Category Archives: Lifestyle and Heart Disease

Atrial Fibrillation In The Time of Coronavirus: A Call For More Personal Remote ECG Monitoring

What is the best strategy for doctors and patients dealing with atrial fibrillation during the COVID-19 pandemic?

Clearly, at this time everyone needs to minimize visits to the doctor’s office, emergency room, urgent care center or hospital. But patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation by definition will have periodic spells during which their heart goes out of rhythm and many of these will occur during this period when we want to minimize contact with individuals outside the home.

In my practice, we are able to manage the majority of these episodes remotely by using a combination of personal ECG monitoring, online cloud ECG review capability, and home adjustment of medications.

Given the presence of coronavirus in the community and the potential for overload of acute care medical resources, outpatient/home management of atrial fibrillation is more important than ever.

I have described in detail in previous posts how we utilize Alivecor’s Kardia device in conjunction with the cloud-based KardiaPro subscription service to manage our afib patients remotely.  (See here and here.) The Apple Watch ECG can also be utilized for this purpose but is more expensive than Kardia and has no online review service.

With this approach we are able to minimize ER visits and hospitalizations. In addition, use of long-term monitors (which also requires a visit to an outpatient center for hook-up) has been greatly reduced.

Given heightened anxiety during the pandemic we are also seeing many patients experiencing palpitations, which are not due to their atrial fibrillation. These can be due to benign premature ventricular contractions or premature atrial contractions.

If an afib patient calls with symptoms of palpitations or rapid heart beat and they have a Kardia device or Apple Watch ECG we can review the recorded ECG, and can quickly make a determination of the cause and best treatment. If they don’t have one of these devices we have no idea what the cause is or the best treatment.

General Advice For Afib Patients 

Obviously, it would be great if patients don’t have episodes of afib during the pandemic.

Paying attention to the eight lifestyle factors which influence afib occurrence I’ve recently posted on is even more important during this stressful period. In particular, afib patients should be limiting the inclination to consume more alcohol and utilizing healthier ways to reduce stress.

Regular exercise has demonstrated benefits in reducing afib episodes and also reduces stress. Gyms are closed or closing, but with spring arriving, outside exercise is always possible. Even if you don’t have exercise equipment in your home there are many exercises you can do inside that provide cardio, strength, and flexibility training. Consider bodyweight exercises, jumping rope, hoping on to a small chair, or go find your old Richard Simmons exercise VHS tape. My wife and I have been enjoying the Seven app lately which takes us through a variety of exercises without the need for equipment. There are tens of thousands of exercise videos on YouTube.

Some afibbers find that meditation or relaxation apps or yoga helps with stress control.

Finally, make sure you have plenty of your prescription medications on hand and that you take them as prescribed without fail. Many pharmacies have home-delivery available for prescriptions.

Regarding medications, please note that good blood pressure control also reduces afib recurrence. Do not stop ACE inhibitors or ARBs as I discussed here.

A Call For More Self Monitoring

Given the importance of staying home right now, afib patients who do not have a method for self monitoring their heart rhythms should consider acquiring a Kardia device or Apple Watch.

Antifibrillatorily Yours,

-ACP

N.B. As I’ve mentioned multiple times I have no connections, financial or otherwise to Apple or Alivecor.

KardiaMobile, the original single lead personal ECG is selling for $84 right now. It’s available also on Amazon.

In my opinion, there is no compelling reason to prefer the Kardia6l, which costs $149 over the single lead KardiaMobile.

Both of these devices work with a Google or iPhone app which is free. To store recorded ECGs on Alivecor’s cloud service requires a subscription fee.

When I enroll my patients into KardiaPro I send them an email invitation which allows them to purchase the KardiaMobile plus have one year of cloud storage and connection to my KardiaPro dashboard for $120. Thereafter the one year KardiaPro service is $60/year.

Apple Watch 5 starts at $399. ECGS are stored in the iPhone app. No cloud storage. ECGs can be emailed as PDF.

Patients with Apple 4 Watches or later can send a PDF of their ECG via email or fax to their cardiologist (https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT208955). Check with your cardiologist if they can view a PDF.

NOTE: Apple has closed all of their retail stores outside of Greater China until March 27. Online stores are open at www.apple.com, or you can download the Apple Store app on the App Store so you can still buy an Apple Watch or an iPhone too.

Cheaper personal ECG devices are available. I’ve reviewed several of these and don’t recommend them. (See here and here.)

Thanks to Mark Goldstein  and Dan Field for review/editing of this post.

How Fat Is The Skeptical Cardiologist?

For some time now the skeptical cardiologist has been obsessed with discovering the best tool to measure body fat.

It’s clear that the fat that gathers around our heart and within our abdomen, so-called visceral fat, has dire consequences for the cardiovascular system.

The standard way of measuring obesity, however, the body mass index doesn’t really tell us with high accuracy what is going on with visceral fat.

You can calculate your BMI using this online calculator. When I plug my numbers in I get a BMI of 22.3 which puts me in the “normal” range according to this chart from the NHLBI.

Screen Shot 2020-02-29 at 7.44.07 AM.png

The BMI, however, is a very crude tool. A high BMI could be the result of a large amount of muscle mass, generally felt to be a good thing.

Conversely, it’s possible to have a normal BMI with a very high visceral fat percentage and low muscle mass. Such patients, the so-called  “skinny fat”  have the same risk as those with obesity as determined by BMI.

Due to perceived limitations of BMI as a predictor of body fat (and therefore true obesity), other methods of estimating body fat and/or visceral fat have been developed.

Waist Circumference and Waist Stature Ratio

Waist circumference (WC) is a simple, inexpensive and reliable test. Some studies have suggested WC correlates with visceral fat better than BMI. Despite recommendations that WC be made a routine measurement along with height and weight, very few doctors (including the skeptical cardiologist) have embraced routine WC measurement.

I measured my WC multiple times and it was always about 33 inches which puts me solidly under the 40-inch cut point for men. One study suggests the WC to stature ratio (WSR)  is superior to WC and that we should aim for a ratio <0.5.

My ratio was slightly under 0.5.

It’s not clear to me that WC or WSR adds enough to BMI to justify performing it on my patients. A 2009 comparison of BMI, WC, and WSR to the gold-standard of dual x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA-scan) found that

BMI, WC, and WSR perform similarly as indicators of body fatness and are more closely related to each other than with percentage body fat

Skinfold Calipers

Using a special caliper it is possible to measure the thickness of the skin at various body locations. These measurements when normalized for age and gender give a fair estimate of body fat.

I purchased one of these devices a few years ago and made measurements on myself and many of my friends. When I added up my skinfold thickness from the anterior and posterior upper arm, the waist, and the shoulder blade regions I obtained a thickness of 29 mm. Using the chart that is shipped with the caliper, my fat % was calculated at 17.9%.

Bioimpedance

Many bathroom scales these days claim to measure fat mass, muscle mass at the same time they are weighing you. Such scales are using bioimpedance to infer body composition.

I have been using a QardioBase for my daily weights which gives me a readout that typically looks like this:

IMG_B59E1EE1756B-1

When I pulled up the chart  below I realized that 24% body fat for men >60 years of age was at the upper range for healthy, bordering on “overfat.”

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If I was a woman, on the other hand, I would be at the bottom end of the healthy range, bordering on “underfat.”

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How Fat Am I?

