disappointed when I tell them that moderate alcohol consumption and coffee consumption are heart healthy behaviors.

In contrast to what the public believes, the scientific evidence very consistently suggests that drinking coffee is associated with living longer and having less heart attacks and strokes. Multiple publications in major cardiology journals in the last few  years have confirmed this.

You can read the details here and here. The bottom line is that higher levels of coffee consumption (>1 cup per day in the US and >2 cups per day in Europe) are NOT associated with:

  • Hypertension (if you are a habitual consumer)
  • Higher total or bad cholesterol  (unless you consume unfiltered coffee like Turkish, Greek or French Press types, which allow a fair amount of the cholesterol-raising diterpenes into the brew)
  • Increase in dangerous (atrial fibrillation/ventricular tachycardia) or benign (premature ventricular or supra-ventricular contractions) irregularities in heart rhythm

Higher levels of coffee consumption compared to no or lower levels IS associated with:

  • lower risk of Type 2 Diabetes
  • lower risk of dying, more specifically lower mortality from cardiovascular disease
  • Lower risk of stroke

So, if you like coffee and it makes you feel good, drink it without guilt, there is nothing to suggest it is hurting your cardiovascular health. It’s a real food. These tend to be good for you.

Making Coffee Unhealthy: Dessert as Stealth Food

People have always added things to coffee – cream, half and half, milk, skim milk, sugar, artificial sweeteners. The coffee data doesn’t reveal to us what the consequences of these additions are, but given the consistent positive health associations of coffee, they must have had a minor effect.

However, in the last 20 years, the food industry, led by the behemoth Starbucks (which controls 1/3 of the coffee served in the US and has 11,000 stores and growing) has turned coffee into a stealth dessert. Starbucks offers the consumer (by their own admission) 87,000 different choices of coffee drinks.
A basic coffee house drink is a latte’. This consists of one or more shots of espresso combined with steamed milk (skim, 2% or whole) and topped with foam. According to Starbucks, the 16 ounce, medium (I refuse to use their size terminology), cafe latte’ made with 2% milk, contains 17 grams of sugar and 7 grams of fat, yielding a reasonable 190 calories. Those who drink these should understand that they are consuming a glass of milk, plus coffee. Dairy products have consistently been associated with lower cardiovascular risk. They would arguably be better off consuming a whole milk (11 grams fat, 16 grams sugar, 220 calories) latte’ as I’ve pointed out in previous blogs here and here.

 

 

( Cinnamon Dolce Latte . Picture taken from Starbucks web site.

Most of the latte’s consumed at Starbucks aren’t plain latte’s, however; they are nightmares of added sugar. Let’s take the Cinnamon Dolce Latte’: (A complete nutritional breakdown is available from Starbucks’ website (I do congratulate Starbucks for finally capitulating and presenting nutritional data on their products at stores, allowing the public to draw back the curtain on the Starbucks Oz. Their website provides a cool way to compare your drink with whole/2%/skim/soy milk or with and without whipped cream)) It contains 38 grams of sugar, 6 grams of fat, and 11 grams of protein, yielding 260 calories, 152 of which are coming from sugar. That’s 22 grams more sugar, compared to their unadulterated latte’. (There must be an internet site devoted to promoting the health benefits of cinnamon since I hear about them so often from my patients but this claim is not evidence-based)

 

 

mochae frap
Picture of the Mocha Frappacino “Dessert” from the Starbuck website

My 17 year old daughter’s drink of choice at Starbucks is the Mocha Frappuccino® Blended Beverage, which, according to Starbucks, is “Coffee with rich mocha-flavored sauce, blended with milk and ice. Topped with sweetened whipped cream.” It contains 60 grams of sugar, 15 grams of fat and has 400 calories.

Such concoctions have no right to consider themselves coffee, they should be labeled as a sugar-laden dessert that happens to have some coffee in it. To give some perspective, the typical 20 ounce soda contains 40 grams of sugar (the equivalent of 10 packs of sugar).  Starbucks has added 44 grams of sugar to coffee and milk in order to draw children, teens and unsuspecting adults to consume more “coffee.”

There is growing evidence that sugar, not fat, is the major toxin in our diet. The misguided concept that cutting fat in the diet and replacing it with anything, including sugar, will reduce cardiovascular disease is gradually being rolled back. Nutritional advocates are now zeroing in on appropriate targets like sugary beverages.

It’s sad that Starbucks, which started out making a good, real product that was actually good for you, has morphed into an international, growth-obsessed, behemoth that is pumping billions of grams of added sugar into our stomachs.

But, as the significant other of the skeptical cardiologist (SOSC) often muses, people are always looking for new ways to con themselves into thinking they are eating/drinking something healthy, when in fact, they are just eating/drinking cleverly disguised desserts. Starbucks has made a huge success for themselves by providing people what they want: a way to kid themselves.

 

Is A Snickers Bar Healthier Than Yoplait Yogurt?