After utilizing the commonly available modalities for assessing body fat, visceral fat, and obesity do we truly know how fat the skeptical cardiologist is?

BMI puts him solidly in the normal range.

Waist circumference puts him solidly in the normal range.

Waist to status ratio puts him close to obese.

Skinfold calipers give him normal body fat for age of 17.9%.

A  bioimpedance scale gives him 24% body fat, bordering on “overfat.”

After undergoing a test last week I believe I can answer the burning question with confidence. More importantly, I believe I now have a convenient, inexpensive, and highly accurate tool that will provide precise estimates of my patient’s visceral body fat.

Empowered with such knowledge, hopefully, we can more successfully identify and treat cardiometabolic disease.

Staytunedly Yours,

-ACP

N.B. That is not my abdomen in the featured image.

Six Things Employees Should Know About Nutritional Supplements – Courtesy of Quizzify

The skeptical cardiologist recently received an email from Al Lewis, who continues to do great work on his blog and with his company, Quizzify. The email quizzed me about supplements, a topic I’ve written about extensively.

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The linked article is well worth reading and should be required reading for all employers and employees. If there are any CEOs or HR officers in my readership take note and consider changing your approach to employee wellness.


Six Things Employees Should Know

The vast majority of your employees take nutritional supplements, whose consumption just reached an all-time high. That increase means someone, somewhere – maybe even your very own wellness vendor – is telling them this is a good idea.

Or maybe they are thinking: “Hey, what harm can they do?”

Plenty, as it turns out.

Here are six things employees should know about nutritional supplements.

1. Virtually all the benefits of supplements with virtually none of the risk can be achieved by taking a regular multivitamin

There is plenty of evidence for the health benefits of virtually all vitamins and minerals and even a couple of supplements, so much evidence that we have room to highlight only a few.

Examples include fish oil for menopausal women with dry eye or possibly people at high risk of heart attack. Or folic acid for pregnant women and iron for pregnant women who are anemic. Or Vitamin D for people who have dark skin, live in cloudy climates, avoid all sun exposure and/or don’t each much dairy. And of course, Vitamin B12 for vegans. (Vitamin B12 is found only in animal products.)

Women likely benefit from small combined extra amounts of calcium and Vitamin D…but as noted below, don’t overdo it.

The 10% of the population who drink to excess really should be taking daily multivitamins. This is partly because alcohol interferes with absorption, and partly because they aren’t getting enough calories from real foods.

With these exceptions, most people should be getting enough vitamins in a balanced diet, but a few cents a day of an “insurance” multivitamin pays for itself just in the psychological benefit of not worrying about that. However, the story changes when we talk about megavitamins, and especially when we talk about other supplements.

2. Almost every megavitamin which once showed “promise” in fighting cancer, heart disease, etc. doesn’t. Quite the opposite, they may cause harm.

Niacin, once thought to have magical properties against heart attacks, has been completely debunked. Vitamin E supplements could prevent cancer in some women but cause it in others, depending on genes. Men who are concerned about prostate cancer (meaning all of us) should specifically avoid Vitamin E supplements, which likely increase the odds of it. Vitamin D in large quantities is the latest to be debunked, just last month. Taking too much may cause osteoporosis, rather than prevent it.

And monitor your own wellness vendors. Interactive Health, for example, tests every employee for anemia. This is contrary to the advice of clinical guidelines, which oppose anemia screening except for pregnant women, where evidence is mixed. Employees who then take iron supplements risk stomach pain, nausea, vomiting and serious long-term complications.

The good news? It is possible large amounts of Vitamin C do offer modest benefits with respect to common colds, and that those possible benefits outweigh the possible harms. But just large amounts, like 200-400 mg., not massive amounts — and not so large that you need pills.

3. If you have to go to GNC to obtain a supplement, or order it through the mail, it has no value and may cause harm.

CVS and Whole Foods want to make money too, and fancy supplements are expensive high-margin items. So if a supplement has even the slightest inkling of value, they’ll stock it.

As a random example we picked because we like the name, consider horny goatweed, as a treatment for erectile dysfunction (ED). Along with the name, it also has a great back story, something about Mongolian herders observing goats getting aroused after grazing on it.

It is actually proven to work, and not just on goats. It also works on rats. For the rest of us, there is zero evidence. Plus, ED is one of those conditions where, if something worked, we’d know about it by now.

At least the likelihood of harm is pretty low to other than your wallet.

4. There is no such thing as FDA approval for supplements

Supplements are notorious for lax quality control, unproven health claims, and contamination. Did we mention unproven claims? The FDA has no say in the matter of unfounded health claims.

It’s also not entirely clear that these pills contain the ingredients they claim to contain in the quantities they profess to contain. These supplements turn out to be much harder to manufacture to specs than regular synthetically derived pills.

5. They may interact with “real” drugs you are taking

Just because supplements are derived from natural sources doesn’t mean they don’t act like real drugs inside your body. And, like real drugs, they can interact with other drugs. For instance, if you are taking Vitamin E and Advil or Advil PM or a baby aspirin, your risk of bleeding profusely in an accident goes way, way up, because all are blood thinners. The risk isn’t just accidents — small everyday bruises may become big bruises.

Make sure you list supplements when describing to your doctor what you take…though it’s questionable whether (aside from the basics, like that blood-thinning example) the doctor would be aware of these interactions. There are too many to track, and some interactions simply aren’t studied.

It all comes back to this: a one-a-day multivitamin/mineral supplement is more than enough for most people. Not just for the benefits, but for avoidance of the risk of interaction, side effects and unknown long-term impacts.

6. One other “supplement” benefits almost every body system and has no side effects

You guessed it – exercise, the key to health and longevity. If there were a dietary supplement that provided even a small fraction of the benefits of exercise, we’d know about it by now.

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I agree with Al on most everything above except I don’t recommend a multivitamin to my patients. I think a good, balanced diet provides all the vitamins, minerals and unknown nutrients for the vast majority of individuals.

After reviewing the literature I wouldn’t recommend supplementing Vitamin C to prevent colds. I agree with the conclusions from a recent review which admitted there may be a slight benefit from Vitamin C supplements in reducing the severity and duration of the common cold

the practical significance of these findings is not very convincing. It does not seem reasonable to ingest additional vitamin C outside of dietary intake throughout the year if the only benefit is the potential for a slightly shortened cold duration and lessened symptoms.

The National Institutes of Health recommend daily intake of 90 mg of vitamin C for males and 75 mg for females with a focus on getting those amounts from dietary sources, namely, fruits and vegetables. Citrus fruits are a great source of vitamin C. A medium orange has 70 mg of vitamin C, and a medium grapefruit has 78 mg of vitamin C. The National Institutes of Health suggests that consuming 5 varied servings of fruits and vegetables daily can provide more than 200 mg of vitamin C. Supplementation may be needed for those specific patients with marginal vitamin C status such as the elderly and chronic smokers, but the majority of the population should focus on getting vitamin C from their diet.

Inquisitively Yours,

-ACP

Source: Six things employees should know about nutritional supplements – Quizzify

N.B. I have no connection, financial or otherwise, with Quizzify but I did try to get my hospital to consider switching to them from the rather silly wellness vendor we currently have.

This promotional material appears at the end of Al’s article.

Quizzify provides the education employees need to be health-literate, wiser and more confident healthcare consumers

Teach employees how to navigate the ins and outs of their health benefits and gain valuable information about better health practices. With quizzes reviewed by doctors at Harvard Medical School, Quizzify helps employees live healthier lives and save money on healthcare… without collecting any private health information.

Benefits are of no value if employees don’t use them. You can customize Quizzify so that your quiz questions can explain exactly what the value is…and our “learn more” links can point employees to exactly where they need to go.

Eight Lifestyle Changes All Patients Should Make To Reduce The Recurrence Of Atrial Fibrillation

Previously, the skeptical cardiologist answered the question “Why Did I Go Into Atrial fibrillation?

An equally important question is “how can I reduce the chances that I have more spells of atrial fibrillation (AF)?”

I spend a fair amount of time discussing with my AF patients what lifestyle changes they can make in this regard. I’ve discovered, however, that many AF patients I am seeing for a second opinion seem unaware of the changes they can make to minimize AF recurrence.

Herein I give you the eight most important changes you can make to minimize both the onset and the recurrence of AF.

  1. Eliminate or substantially reduce alcohol.
  2. Lose weight if you are obese.
  3. Stop smoking. Stopping is associated with a 36% lower risk of AF.
  4. Get your blood pressure under good control.
  5. Get regular aerobic exercise. At least 150 minutes of moderate cardio exercise weekly.
  6. Eat A Healthy Diet. Don’t Eat Crap (as Younger Next Year says). In general, because obesity is such a big factor  in AF, I am fine with whatever diet plan has you at a BMI <28. Healthy diets controlling weight avoid ultra-processed foods, sugar-sweetened beverages, and minimize white rice, pasta, pastries, and potatoes. These diets include lots of fresh vegetables, nuts, olive oil, and fish. Full fat yogurt and cheese are fine in moderation. Eat real food, mostly plants, not too much as Michael Pollan has famously said.
  7. Get high-quality sleep. This means treating any sleep apnea properly in addition to standard advice for getting a good night’s sleep. The risk of AF is four times higher in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) independent of other confounding variables
  8. Reduce stress. Easier said than done I know. Everything from meditation to Yoga to retiring or cutting back at work to psychotherapy can be tried in this category. Go with whatever works for you. Knowing when you are in or out of AF by utilizing personal ECG monitoring devices may help reduce stress, especially if used under physician supervision.

Let’s dig a little deeper into some specific recent evidence on three which have a huge impact: alcohol, exercise, and obesity.

Alcohol and Atrial Fibrillation

In March, I wrote about the alcohol AF trial recently published in NEJM:

The Alcohol-AF Trial. Binge alcohol consumption (holiday heart) can trigger atrial fibrillation (AF) and observational studies show a higher incidence of AF with higher amounts of alcohol consumption.

This trial was the first-ever randomized controlled trial of alcohol abstinence in moderate drinkers with paroxysmal AF (minimum 2 episodes in the last 6 months) or persistent AF requiring cardioversion.

Participants consumed >/= 10 standard drinks per week and were randomized to abstinence or usual consumption.

Participants underwent comprehensive rhythm monitoring with implantable loop recorders or existing pacemakers and twice-daily AliveCor monitoring for 6 months.

Abstinence prolonged AF-free survival by 37% (118 vs 86 days) and lowered the AF burden from 8.2% to 5.6%

AF related hospitalizations occurred in 9% of abstinence patients versus 20% of controls

Participants in the abstinence arm also experienced improved symptom severity, weight loss and BP control.

This trial gives me precise numbers to present to my AF patients to show them how important eliminating alcohol consumption is if they want to have fewer AF episodes. The study further emphasizes lifestyle changes (including weight loss, exercise, and stress-reduction) can dramatically reduce the incidence of atrial fibrillation.

Obesity and Atrial Fibrillation

We have known for some time of a strong association between obesity and atrial fibrillation. We also know we can make sheep go into atrial fibrillation by making them obese and creating a diseased, fat-infiltrated left atrium.

More recently we have solid evidence that sustained weight reduction can significantly reduce the recurrence of AF.

The Australian LEGACY study took 355 AF AF patients with BMI>27 and offered them a weight management program:

Weight loss was categorized as group 1 (≥ 10%), group 2 (3% to 9%), and group 3 (<3%). Weight trend and/or fluctuation was determined by yearly follow-up. Endpoints included impact on the AF severity scale and 7-day ambulatory monitoring.

Weight loss ≥ 10% resulted in a 6-fold  greater probability of no AF recurrences compared with the other 2 groups. High weight fluctuation doubled the risk of AF recurrence.

Of course, all these factors are interrelated. Exercise, diet, stress, alcohol consumption, and sleep quality all impact weight control and obesity. Patients with AF should be working on all 8 levers for optimal benefit.

Given the LEGACY study findings, if you have AF and are obese, you should be using all lifestyle factors at your disposal to get your body weight down >10%. Do this in a slow and steady fashion with lifestyle changes that are sustainable for the rest of your life. You want to lose that weight and keep it off.

Exercise And AF

The most compelling evidence for the independent role of exercise in reducing AF comes from a Norwegian study of 51 patients with AF who were randomized either to aerobic interval training (AIT) or to their regular exercise habits. The patients randomized to AIT engaged in four 4-minute bouts of high-intensity (85 to 95% peak heart rate) aerobic exercise interspersed with 3 minutes of recovery.

There was a significant reduction in AF burden (measured by implanted loop recorders) in the exercise group, with the mean time in AF dropping from 8.1% to 4.8%, with no significant change in the control group. Patients in the exercise group experienced fewer and less severe symptoms whereas the non-exercising, control group had no change. In comparison with controls, patients randomly assigned to exercise also increased their peak oxygen consumption (Vo2peak), cardiac function, and quality of life, while improving body mass index and blood lipids

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Atrial fibrillation (AF) burden in patients with AF during the study. Mean time in AF was measured by an implanted loop recorder (n=36) before, during, and after 12 weeks of aerobic interval training (exercise) or usual care (control). Patients without AF during the study period are excluded. Mean changes from baseline to follow up were −6.2±8.9 percentage points (pp), P=0.02 for exercise; 4.8±12.5 pp, P=0.09 for control; and 11.0±3.9 pp, P=0.007 between groups. Error bars show the 95% confidence interval.

An accompanying editorial provides this graphic on the benefits of exercise training in AF

 

For all you readers without AF you can minimize your chances of developing AF by following these lifestyle recommendations.

Afibrillatorily Yours,

-ACP

N.B. A PDF summary of the 8 factors is available here (Lifestyle changes Afib)

N.B.2 For those wishing to mimic the Norwegian AIT protocol here is the complete description:

Endurance training was performed as walking or running on a treadmill 3 times a week for 12 weeks. Each session started with a 10-minute warmup at 60% to 70% of maximal heart rate obtained at exercise testing (HRpeak), followed by four 4-minute intervals at 85% to 95% of HRpeak with 3 minutes of active recovery at 60% to 70% of HRpeakbetween intervals, ending with a 5-minute cooldown period. During AF, patients exercised at the same treadmill speed and inclination as in the previous sessions in sinus rhythm, with the Borg scale of 6 to 20 as an aid to control intensity. When familiar with the training regimen, patients were allowed to perform 1 exercise per week at home, where exercise intensity was documented with a heart rate monitor (RS300X, Polar Electro, Kempele, Finland).

 

 

 

 

This Week’s Most Ridiculous Heart Health Headline: “Running One Marathon Can Make Your Arteries Healthier”

Yes, CNBC went with that silly headline.