This container of Yoplait comes from the refrigerator in the Doctor’s Lounge at my hospital. It is often the go-to snack for busy doctors and health conscious consumers.
I used to consider Yoplait about as healthy a snack as I could get. After all, it was low in fat, owned by French farmers and it had pictures of fruit on it. How could I go wrong?yoplait

In addition, Yoplait is focused on making “so good yogurt” as the company (now owned by General Mills) explains

“Ultimately, we’re focused on making so good yogurt, and here’s how we see it: you can eat something that tastes amazing but isn’t that good for you. You can eat stuff that’s really good for you, but doesn’t always leave you yummed up. So good yogurt does both. All of you is happy, not just your tongue. And while so goodness will never be perfect, we’ll keep working on ways to make our yogurt more so good than it is today.”

The significant other of the skeptical cardiologist (SOSC) made the claim recently that women who felt they were having a healthy lunch by consuming fat free yogurt and salad with sugary, fat-free salad dressing might as well be eating a candy bar. At least they would enjoy it more! Could this be true?

Yoplait made the bold step in 2012 of taking out the high fructose corn syrup they had been adding to their yogurt (or yoghurt as they like to spell it), but it’s still chock full of added sugar (which is probably why it leaves you “yummed up”)

What is now in “original” Yoplait?

Original Yoplait has 12 ingredients. They are Cultured pasteurized Grade A Low Fat Milk, Sugar, Blueberries, Modified Corn Starch, nonfat milk, kosher gelatin, citric acid, tricalcium phosphate, pectin, natural flavor colored with beet juice concentrate, Vitamin A and Vitamin D3.Yoplait_Original_Mountain-Blueberry

Indeed, the fat has been taken out but in its place – added sugar, 26 grams of sugar to be precise.

Of the 170 calories you are consuming, 104 of them are coming from sugar.

How healthy is a Snickers Bar?

snickers.jpgA regular-sized Snickers candy bar has a total of 280 calories with 13.6 grams of fat (5 grams saturated fat), 35 grams of carbohydrates (29 grams of sugar) and 4.3 grams of protein. It is made with peanuts, milk chocolate, egg whites and hydrogenated soybean oil. If we ate 2/3 of the bar to make the calories the same as the Yoplait, there would be 19 grams of sugar (compared to 26 for Yoplait) and 8 grams of fat.

A recent review of the cardiovascular effects of tree nuts and peanuts concluded:

there is impressive evidence from epidemiological and clinical trials and in vitro studies of beneficial effects of nut consumption and their constituents on the risk of CVD (cardiovascular disease), including sudden death, as well as on major and emerging CVD risk factors.

This is because in addition to a favorable fatty acid profile, nuts and peanuts contain other bioactive compounds that provide cardiovascular benefits. Other macronutrients include plant protein and fiber; micronutrients including potassium, calcium, magnesium, and tocopherols; and phytochemicals such as phytosterols, phenolic compounds, resveratrol, and arginine.


 

Curb your hunger.jpgSo, consuming 2/3 of a Snickers bar is arguably healthier than Yoplait. It contains peanuts, which have demonstrable benefits in lowering cardiovascular disease despite a high fat content. Yoplait has had the heart healthy dairy fat removed and replaced with added sugars. As I mentioned in a previous post, added sugar is clearly related to increased cardiovascular risk. The higher fat and fibre content of the peanuts in the Snickers bar will increase satiety and arguably be less likely to cause obesity due to rebound overeating later in the day.

A much healthier choice than low fat, added sugar products like Yoplait (and candy bars) is full fat, plain yogurt (preferably from grass-fed cows) as I’ve discussed in previous posts. It can be combined with real fruit or even with nuts. Full fat yogurt is surprisingly hard to find on a grocery shelf. Even at Whole Foods, the vast majority of yogurt and dairy products are low fat. I’ve only been able to find two brands, Supernatural and Trader’s Point Creamery, which consistently offer full fat yogurt.

Disclaimer and clarifications

godzilla.jpgI do not receive any payments from Snickers nor from Mars, Inc., one of the most known and beloved brands of chocolate.  I do not plan on seeing Godzilla, May 16. Although Snickers loves you, you do not need to like Snickers.snickersloves you.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Full Fat Dairy Lowers Your Risk of Obesity

ButterWhen i tell my patients that I am fine with them consuming full fat dairy products including butter I see  a mixture of responses. For many, there is a great relief that the butter they have been avoiding for the last 20 years (or consuming guiltily) can now be used. For others, the prospect of consuming full fat milk, cheese or yogurt still seems risky. After all, they have been hearing from the American Heart Association, the USDA nutritional guidelines and pretty much every nutritional advice column for the last 30 years that these products increase their risk of heart disease and contribute to obesity. Why should they believe their local cardiologist, a lone voice promoting full fat dairy against a chorus of naysayers?
Hopefully, by continuing to present scientific research on the topic I can make this concept more acceptable and counter the misinformation that is so prevalent

Researchers in Sweden have followed a cohort of rural men for over 12 years. In a previous study they found that daily intake of fruit and vegetables in combination with a high dairy fat intake was associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease. Recently they examined their data to answer the question : how does dairy fat intake impact on the risk of developing central obesity in this middle-aged male cohort?