ABC went with “Training For Your 1st Marathon May Reverse Aging.”

The usually reliable Allison Aubrey and NPR went with ” Ready For Your First Marathon? Training Can Cut Years Off Your Cardiovascular Age.”

Aaarggh! As the newly-minted wife of the skeptical cardiologist likes to say.

The media threw caution to the wind and went gaga over this study which proves nothing of the sorts of things described above.

They may have been egged on by the authors who were wildly overstating the implications of the study

“What we found in this study is that we’re able to reverse the processes of aging that occur in the [blood] vessels,” says study author Dr. Anish Bhuva, a British Heart Foundation Cardiology Fellow at Barts Heart Centre in the UK..

Allison Aubrey did manage to quote a sensible person in her report to counter the balderdash being thrown around by the study authors:

The heart health benefits documented in the study likely have much less to do with the one-time race event than they do with the fact that the training program got people in the habit of regular, moderately intense exercise, says exercise researcher Dr. Tim Church, an adjunct professor at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center. On average, the participants ran between 6 and 13 miles per week, during their training, so, not super long distances.”The training program was very practical and very doable,” says Church, who was not involved in the study, but who reviewed the training regimen and results for NPR. “It was a slow build up over six months,” Church says.

I know a thing or two about aortic distensibility. In 1992 I described a new noninvasive method for quantification of aortic elastic properties in a paper published in the American Heart Journal entitled “Evaluation of aortic distensibility with transesophageal echocardiography.”

One thing I know for sure is aortic distensibility is highly dependent on systolic blood pressure and any changes that were seen in this study could simply have been related to lower systolic blood pressure.

The authors acknowledge this limitation along with about a million other limitations at the end of their paper. The limitations are legion and I’ve copied them at the end of this post. I’m quite surprised that JACC published it given those limitations and the absence of any important new findings.

Taking up exercise is really good for you but do not be fooled by these ridiculous headlines into thinking running one marathon has any special way to make you younger.

Take up exercise that you can sustain and that won’t leave you injured or frustrated.

Pheidippidesically Yours,

-ACP

Study limitations

This study was conducted in healthy individuals; therefore, our findings may not apply to patients with hypertension who have stiffer arteries that may be less modifiable (40). From these data, however, those with higher SBP at baseline appeared to derive greater benefit. This study was not designed to provide structured training, but rather to observe the effects of real-world preparation for a marathon, which randomized control trials cannot address. Nevertheless, information on the intensity, frequency, and type of exercise training would have been valuable to understand further the beneficial effects on aortic stiffness. The modest change in peak VO2 may be related to exercise training intensity or low adherence, which reflects the real world. Peak VO2 was performed semisupine to allow concurrent echocardiography, and this may also have reduced sensitivity to changes due to running or running efficiency. We assessed only marathon finishers—plausibly, nonfinishers could have had different vascular responsiveness. The causal link of exercise to measured changes is only inferred—marathon training may lead to other lifestyle modifications (dietary, other behavioral factors), or alterations in lipid profiles and glucose metabolism, although these have not been previously associated with changes in aortic stiffness (11). We did not examine the effect of exercise on peripheral arteries or endothelial dysfunction. Although individual participants served as internal controls, there may have been run-in bias for the initial BP measurement. This appears unlikely, as BP changes would not have been age-related nor correlated with the change in separate measures (e.g., aortic stiffness) with training. Estimated aortic ages are approximations and are based on the same dataset at baseline rather than independent observations. The exercise dose-response curve here is not sampled—only training for a first-time marathon with single timepoint assessment. This area warrants further study. We measured distensibility on modulus imaging acquired at 1.5-T rather than steady-state free precession imaging. The free-breathing sequence we used achieved good temporal resolution, but may be susceptible to through-plane motion. However, this and similar sequences correlate well with breath-held cine imaging, and show similar associations with aging (18). If error was introduced into distensibility measurements related to through-plane motion, the resultant noise would minimize the effect size related to exercise training, and therefore would be unlikely to account for our key findings. PP undergoes amplification from central to more peripheral locations, typically being ∼6 mm Hg higher in the descending thoracic than the ascending aorta (20). This PP amplification is not accounted for in our analysis, because it would have involved invasive measures of aortic pressure at each location. A sensitivity analysis suggested that the likely impact of this effect on the observed changes after training would be minimal; however, we cannot completely exclude the possibility that changes in PP amplification contribute to the observed differences. Diaphragmatic descending aortic distensibility data reported here were, however, higher than expected, although there is limited published data for comparison (41). Unlike Voges et al. (41), central rather than brachial PP was used, which would explain greater distensibility, and the use of 1.5-T phase-contrast modulus may accentuate image contrast differences between 3T gradient echo sequences.

 

The Distortion of The Death of Dr. Robert Atkins Continues

Three years ago I carefully researched the details of the death of Robert Atkins and wrote about it on this blog. I was motivated by the grossly inaccurate portrayal of him promulgated on vegan and plant-based websites. Elsewhere on this website I have described in detail the death of Nathan Pritikin whose ultra-low fat diet stands in stark contrast to Atkins’ ultra-low carb diet.

The most important point I hoped to make was that we should not judge the benefits of any diet based on how the founder of that diet dies. There is far too much randomness in death and far too much genetic influence over our health to base dietary decisions on one man ( or woman’s) mode of departing existence.

Atkins suffered a completely random event slipping and falling on ice and suffering an epidural hematoma. Pritikin developed leukemia and died after committing suicide.

Unfortunately my article did not end the misinformation rampant on the internet about Atkins so I’m reposting it today for all of you who may be feeling guilty about eating too much on Thanksgiving yesterday.

One of the characters in my story, Michael Bloomberg, has recently announced that he is running for President.


In the spring of 2003 at the age of 72 years, Robert Atkins, the cardiologist and  controversial promoter of high fat diets for weight loss, fell  on the sidewalk in front of his Atkins Center for Complementary Medicine in Manhattan.  He lost his footing on a patch of ice, slipped and banged his head on the pavement.  At the time of his fall his book ”Dr. Atkins’ New Diet Revolution” lead the NY times paper-back best seller list.

He was taken to nearby Cornell Medical Center where a clot was evacuated from his brain. Thereafter he lapsed into a coma and he spent 9 days in the ICU, expiring on April 17, 2003.

screen-shot-2016-11-27-at-8-44-55-amThe cause of death was determined by the New York Medical Examiner to be “blunt injury of head with epidural hematoma.”

An epidural hematoma is a collection of blood between the skull and the tough outer lining of the brain (the dura) which can occur with blunt trauma to the head which results in laceration of the arteries in this area. It is a not  uncommon cause of death in trauma . Actress Natasha Richardson (skiing, see below)  died from this. Nothing about the manner in which Robert Atkins died would suggest that he was a victim of his own diet any more than  Natasha Richardson was.

However, within the year a campaign of misinformation and deception spear-headed by  evangelistic vegans would try to paint the picture that Atkins died as a direct result of what they perceived as a horribly dangerous diet.

Michael Bloomberg, then New York major,  was quoted as saying

“I don’t believe that bullshit that [Atkins] dropped dead slipping on the sidewalk.”

According to the Smoking Gun:

“The 61-year-old billionaire added that Atkins was “fat” and served “inedible” food at his Hamptons home when Bloomberg visited. The mayor’s inference, of course, was that Atkins was actually felled by his meat-heavy diet, that his arteries were clogged with beef drippings. “

Enter The Vegans

Richard Fleming, a physician promoting prevention of cardiovascular disease through vegetarianism and with close ties to an organization  called Physicians Committe for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) sent a letter to the NY Medical Examiner requesting a copy of the full medical examination of Atkins. The NYME office  should have only issued copies of this report to physicians involved in the care of Atkins or next of kin but mistakenly complied with this request.  Fleming, who would subsequently publish his own low fat diet book, conveniently gave the report to PCRM which is directed by animal rights and vegan physicians.

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From the front page of pcrm.org. The two major concerns of the group are converting everyone to veganism and animal rights.

Neal Barnard, the President of PCRM, in an incredibly unethical move sent the letter to the Wall Street Journal with the hope that the information would destroy the popularity of the Atkins diet, a diet he clearly despises..  Barnard said the group decided to publicize the report because Atkins’ “health history was used to promote his terribly unhealthy eating plan..” The WSJ subsequently published an article summarizing the findings.

To this day, advocates of vegetarianism and low fat diets, distort the findings of Atkins’ Medical Examination in order to depict high fat diets like his as dangerous and portray Atkins as a victim of his own diet.

To scientists and thoughtful, unbiased physicians it is manifestly apparent that you cannot base decisions on what diet plan is healthy or effective for weight loss on the outcome of one patient. It doesn’t matter how famous that one person is or whether he/she originated and meticulously followed the diet. It is a ludicrous concept.

Would you base your decision to engage in running  based on the death of Jim Fixx?  Fixx  did much to popularize the sport of running and the concept of jogging as a source of health benefit and weight loss. He died while jogging, in fact. An autopsy concluded that he died of a massive heart attack and found advanced atherosclerosis (blockage) of the arteries to his heart.

Fixx inherited his predisposition to heart disease and couldn’t run himself out of it. Multiple studies over the years have documented the benefit of regular aerobic exercise like running on longevity and cardiovascular risk.

Would you based your decision to engage in  a very low fat diet based on how Nathan Pritikin died?  Pritikin authored an extremely popular book emphasizing eliminating fat from the diet but developed leukemia and slashed his wrists,  committing suicide at the age of 69 years. Would vegetarians accept the premise that their preferred diet results in leukemia or suicidal depression based on Pritikin’s death?

The Distortion of Atkins Death

The NYME report lists Atkins weight at autopsy as 258 pounds. Low-fat zealots seized on this fact as indicating that Atkins was screen-shot-2016-12-17-at-5-32-56-ammorbidly obese throughout his life.  For example, a  you-tube video of an audio interview of Atkinas online posted by “plant-based coach”  has this obviously photoshopped head of Atkins put on the body of a morbidly obese man. Atkins actually weight around 200 pounds through most of his life and a hospital note on admission showed him weighing 195 pounds. A substantial weight gain of 63 pounds occurred in the 9 days after his admission due to the accumulation of fluid volume and swelling which is not uncommon in the critically ill.

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No autopsy was performed on Atkins but the NYME wrote on the document that he had “h/o of MI, CHF, HTN.”

MI is the acronym for a myocardial infarction or heart attack. As far as we can tell without access to full medical records, Atkins never had an MI. He did have a cardiac arrest in 2002. While most cardiac arrests are due to a cardiac arrhythmia secondary to an MI they can also occur in patients who have a cardiomyopathy or weakness in the heart muscle from causes other than MI.

In fact, USA Today reported that Stuart Trager, MD,  chairman of the Atkins Physicians Council in New York, indicated that Atkins was diagnosed with a cardiomyopathy at the time of his cardiac arrest and that it was not felt to be due to blocked coronary arteries/MI. Cardiomyopathy can be caused by viral infections or nonspecific inflammation of the heart muscle and would have nothing to do with diet.

Trager also stated that Atkins, as a result of the cardiomyopathy, had developed heart failure (CHF) and the pumping ability of his heart (ejection fraction) had dropped to 15% to 20%. While CHF can be due to heart attacks causing heart weakness in Atkins case it appears it was unrelated to fatty blockage of the coronary arteries causing MI and therefore likely not related  to his diet.

What Does Atkins Death Tell Us About His Diet 

The information about Atkins death tells us nothing about the effectiveness or dangers of his diet.  In one individual it is entirely likely that a genetic predisposition to cancer or heart disease overwhelms whatever beneficial effects the individual’s lifestyle may have had. Thus, we should never rely on the appearance or the longevity of  the primary promoter of a diet for the diet’s effectiveness.

The evangelists of low-fat, vegan or vegetarian diets like PCRM have shamelessly promoted misinformation about Atkins death to dismiss high fat diets and promote their own agenda. If their diets are truly superior it should be possible to utilize facts and science to promote them rather than a sensationalistic, distorted focus on the body of one man who slipped on the ice and fell to his death.

Epidurally Yours

-ACP

Recent Papers Support The Cardiometabolic Health Benefits Of Full Fat Yogurt

A recent  Marion Nestle post,  Industry-funded studies of the week: Yogurt highlights three papers which strongly support the health benefits of consuming full fat dairy-in particular yogurt.

Nestle does a great job of highlighting food industry ties to nutritional research and publications on her excellent website Food Politics and in her books including “Unsavory Truth: How Food Companies Skew the Science of What We Eat.”

She notes that publication of these yogurt papers was paid for by a big player in the yogurt industry:

These three papers were part of a supplement to Advances in Nutrition published in September 2019: Supplement—6th Yogurt in Nutrition Initiative (YINI) Summit / More than the Sum of Its Parts, sponsored by Danone Institutes International. Publication costs for this supplement were defrayed in part by the payment of page charges.

Yes, these three papers were published in a supplement sponsored by the yogurt industry and therefore must be taken with a grain of salt.

However, a totally unbiased look at the data on yogurt and cardiovascular disease which I have provided here and here comes to the same conclusion. Misguided attempts to make full fat yogurt healthier by eliminating dairy fat have created artificial sugar-laden monstrosities which are actually stealth desserts.

It’s interesting that the dairy industry has been complicit in promoting the idea that low fat dairy is healthier because (as I pointed out here) it allows them to double dip the milk cash cow-skimming off the healthy fat and selling the separated fat and the residual skim milk separately.

The second paper ( Dairy Foods, Obesity, and Metabolic Health: The Role of the Food Matrix Compared with Single Nutrients) was based on a talk that Dariush Mozaffarian gave at the American Society of Nutrition 2018 Congress. I’ve been following Mozaffarian’s work since 2012 and I consider him to be an excellent researcher, writer and thinker who can be trusted to present unbiased information. The content of that talk presented by him at a national scientific congress in front of his academic colleagues is unlikely to be biased.

Here is what he concludes:

The present evidence suggests that whole-fat dairy foods do not cause weight gain, that overall dairy consumption increases lean body mass and reduces body fat, that yogurt consumption and probiotics reduce weight gain, that fermented dairy consumption including cheese is linked to lower CVD risk, and that yogurt, cheese, and even dairy fat may protect against type 2 diabetes. Based on the current science, dairy consumption is part of a healthy diet, without strong evidence to favor reduced-fat products; while intakes of probiotic-containing unsweetened and fermented dairy products such as yogurt and cheese appear especially beneficial.”