What is central obesity?

Central obesity refers to fat that builds up inside the abdomen. It is often measured by measuring the waist circumference: > 102 cm for males and 88 cm for females is a  marker of central obesity. Central or abdominal obesity indicates insulin resistance and is part of the metabolic syndrome and well known to increase the risk of diabetes.  It is also associated with heart disease, various cancers, and dementia. In this Swedish study, central obesity was defined as waist hip ratio ≥ 1.
The study found that 197 men (15%) developed central obesity during follow-up. A low intake of dairy fat at baseline (no butter and low fat milk and seldom/never whipping cream) was associated with a higher risk of developing central obesity (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.05-2.24) and a high intake of dairy fat (butter as spread and high fat milk and whipping cream) was associated with a lower risk of central obesity (OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.33-0.83) as compared with medium intake (all other combinations of spread, milk, and cream) after adjustment for intake of fruit and vegetables, smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, age, education, and profession

Yes, these data show that participants were three times more likely to develop central obesity if they consumed skim milk and no butter compared to those who drank high fat milk and butter.

This is not an isolated finding. There is a wealth of data supporting the concept that full fat diary is less associated with obesity and markers of the metabolic syndrome, diabetes and insulin resistance.

120px-CheeseAnother recent study in a Basque population in Spain found that  participants with low or moderate consumption of cheese (high fat) compared to high consumption of cheese (high fat) had a higher prevalence of excess weight

Why do people falsely believe that fat in general and high fat dairy in particular promotes obesity?

In the past, supporters of this concept (and there are less and less in the scientific world)  would point to the energy density of fat which contains 9 calories per gram compared to 4 calories per gram for carbohydrates or protein. Obviously, if obesity is determined by calories in versus calories out then the food with more % fat compared to carbs or protein is providing more calories. All things being equal, one could expect to grow fatter on the higher % fat diet. All things are not equal, however, because one doesn’t determine how much one consumes based on the volume or weight of the food entering the mouth.

There are far more complex factors at work. How does the mixture of food components effect satiety? What is the insulin response to the food? What are the other components of the food such as vitamins, fiber, calcium and how do they interact with food absorption and metabolism?

So, even though this contradicts what has been drummed into your head for 30 years: eat full fat yogurt , cheese and milk , not fat-free, if you want to avoid getting fat

Butter versus “Healthier” Butter-like Spreads: Choose Nature over Industry

doctor's lounge donutsThe Skeptical Cardiologist occasionally wanders into the Doctors Lounge at the hospital and surveys the food choices available to him. One morning, descried amongst the carbohydrate bonanza of donuts, pastries, bagels and muffins was a bin containing little tubs of substances that could be spread on a bagel of slice of bread.

The choice was between something called Promise Buttery Spread

and Wholesome Farms Whipped Butter..

IMG_2265Conventional Wisdom and the recommendation of almost every nutritional authority for the last 30 years tells me that I should choose the Promise Buttery Spread. I would have taken this choice 5 years ago in the belief that butter with its high content of saturated fat was to be avoided. I used to spend a considerable amount of time in the pseudo-butter portion of the grocery aisles trying to determine which, of the myriad of competing alternatives, would be better than butter.
But, as I’ve noted in previous posts, the authorities have gotten it wrong.  Let’s look carefully at the two choices.

Promise Buttery Spread

Certainly the packaging would suggest that this is a “promising” choice.  It says very clearly in the small print circling the outside of the tub: “heart healthy when substituted for butter.” If you’d like to read the arcane FDA rules on which foods can make this sort of claim, they are here. Basically, if the product has less fat, saturated fat or cholesterol than butter it can make this claim.

From the website of Unilever, the giant food processing conglomerate that makes Promise and all of its siblings, we learn that Promise contains 8 grams of fat, 1.5 grams of which are saturated fat. Uniliver is very happy to provide you with the macronutrient content of Promise and its various variations. After all, they spent a lot of time researching what combination of fats, protein and carbohydrates would satisfy consumers desire for a heart-healthy substitute. Canola oil turns out to be high in monounsaturated fats just like olive oil, the major fat consumed in the heart-healthy Mediterranean diet

But how did they come up with this fine ratio of unsaturated to saturated fats? What actually goes into it?

Here are the ingredients (not obtainable from Unilever’s web site but from another source that, presumably could read the small print that I could not read on the little tub of Promise)
Vegetable Oil Blend (Liquid Soybean Oil, Canola Oil, Palm Oil, Palm Kernel Oil), Water, Whey (Milk), Salt, Vegetable Mono and Diglycerides, Soy Lecithin, (Potassium Sorbate, Calcium Disodium EDTA) Used to Protect Quality, Vitamin E Acetate, Citric Acid, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (Vitamin B6), Artificial Flavor, Maltodextrin (Corn), Vitamin A Palmitate, Beta Carotene (Color), Cholecalciferol (Vitamin 13), Cyanocobalamin (Vitamin B12).
That’s 21 ingredients, most of which are made in a factory and added back to the mixture of exotic vegetable oils, most of which is canola oil.