It’s important to look at the disclosures for any scientific paper and Mozzafarian has a lot of industry ties to disclose:

DM received an honorarium from the American Society of Nutrition for the preparation of this manuscript. A freelance science writer, Denise Webb, was supported by Danone Institute International to prepare an initial draft of this manuscript for DM based on a recording of his talk and slides at the American Society of Nutrition 2018 Congress. The final manuscript was edited in detail and approved by DM. The funders had no role in the design, analysis, interpretation, review, or final approval of the manuscript for publication…DM reports research funding from the NIH and the Gates Foundation; personal fees from GOED, Nutrition Impact, Pollock Communications, Bunge, Indigo Agriculture, Amarin, Acasti Pharma, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, and America’s Test Kitchen; scientific advisory board, Elysium Health (with stock options), Omada Health, and DayTwo; and chapter royalties from UpToDate; all outside the submitted work.”

The lead author of the third paper Nestle’ highlights ( Effects of Full-Fat and Fermented Dairy Products on Cardiometabolic Disease: Food Is More Than the Sum of Its Parts.)  is Arne Astrup another nutritional writer/researcher who I have a ton of respect for. He’s written extensively on the topic of saturated fat and dairy in multiple publications which were not tied to the dairy industry in any way.

Astrup concludes:

 “Although more research is warranted to adjust for possible confounding factors and to better understand the mechanisms of action of dairy products on health outcomes, it becomes increasingly clear that the recommendation to restrict dietary saturated fat to reduce risk of cardiometabolic disease is getting outdated. Therefore, the suggestion to restrict or eliminate full-fat dairy from the diet may not be the optimal strategy for reducing cardiometabolic disease risk and should be re-evaluated in light of recent evidence.”

His disclosures are extensive but they reveal how wide-ranging his interests are and how dedicated he is to optimizing diet.

AA is a member of advisory boards/consultant for BioCare Copenhagen, Denmark; Dutch Beer Institute, Netherlands; Gelesis, United States; Groupe Éthique et Santé, France; McCain Foods Limited, United States; Novo Nordisk, Denmark; Pfizer, United States; Saniona, Denmark; and Weight Watchers, United States. AA has received travel grants and honoraria as a speaker for a wide range of Danish and international consortia. AA is co-owner and member of the board of the consultancy company Dentacom Aps, Denmark; cofounder and co-owner of UCPH spin-outs Mobile Fitness A/S, Flaxslim ApS, and Personalized Weight Management Research Consortium ApS (Gluco-diet.dk). He is coinventor of a number of patents owned by the University of Copenhagen, in accordance with Danish law. He is coauthor of a number of diet and cookery books, including books on personalized diet approaches. AA is not an advocate or activist for specific diets and is not strongly committed to any specific diet.”

I love what he says at the end of his disclosure statement

“AA is not an advocate or activist for specific diets and is not strongly committed to any specific diet.”

Hooray! That is exactly what we need in the world of dietary recommendations.

I am particularly heartened by the conclusions of these two illustrious international nutritional authorities who have managed to cut through the long-standing nutritional dogma that all saturated fat is bad. As one who has no ties to any food or medical industry group and who is not an advocate or activitist for specific diets I concluded as they have that

  1.  Based on the current science, dairy consumption is part of a healthy diet, without strong evidence to favor reduced-fat products; while intakes of probiotic-containing unsweetened and fermented dairy products such as yogurt and cheese appear especially beneficial.”
  2. It becomes increasingly clear that the recommendation to restrict dietary saturated fat to reduce risk of cardiometabolic disease is getting outdated. Therefore, the suggestion to restrict or eliminate full-fat dairy from the diet may not be the optimal strategy for reducing cardiometabolic disease risk and should be re-evaluated in light of recent evidence.”

As I wrote in my letter to the FDA and in a recent critique of the AHA I would change the verbiage to “the suggestion to restrict or eliminate full-fat dairy from the diet is not a proven strategy for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity or diabetes and should be eliminated from current dietary guidelines.”

Two key points that these papers help emphasize:

  1. Eating fat doesn’t make you fat
  2. All saturated fat is not bad for your heart

It is important to look at industry influence on research and publications (along with other biases)  but it is hard to find an expert in these areas who hasn’t had some industry ties. Part of these ties develop because researchers who have concluded a particular food is healthy based on their independent review of the literature will be sought after as a speaker at conferences organized by the support groups for that food.

Fortunately, my evaluations remain unsullied by any food industry ties and, like Dr. Astrup, I am not an advocate or activist for specific diets and I am not not strongly committed to any specific diet.

Skeptically Yours,

-ACP

N.B. Trader’s Point Creamery Yogurt no longer distributes their wonderful products. I’ve started consuming Maple Hill 100% grass fed full fat yogurt and it is quite good.

N.B. #2.Arne Astrup’s bio.

Prof. Arne Astrup is Head of the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports at the University of Copenhagen, and Senior Consultant at Clinical Research Unit, Herlev-Gentofte University Hospital. Astrup attained his medical degree from UCPH in 1982 and a Doctorate in Medical Science in 1986. He was Appointed Professor of Nutrition and Head of the Research Department of Human Nutrition at The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Denmark, in 1990, he led the department throughout its development ever since.

His researches focus on the physiology and pathophysiology of energy and substrate metabolism and appetite regulation, with special emphasis on the etiology and treatment of obesity, including the role of diet composition and of specific  nutrients, lifestyle modification, very-low-calorie diets, exercise, and medication. Major research collaborations include participation in the EU multicenter studies.
He led research that showed that GLP-1 is a satiety hormone in humans, and was instrumental in Denmark being the first country to ban industrial trans-fat in 2014. He is author/co-author of over 600 original, review and editorial scientific papers and more than 1000 other academic publications such as abstracts, textbook chapters and scientific correspondence. He has supervised 32 PhD students to date.

Darius Mozzafarian’s bio (Wikipedia)

Dariush Mozaffarian (born August 19, 1969) is an American cardiologist, Dean and Jean Mayer Professor at the Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University, and Professor of Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine.

Mozaffarian is the author of nearly 400 scientific publications and has served as an adviser for the US and Canadian governments, American Heart Association, World Health Organization, and the United Nations.

It’s National Coffee Day-Let’s Celebrate The Health Benefits Of Java!

The skeptical cardiologist admits to being a coffee snob and addict. For the last 10 years I’ve been using the Chemex system to brew my morning cup of Java. Once I consistently partook of Chemex pour-over coffee made from freshly ground, recently roasted quality coffee beans it was hard for me to enjoy any other kind. I find Starbucks coffee particularly loathsome.

Although numerous studies have established that coffee consumption is safe (assuming you are not adding  titanium dioxide to your cup), the belief that it is bad for you persists in the majority of patients that I see.

Since today is National Coffee Day let me take this opportunity to reassure my patients and readers who consume the good brew that they are not harming their hearts.

While it is possible to adulterate coffee into an unhealthy concotion (see my post on “How Starbucks Is Making Heart Healthy Coffee Into a Stealth Dessert”) overall coffee is heart-healthy.

In fact a recent study (Coffee Consumption and Coronary Artery Calcium Score: Cross‐Sectional Results of ELSA‐Brasil (Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health)) showed that coffee consumption is associated with less subclinical atherosclerosis as measured by coronary artery calcification (CAC).

The intro to this paper summarizes information known about coffee and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although early observational studies suggested coffee could increase risks:

More recent meta‐analysis of prospective studies showed that moderate coffee consumption was associated with decreased CVD risk, all‐cause mortality, and mortality attributed to CVD and neurologic disease in the overall population. High coffee consumption (>5 cups/d) was neither related to CVD risk nor to risk of mortality.12, To corroborate this evidence, the 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans show that consumption of 3 to 5 cups/d of coffee is associated with reduced risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus and CVD in adults. Consequently, moderate coffee consumption can be incorporated into a healthy dietary pattern, along with other healthful behaviors. Although coffee consumption has been studied in relation to various risk factors of CVD, only 4 studies have investigated the association between coffee intake and subclinical atherosclerosis, and the data available were limited and inconsistent.

Coffee is rich in phenolic compounds which have demonstrated anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antithrombotic properties which could lower cardiovascular risks. However, unfiltered coffee is rich in cholesterol‐raising compounds (diterpenes, kahweol, and cafestol) that can  increase total cholesterol, low‐density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides.which could worsen cardiovascular risk.

Consumption of filtered coffee however does not effect lipid levels adversely- presumably those nasty diterpenes are retained by my Chemex filter.

The Brazilian Longitudinal study looked at 4426 residents of Sao Paulo, Brazil who underwent a CAC measurement.  Information on coffee consumption was obtained from a food frequency questionnairre.

Those who reported high coffee consumption (>3 cups per day) had one-third the chance of a CAC>100 than nondrinkers. More coffee=less plaque build up in the coronary arteries. Less atherosclerotic plaque should = less heart attacks and strokes.

Scientific Consensus On The Healthiness of Coffee Consumption

In contrast to what the public believes, the scientific evidence very consistently suggests that drinking coffee is associated with living longer and having less heart attacks and strokes. Multiple publications in major cardiology journals in the last few  years have confirmed this.

You can read the details here and here. The bottom line is that higher levels of coffee consumption (>1 cup per day in the US and >2 cups per day in Europe) are NOT associated with:

  • Hypertension (if you are a habitual consumer)
  • Higher total or bad cholesterol  (unless you consume unfiltered coffee like Turkish, Greek or French Press types, which allow a fair amount of the cholesterol-raising diterpenesinto the brew)
  • Increase in dangerous (atrial fibrillation/ventricular tachycardia) or benign (premature ventricular or supra-ventricular contractions) irregularities in heart rhythm

Higher levels of coffee consumption compared to no or lower levels IS associated with:

  • lower risk of Type 2 Diabetes
  • lower risk of dying, more specifically lower mortality from cardiovascular disease
  • Lower risk of stroke

So, if you like coffee and it makes you feel good, drink it without guilt, there is nothing to suggest it is hurting your cardiovascular health. It’s a real food. These tend to be good for you.

Nonpoikilothermically Yours,

-ACP

N.B. The Chemex Coffeemaker was invented in 1941 by Dr. Peter Schlumbohm PhD. Made simply from non-porous, borosilicate glass and fastened with a wood collar and tie, it brews coffee without imparting any flavors of its own. On permanent display at MOMA NY and other fine museums, it is truly a work of art.

Despite Kaldi’s gastronomic abomination I’m still predominantly using their coffee beans.

The Brailian coffee study has numerous flaws like all observational dietary studies.

The caffeine in coffee can bring on palpitations. If you feel palpitations or other symptoms after consuming coffee you should lower the caffeine content or amount until you no longer experience troubling symptoms. Be guided by how you feel.

Which Diet Works Best For Weight Loss?

In the ongoing nutritional war between adherents of low-fat and low-carb diets, the skeptical cardiologist has generally weighed in on the side of lower carbs for weight loss and cardiovascular health.

I’ve questioned the vilification of saturated fat and emphasized the dangers of added sugar  and I consider myself a keto-friendly cardiologist.

Recently I stumbled across a good review on the scientific evidence of various popular diets for weight loss. Obesity and its health consequences are clearly increasing and impacting the cardiovascular health of millions. As such, as a cardiologist it would be great to have a one true diet that is best for weight loss for my patients.

Unfortunately, as I discussed in my analysis of the DIETFITS study there isn’t a one size fits all dietary silver bullet. This recent review does a good job of analyzing the data and has some nice graphics.

Here’s the first graphic which summarizes the food groups allowed for 7 of the most popular diets

Is there any food group we can all agree on?

Yes, the non-starchy vegetables!

Dr. P’s Heart Nuts come in a close second (outlier Ornish recommends “moderation”. Extreme outlier Esselsytn who eschews all oils forbids nuts.)

Interestingly, the only one of these diets that bans red meat, chicken, seafood and eggs is the Ornish diet which is basically a vegetarian diet (see here for the lack of science behind this diet.)

Is there any food group that we all agree should be avoided? If we exclude the outlier Ornish  then there is unanimity that we should be avoiding added sugar and refined grains.

My recommended version of the Mediterranean diet says that high fat dairy is perfectly fine and actually preferred over processed skim or low fat dairy. Yogurt and cheese are encouraged.

Do Macronutrients Matter?

The second graphic nicely summarizes the macronutrient composition of these diets. The Atkins diet and ketogenic diets recommend less than 10% carbs whereas Ornish the outlier recommends less than 10% fat.

My recommended variation on the Mediterranean diet would lower the carb % to around 20% by avoiding starchy vegetables, most added sugar and most refined grains. I try to avoid ultra-processed foods completely. With this diet I am in some degree of ketosis (as measured by the fantastic Keyto device) most of the time although I’m not strictly following keto guidelines.

For example last night I had this delicious steak and smoked portabello quesadilla from Three Kings Pub. The tortilla alone contains about 40 grams of carbs, double the recommended amount for keto diets. I add elements of Three Kings Middle Eastern Sampler (Red pepper hummus, grilled eggplant relish, tzatziki, roasted head of garlic and dolmas. Served with grilled flatbread and an assortment of veggies) to get some of those universally acclaimed nonstarchy vegetables . I don’t utilize the balsamic reduction that is typically drizzled on the quesadilla because it tastes like pure sugar to me (sure enough it contains 11 grams of carbs)and I mostly avoid the grilled flatbread.

 Manipulation Of Diet Timing For Weight Loss

Breakfast is not the most important meal of the day and I only break my overnight fast when I get hungry which is typically around noon.

Variations on this type of intermittent fasting (periodic fasting or 5:2 diet, alternate-day fasting, time-restricted feeding, and religious fasting) have become popular. The review summarizes the science in this area as follows:

“There is growing evidence demonstrating the metabolic health benefits of IF. In rodents, these appear quite profound, whereas in humans they are sparse and need further investigation, especially in long-term studies. It has been suggested that IF does not produce superior weight loss in comparison with continuous calorie restriction plans [130], and there are limited data regarding other clinical outcomes such as diabetes, CVD, and cancer. IF diets seem safe and tolerable for adults…”

In other words, rats live longer with IF but we don’t know if humans do. If you find intermittent fasting helps you consume less calories through out the day and lose weight, go for it. For me fasting from 9 PM to late morning (typically 14-16 hours) give me greater energy and focus throughout the day and makes weight management simpler.

Conclusions: What Is The Best Diet For Weight Loss?