What is Canola Oil? Does it come from a canola plant or seed?

A good source of information (and presumably positive) is the Canola Council web site which gives the history of Canola Oil. It all begins with oil from the seed of the rape plant, a crop grown in Canada.

Rapeseed oil naturally contains a high percentage (30-60%) of erucic acid, a substance associated with heart lesions in laboratory animals. For this reason rapeseed oil was not used for consumption in the United States prior to 1974, although it was used in other countries. In 1974, rapeseed varieties with a low erucic content were introduced. Scientists had found a way to replace almost all of rapeseed’s erucic acid with oleic acid, a type of monounsaturated fatty acid.

The Canola council website says that this process of developing rapeseed with low levels of the toxic erucic acid was not accomplished by genetic engineering, but the nongmoproject.org indicates 90% of Canola oil qualifies as genetically modified.

More history from the Canola Council:

By 1978, all Canadian rapeseed produced for food use contained less than 2% erucic acid. The Canadian seed oil industry rechristened the product “canola oil” (Canadian oil, low acid) in 1978 in an attempt to distance the product from negative association with the word “rape.” Canola was introduced to American consumers in 1986. By 1990, erucic acid levels in canola oil ranged from 0.5% to 1.0%, in compliance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) standards.

The term canola was trademarked by the Western Canadian Oilseed Crushers’ Association (now the Canadian Oilseed Processors Association) to differentiate the superior low-erucic acid and low-glucosinolate varieties and their products from the older rapeseed varieties.

How is Canola Oil Processed?

Again, the Canola Council provides their summary of the process here.

Unlike olive oil which is just expeller expressed from olives, canola oil goes through quite a bit of processing. After pressing, about half of the oil is left, and the remainder is extracted by a solvent called hexane (interestingly, there is a controversy in the world of veggie burgers since hexane is used in processing soy and residual levels of this “neurotoxin” have been detected). This oil then goes through processes called degumming (which often involves mixing with acid), bleaching and deodorizing. To make a more solid form it is heated to hydrogenate the oil or palm kernel oil is mixed with it.

Is Canola Oil healthier than butter?

Unilever claims

Research shows that replacing saturated and trans fat with unsaturated fats can help maintain heart health.

Unfortunately, none of this research involves canola oil so it is not really applicable. In the 1980s, at the urging of health authorities, the food industry went through a similar process and created butter substitutes that utilized oils hydrogenated in a factory. The result was the consumption by the public of large amounts of trans-fats which subsequent research has shown to be great promoter of coronary heart disease. Does it make sense to put our trust in these newer , factory produced ,butter substitutes?

There are NO STUDIES that would indicate substituting canola oil for butter is a heart-healthy choice. Personally, I have grave concerns about consuming a product that has gone through such a tortured process in order to make it appear safe and palatable.

In the Doctor’s Lounge, my butter choice lists pasteurized cream and salt as the ingredients. I like that, it’s simple and straightforward. I know that most studies that have looked at consumption of dairy fat have found that it lowers risk of heart disease. Wholesome Farms is a Sysco, Inc. label and Sysco says

Wholesome Farms farm-fresh cream, eggs and other dairy offerings are typically produced at dairies located closer to our foodservice customers, resulting in fresher, more dependable products with longer shelf lives.

I have tried to contact Sysco to get more information on where my little tub of butter came from and what the cows were fed but have gotten no information.

Choose Nature, not Industry, for good health.

The choice between a highly processed, genetically modified, industry promoted vegetable oil (or blend of oils) which has been manipulated to resemble a healthy natural vegetable oil and never shown to be safe or healthy in humans, versus butter, is clear to me. Give me butter every time. I’m not excited about the fact that I can’t be sure the milk used in this little tub of butter came from pasture-raised, grass-fed cows. However, I realize that compromises have to be made for convenience sometimes. I’d rather eat the butter from unknown cows than the vegetable oil from a known factory.

Egg Nog: Recipe for a Heart Attack or Heart Healthy?

It’s Christmas Eve and you are starting to make merry. Time to break out the egg nog? Or should you eschew this fascinating combination of eggs, dairy and alcohol due to concerns about heart disease?

    eggCardiac deaths increase in frequency in the days around Christmas.

    Could this be related to excessive consumption of egg nog?

    Egg nog is composed of eggs, cream, milk and booze. All of these ingredients have become associated with increased risk of heart disease in the mind of the public.
    Nutritional guidelines advise us to limit egg consumption, especially the yolk, and use low-fat dairy to reduce our risk of heart disease

    A close look at the science, however, suggests that egg nog may actually lower your risk of heart disease.

    Eggs are high in cholesterol but as I’ve discussed in a previous post, cholesterol in the diet is not a major determinant of cholesterol in the blood and eggs have not been shown to increase heart disease risk.

    Full fat dairy contains saturated fat, the fat that nutritional guidelines tell us increases bad cholesterol in the blood and increases risk of heart attacks. But some saturated fats improve your cholesterol profile and organic (grass-fed, see my previous post) milk contains significant amounts of omega-3 fatty acids which are felt to be protective from heart disease.
    Milk and dairy products are associated with a lower risk of vascular disease!

    Whether you mix rum, brandy, or whisky into your egg nog or you drink a glass of wine on the side you are probably lowering your chances of a heart attack compared to your abstemious relatives. Moderate alcohol consumption of any kind is associated with a lower risk of dying from cardiovascular disease compared to no alcohol consumption.

    So, drink your egg nog without guilt this Holiday Season!
    You’re actually engaging in heart healthy behavior.

Organic Milk, Grass-fed Cows and Omega-3 Fatty Acids

The skeptical cardiologist has to admit that when he drinks milk or puts it in his coffee or cooks with it he almost exclusively drinks “organic”, non-homogenized milk obtained from dairy cows which are grass-fed and spend most of their lives grazing in a pasture.. In previous blogs I’ve laid out the evidence that supports that dairy products in general do not increase the risk of heart and vascular disease and, in fact, may lower that risk.

Full fat dairy has gotten a bad rap because it contains high levels of saturated fat. However, just as total fats were inappropriately labeled as bad , it is now clear that all saturated fats are not bad for the heart.

Although I recommend full fat dairy products to my patients I haven’t emphasized the organic or grass-fed aspect because I didn’t think there was enough good evidence that this is healthier than other kinds of milk and it is more expensive. There is evidence from small studies that cows consuming a more natural diet of grass and legumes from a pasture have higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids in their milk than those confined indoors and eating corn.

I keep my eyes (and ears) open for papers in this area.. One such paper appeared in the online peer-reviewed publication PLOS recently. I was driving to the hospital, listening to NPR when I first heard about it. Melissa Block was interviewing NPR correspondent Allison Aubrey . Her take, in a more subdued written form here is similar to many news outlets.

Allison summarized the findings as follows

The researchers compared organic and conventional milk head-to-head. They analyzed about 400 samples over an 18-month period, to account for seasonal differences. And the samples were taken from, you know, all different parts of the country. And they found that organic milk had about 62 percent more of the heart healthy omega-3s, compared to conventional milk.

When asked for an explanation she said

It really comes down to watch what the cows were eating. Organic milk is produced from cows that spend a lot more time out on pasture, and they’re munching on grasses and legumes. And these greens are rich in omega-3 fatty acids. So as a result, the milk they produce has more omega-3 fatty acids.

Wait a minute! I said , you’re confusing “organic” and “grass-fed” or “pasture raised ” they are two totally different things although they can overlap. I totally get the concept of a healthier diet for the cows increasing omega-3s in their milk but I haven’t seen anything that would suggest reducing pesticide or antibiotic usage does that. The radio did not respond. Also, I asked, is it possible to use the term omega-3 without prefacing it with “heart healthy”?

Once you start demanding to know more about the conditions of the cows that made the milk you drink things can become complicated. A cow can be grass-fed but not pasture raised, meaning that it stayed indoors and was fed hay. A cow can be outside “grazing ” but be given corn to eat. Prior to looking at the PLOS one article, I did not assume organic implied anything about how the cows were fed or grazed.

It turns out that in 2010 the USDA announced guidelines that mandated, among other things, for a dairy to be called “organic”, its dairy cows had to spend at least 120 days grazing on pasture.Thus, there is some correlation between organic and pasture raised/grass-fed but not a complete one.

The PLOS one study looked at geographical variation in the difference between organic and conventional milk fatty acid content. Northern California was the only region in which there was no significant difference. The authors speculated that this was because conventional farmers in Norther California usually have cows that roam on the pasture and eat grass and legumes. Thus, it appears the differences between organic and conventional milk are primarily due to what the cows were eating rather than the presence or absence of pesticides, antibiotics, GMOs, or hormones.

Allison Aubrey went on to say

But you know, I should say that there’s a trade-off here because in order to get all these extra omega-3s, you’ve got to drink whole milk. And you know, if you opt for the low-fat dairy – say, 1 percent fat -you’ve skimmed off most of these omega-3s. So the question is, you know, can you afford the extra calories in fat. If you choose the whole milk, you might need to trim a few calories from elsewhere in your diet.

To which I responded “Yes, by all means drink whole milk, there is no evidence that it adds to obesity. You will naturally want less calories down the line and you will get the benefit of good saturated fats.”

I'll continue to pay extra to drink milk from Trader's Point Creamery that I pick up at Whole Foods. I like their milk because I've visited their farm in Indiana and talked to their (plastic surgeon) owner and I like what he says on the website about their milk (ignoring the part about a “better immune system”.

We let our cows graze on 140 acres of pesticide free pasture, which results in milk with more healthy fats like Omega 3 and CLA (conjugated linoleic acid). Grassfed milk also contains more nutrients like beta carotene and vitamins A and E than milk produced using standard feeds. To all of us this means more nourishment and a better immune system for our bodies.

I’m going to end with the summary from the PLOS one article (DMI=dry matter intake, LA=linolenic acid, an omega-6 fatty acid) which emphasizes the importance of grazing and forage-based feeds not the organic aspects of milk.

We conclude that increasing reliance on pasture and forage-based feeds on dairy farms has considerable potential to improve the FA profile of milk and dairy products. Although both conventional and organic dairies can benefit from grazing and forage-based feeds, it is far more common—and indeed mandatory on certified organic farms in the U.S.—for pasture and forage-based feeds to account for a significant share of a cow’s daily DMI. Moreover, improvements in the nutritional quality of milk and dairy products should improve long-term health status and outcomes, especially for pregnant women, infants, children, and those with elevated CVD risk. The expected benefits are greatest for those who simultaneously avoid foods with relatively high levels of LA, increase intakes of fat-containing dairy products, and switch to predominantly organic dairy products.

Yogurt and Your Heart: Part I. The No Fat Frozen Yogurt Scam

tpyogurtYogurt: Heart healthy in its natural state

The Skeptical Cardiologist is a big fan of yogurt. I prefer yogurt in its unadulterated state, 3.5 to 5% milk fat, no sugars added at the factory. Preferably sourced from a local dairy where the cows range freely and eat grass. In this form, yogurt is a very healthy, nutrition-dense, vitamin- enriched food that supplies calcium, essential vitamins, protein and fats.

Yogurt, like all full fat dairy products (with the possible exception of butter) does not increase the risk of heart disease. In fact, some epidemiologic studies show that yogurt consumption is associated with lower risk of heart attacks. It is also associated with less weight gain over time .Because these observational studies can never prove causation we cannot conclude that eating yogurt will reduce our risk of cardiovascular disease or help us lose weight, but certainly there is nothing to suggest that it contributes to heart disease or obesity.

Small prospective, randomized studies (the best kind) show that yogurt consumption may lower blood pressure and raises the good or HDL cholesterol. Again, these studies donʼt prove eating yogurt is healthier but they should make everyone comfortable eating the full fat yogurt.

The Frozen Yogurt Scam: Substitute Sugar and Chemicals for Dairy Fat

Yogurt has a reputation as being a “healthy snack.” Sales of yogurt are increasing rapidly with Greek and frozen yogurt, in particular, showing spectacular growth.

Unfortunately, a great hoax has been perpetrated on the American public. Following advice generated from organizations like the American Heart Association and the USDA government nutritional guidelines, with the idea that they are making healthier choices, Americans are choosing yogurt that is nonfat or low-fat.

When the fat is taken out of yogurt, almost invariably sugar in one form or another is added in by the food industry to enhance flavor and make it palatable.

Shape magazine (Iʼm choosing this magazine as representative of the kind of health information available online and in print on this topic) ran an article with the following headline:

The Healthiest Froyo Orders at Pinkberry, Baskin Robbins, and More Get your frozen yogurt fix without downing an entire mealʼs worth of calories

The teaser line read as follows:

Frozen yogurt may offer a healthier alternative to ice cream, but it can be easy to fall into a calorie trap when you load up on rich flavors and toppings. Check out our cheat sheet to see which froyo combos to order at popular chains. Each one is low in fat and calories—so you can enjoy a guilt-free summer treat!

The number one recommendation was for a sugar and carbohydrate bonanza with the title: “Pinkberry’s Strawberry Classic,” which contains the following nutritional ingredients:

pinkberryNonfat milk, sugar, strawberry flavor (strawberries, sugar, water, natural flavors, fruit and vegetable juice [for color], guar gum, sodium citrate), nonfat yogurt (pasteurized nonfat milk, live and active cultures), nonfat yogurt powder (nonfat milk, culture), fructose, dextrose, natural flavors, citric acid, guar gum, maltodex- trin, mono- and diglycerides, rice starch

Sugar is listed twice and overall there are 23 ingredients that have been added to make this pale imitation of real yogurt palatable. Ironically, Pinkberry claims to have “real” yogurt but the only thing I could tell from their website is the following:

Pinkberry is made with REAL nonfat milk, not from cows treated with rBST hormones, and REAL nonfat yogurt, among many other natural ingredients.

The Shape magazine article recommends you add real strawberries plus a “balsamic glaze” and estimates the total calories as 165 with 144 of which are provided by sugar (36g).

Pinkberry lists the nutritional content for a small cup (5 oz) of pink berry strawberry classic as 110 calories, 22 grams of sugar and 4 grams of protein.

The Skeptical Cardiologist does not recommend this as a “healthy snack” because of the massive amount of sugar, unrefined carbohydrates, and added chemicals. Michael Pollan’s Food Rules are violated multiple times with this ultraprocessed concoction including “Avoid foods with more than 5 ingredients” and” avoid foods which have some form of sugar (or sweetener) listed among the top 3 ingredients”.

Eat Real Food Not Ultraprocessed Industrial Concoctions

photoIn contrast to the typical nonfat frozen yogurt  sugar nightmare, a 5 oz serving of whole milk yogurt from Traders Point Creamery has 90 calories total, 5 grams of fat, 7 total grams of carbohydrate and 5 grams of protein.

There are four ingredients listed on the glass bottle for Traders Point Creamery whole milk yogurt: organic whole milk, organic skim milk, live cultures, and probiotic cultures. The cows are also pastured raised and grass-fed.

This is a yogurt I can recommend.

The food industry routinely presents us with ultra-processed, “food-like” substances that are promoted as more healthy but contain added sugar and refined carbohydrates to enhance taste and promote excess consumption. When we consume sugar added by food processing, we are consuming calories without any nutritional value.

There is no science that tells us that substituting sugar for dairy fat is better for you or for your heart. Several lines of evidence suggest excess consumption of sugar and refined carbohydrates contribute to obesity, inflammation and may increase cardiovascular and chronic disease risk. The high glycemic index and resulting spike in blood sugar may trigger hormonal responses that increase inflammation and fat storage.

America’s obesity epidemic seems to have developed as Americans, following dietary guidelines not based in science, began seeking out low-fat substitutes for real foods. Thus, we have witnessed the explosion of fat-free or low-fat frozen yogurt as food marketers and the obliging “health” media trumpeted the health benefits of these products with no evidence to support the claims.

Being the skeptical cardiologist I have to point out that there has been a shameless, unsubstantiated over-hype of the benefits of yogurt in all sorts of areas including immunity, “digestive health,” bladder cancer, and eczema. I’ll review the health benefits (if any) of the “probiotic” or “prebiotic” features of yogurt and the growth of Greek yogurt in future posts.

Full Disclosure: I have no connections with and receive no support from any food industry sponsored organization. I’m not selling anything. I’m just an unbiased cardiologist seeking the truth so I can make evidence-based recommendations on diet to my patients.  I do eat Traders Point Creamery yogurt and drink their milk but have no other connection to the whole organic yogurt I featured in the pictures.  I have, however, visited their farm and can attest to the fact that the cows are grazing in a pasture and are well treated.

Milk Drinking and Your Risk For Heart Disease

In my previous post, I referenced USDA guidelines which recommend consuming dairy but only in a low-fat form. How did the mainstream nutritional community decide the American public should shift from full fat dairy to low or no fat dairy? Prior to the 1950s there was little concern in nutritional research about fat in the American diet. Beginning in the 1950s, it became apparent that heart disease, coronary artery disease (the cause of heart attacks) in particular, had become the major cause of mortality in western countries.

The American epidemiologist, Ancel Keys, became convinced in the mid 1950s that dietary fat and cholesterol were related to heart disease. In 1970 published his “Seven Countries Study” which found a correlation between per capita fat consumption and the prevalence of heart disease in seven cherry-picked countries. These kinds of studies can be useful for developing theories about which factors might cause disease, however, they cannot prove that a dietary factor causes the disease.

Messerli recently published a tongue-in-cheek analysis of the relationship between per capita chocolate consumption in a particular country and the number of Nobel Laureates produced by that same country that illuminates the weakness of this type of study.
This is the main figure from that study: Chocolate Consumption and Nobel Laureates

There is a very nice relationship demonstrated which suggests that the more chocolate consumed in a particular country, the more Nobel Laureates produced. However, no one would seriously believe that chocolate consumption causes the kind of brilliance needed to do achieve a Nobel prize. Clearly, there are confounding variables or factors. Sometimes, confounding factors are clear and can be accounted for, but often they are not clear and cannot be accounted for.

Early studies of this type demonstrated that there was a relatively strong association between the per capital supply of milk or some component of milk and heart disease mortality. In other studies, changes in gross milk production over time and changes in heart disease deaths were shown to correlate.

Despite the weakness of such studies in proving causation, as Gary Taubes pointed out ,

“the National institute of Health (NIH) had begun (by 1988) advising every American old enough to walk to restrict fat intake, and the president of the American Heart Association (AHA) had told Time magazine that if everyone went along, “we will have (atherosclerosis) conquered” by the year 2000. The Surgeon General’s Office itself had just published its 700-page landmark “Report on Nutrition and Health,” declaring fat the single most unwholesome component of the American diet.”

Such recommendations have resulted in a whole industry devoted to developing low-fat food-like substances which the public has perceived as healthier than the natural high fat original foods. Arguably, adoption of highly processed low-fat foods, which usually increase palatability by adding refined carbohydrates , sugar, or high-fructose corn syrup have contributed to America’s obesity epidemic. This, in turn through increasing obesity-associated diabetes, hypertension, and abnormal lipid profiles could have the unintended consequence of increasing heart disease.

The major focus of low-fat dietary recommendations has been to lower red meat consumption due to the high levels of saturated fat found in pork and beef. However, despite having a significantly different saturated fat composition, dairy products have been tarred with the same brush, so to speak. This has progressed to the point where, if one enters a frozen yogurt establishment (these businesses have proliferated at an alarming rate in the last few years) it is virtually impossible to find a full fat formulation of yogurt. Prominently featured are the words “no-fat” or “low-fat” with the implication that this is healthy for you. Instead of the natural fat of dairy , you have now been convinced to eat a form of dairy that has been highly processed, depleted of most nutrients and full of sugar and unrefined carbohydrates. To make up for the fat calories which might have left you more satiated without sharp peaks in blood glucose, you can substitute a whole panoply of sugary materials, chocolate, candies, or fruit.

It turns out that when the best epidemiological studies are examined in this area, the evidence suggests a protective effect of dairy on heart disease risk. Dr. Peter Elwood, a highly respected epidemiologist at the University of Wales, has consistently pointed this out based on his and other researchers’ studies.
To quote Elwood, the best epidemiological studies are “prospective cohort studies, based on data for individual subjects within a single community, with detailed attention given to confounding” variables. Such studies “give a much better basis for the examination of independent associations between food items and disease incidence than studies based on either ecological data or relationships with risk factors.”

In 2004, Elwood published a review of such studies which was published in the European Journal of Clinical nutrition. He found 10 studies worthy of inclusion. All but one study suggested that milk protects against heart disease. Those subjects consuming the most milk were less likely to have a heart attack or stroke than those consuming no milk. The relative risk for high volume milk drinkers versus those drinking no milk for “ischaemic heart disease” (this refers to coronary artery disease , the major cause of heart attacks) was 0.87. In other words, if you drank a lot of milk you were 13% less likely to have heart disease than if you drank none.

Elwood’s original research on this was called the Caerphilly Prospective Study. Between 1979 and 1983, 2500 men completed a food frequency questionnaire. During the following 21 years, the relative risk in men who drank more than a pint of milk per day, compared with the risk in men who drank no milk was 0.66 for ischemic heart disease and 0.84 for ischaemic stroke. In other words, high milk drinkers were 34% less likely to develop coronary heart disease, the major cause heart attacks.

All the studies reviewed were set up at times when reduced-fat milk was unavailable or scarce therefore the conclusion from the best available evidence in 2004 should have been that full fat dairy lowers your risk of heart attack and stroke.

For both the general public and for my cardiac patients I, therefore, differ strongly in my advice regarding dairy consumption from most published dietary guidelines. Keeping in mind that “all things in moderation” applies just as much in this area as any other, I advise full fat dairy consumption. This means that they can consume butter, milk, full-fat cheese and yogurt. I strongly advise utilizing dairy that comes from grass-fed , pasture-raised cows for reasons I will examine in subsequent posts. Each of these dairy products has a different fatty acid profile and therefore, likely a different effect on cholesterol profiles. Butter, in particular, may warrant separating out from the other dairy products because it is a very highly concentrated fat. However, since reviewing the published data on butter consumption and cardiovascular disease, I have personally gone back to fairly liberally applying butter (again, hopefully from grass-fed, pasture-raised cows) to a lot of my foods because there are few data suggesting that butter raises my risk of cardiovascular disease and the stuff tastes awesome.

Does Eating High-Fat Dairy Cause Heart Disease or Obesity

Dietary guidelines recommend the consumption of milk and dairy products as an important part of a healthy, well-balanced diet The 2010 USDA Guidelines state:
“Milk and milk products contribute many nutrients, such as calcium, vitamin D (for products fortified with vita- min D), and potassium, to the diet. Moderate evidence shows that intake of milk and milk products is linked to improved bone health, especially in children and adolescents. Moderate evidence also indicates that intake of milk and milk products is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes and with lower blood pressure in adults.”

However, dairy fat has been portrayed as the unhealthy component of milk and dairy products, largely because it is energy dense and a rich source of saturated fatty acids . Therefore, typical dietary advice recommends fat-reduced milk and dairy products.

Shockingly, and despite expert and government-backed recommendations, the advice to change to fat-reduced or skim milk and dairy products is not supported by any prospective scientific studies.

The main reason cited for the recommendations is that the consumption of saturated fatty acids is related to an increase in total cholesterol which in turn has been related to increased coronary heart disease-the major cause of heart attacks. As we discuss this topic more, we will discover that this logic is flawed because 1) saturated fats are a diverse family of compounds with varying effects on the cholesterol profile and 2) the cholesterol profile itself is incredibly complex and simple measurements of “bad” (HDL) and “good” (LDL) cholesterol alone probably don’t tell us enough about the risk of heart disease .

Partially as a result of these guidelines, the pattern of dairy fat intake has changed considerably in the last 40 years, a time frame during which the modern obesity epidemic has developed in the United States Butter consumption has dropped considerably and low fat milk has supplanted full fat milk as the preferred product. In parallel, dairy fat consumption from other, possibly less healthy sources such as prepared foods, pizza, industrially produced margarine.

When epidemiologists have scientifically reviewed the relationship between high fat dairy consumption and heart disease or obesity, almost invariably they have found an inverse relationship. That is, the more dairy consumed, the lower the risk of heart disease and the less obesity.

In subsequent posts we’ll look in more detail at the evidence supporting dairy consumption in reducing heart disease and obesity.