Both low carb and low fat fanatics will be disappointed in the conclusions of the review but I think it is reasonable:

There is no one most effective diet to promote weight loss. In the short term, high-protein, low-carbohydrate diets and intermittent fasting are suggested to promote greater weight loss and could be adopted as a jumpstart. However, owing to adverse effects, caution is required. In the long term, current evidence indicates that different diets promoted similar weight loss and adherence to diets will predict their success. Finally, it is fundamental to adopt a diet that creates a negative energy balance and focuses on good food quality to promote health.

I would

And here is the summary graphic

Dietetically Yours,

-ACP

N.B. With regard to the starchy vegetables, check out my “Potato Theory of Obesity.”

Source for images: Scientific evidence of diets for weight loss: Different macronutrient composition, intermittent fasting, and popular diets – ScienceDirect

And finally  (from  the  DietDoctor.com website) a graphic that illustrates the amount of healthy (nonstarchy!) vegetables that you would need to consume to reach 20 grams of carbs.

I Am A Keto-Friendly Cardiologist And I Love Keyto

The skeptical cardiologist has become more selective with regard to who he will accept as a new patient.  In practical terms this means I now call patients who want to see me and discuss with them why they want to see me, how they were referred or heard about me, and what their expectations are.

This might seem a little odd but turns out to be an excellent way for me to meet and smooth entrance for these newbies into my practice and gather important records and recordings prior to the first visit.

Recently, when I asked one of these potential patients why they had sought me as their cardiologist, the wife told me that through her internet research she had gleaned that I was a “Keto-friendly Cardiologist.”

Given that I have challenged conventional dogma on the dangers of dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and have written about ketosis (see here and here) a few times on this blog and defended Dr. Atkins I do actually consider myself “keto-friendly”.   However my prospective patient’s wife was not aware of the skeptical cardiologist as a blog writer.

How or why I was identified as Keto-friendly cardiologist was not clear.

I realized I needed to make it perfectly clear. It is now time to come out of the keto closet.

I am a “Keto-friendly cardiologist”!

I have dozens of patients who have been very successful using very low carb/high fat diets to help them lose weight and gain control of their diabetes and hypertension.

I don’t poo poo low carb high fat diets and I think they are vey compatible with a heart-healthy existence.

(I also advocate my version of a “plant-based diet“.)

In fact, lately I’ve gone back to dabbling with a Keto Diet myself.

To aid me in the dabbling I have found a device called Keyto to be the key to success and understanding of my ketosis.

Keyto: Breath Sensor for Ketosis and Weight Loss

When I went back to dabbling with ketosis in early 2019 I was using the Keto-Mojo finger prick device to measure my blood levels of beta hydroxybutyrate. I liked the precision this offered  compared to urine dip sticks but grew to dislike the need to prick my finger and create blood loss.

About a month ago I ordered I discovered the keto breath sensor KEYTO and have found since then that  it wonderfully simplifies  the process of being on a keto diet.

Keyto costs $99 and comes in a box the size of a video cassette  case.

In the box is the sensor device, four blowing mouthpieces, a very simple user manual, a AAA battery and a cute little bag for carrying the device

Ethan Weiss, MD, a highly respected preventative cardiologist and founder of Keyto includes a welcoming message for users which summarizes the mission of Keyto:

We designed the Keyto program to help you over-achieve your weight loss and health goals. With the Keyto Breath Sensor in this box, and the Keyto App on your phone, you have the key to unlocking success. You’ll be eating delicious foods, losing weight, and many  users even report an increase in energy and focus

Using Keyto Is Simple and Convenient

Getting started with Keyto is very easy: download the Keyto smartphone app, log in and follow the straightforward directions for pairing the breath sensor with the app.

Once paired via Bluetooth making measurements is easy. It’s important to understand the breathing technique needed and to facilitate this I strongly recommend watching the brief explanatory video Weiss has provided. Basically, you want to use a normal breath and blow for 10 seconds so that you are near the end of expiration when the device makes its recording.

To initiate a measurement you push the plus sign on the main “Journey” screen in the app then push the on button on the sensor.

Usually, if the sensor has been turned on and the app is activated the app immediately connects to the sensor, occasionally I have had to turn the sensor off and on again to initiated the connection.

At this point the sensor begins  warming up, reaching a temperature of 400 degrees Fahrenheit over a period of about 80 seconds.

The app displays the progress and offers you the option of answering some questions about how you are feeling and doing on the keto diet.

I often take my BP while this is going on. Sometimes I read the New Yorker. Frequently I listen to Radiohead (Climbing Up The Walls). It takes a while. Pay attention, though. You don’t want to miss your blowing window and have to repeat the process.

 

The app will give you a warning about 10 seconds prior to the time you need to blow. The graph to the right appears when it is time to blow and you can view the sensors output as it tracks the acetone it is seeing over the 10 seconds that you blow.

At the end of the blow you wait a few seconds, eagerly awaiting your score. Will you be in Ketosis?

 

Finally, your score is revealed. In this case I was congratulated for being in light ketosis with a fat burn of “medium high.” The highest score is an 8.

You can add notes to the record of your score

If you blow a 6 the app tells you that your fat burn is high and that you are in ketosis: “metabolizing fat like a champion.”

Accuracy of Keyto

When I first began using Keyto I checked the Keyto numbers versus the beta hydroxybutyrate (BOHB)  numbers I was simultaneously getting from my Keto-Mojo meter.

I found a Keyto 3 corresponded to 0.8 BOHB, a Keyto 4 to 0.9 BOHB, and a 5 to 1.0 BOHB.  That was enough to convince me that the device was accurate and useful in measuring my level of ketosis.

Given that it is so convenient compared to a finger stick I have stopped using the Keto-Mojo completely.

My observations confirm what Weiss and Ray Wu, MD, the cofounders of Keyto describe in very lucid prose here.

In extensive user testing, Keyto is directionally consistent with the more accurate commercially available blood meter. Keyto and blood β-hydroxybutyrate trend directionally the same in the majority of cases. Both go up and down in similar magnitude at different ranges of ketosis. There are some differences which are likely due to biology – the kinetics of clearance of acetone and β-hydroxybutyrate are not identical.

Some of the differences are also likely due to how we designed the Keyto program. Our primary goal was to develop a system that would give users the information they need to know i.e. if they are in ketosis, which would ultimately help promote healthy behavior change. Therefore, we chose not to report acetone concentrations in PPM or to attempt to convert PPM to blood β-hydroxybutyrate (mmol/L). The Keyto Level system was simply more effective, motivating, and fun without adding complexity and false precision.

I can make multiple measurements throughout the day without worrying about the cost or the discomfort of a finger stick. The ability to make multiple measurements means that I am getting very rapid and frequent feed back on how my dietary and lifestyle choices are effecting my level of ketosis.

Warning! Because the device is so convenient-literally you can have it with you at all times-you may find yourself blowing into it excessively. This may irritate your friends and loved ones, especially those that aren’t on a keto diet.

Keyto is Legitimate

The Keyto website has an excellent introduction to the keto diet (keto 101) and has numerous other very helpful resources for those who seek to lose weight using the diet.

In general I get a good feeling of integrity and legitimacy from every aspect of the Keyto operation.

I have a tremendous professional respect for Ethan Weiss, the cardiologist behind Keyto. He’s very active on Twitter and is typically spot on with his comments. He’s done a podcast with Peter Attia which serves as an excellent summary of atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease. He does really good basic science research involving growth hormone.

Weiss is now doing his own podcast called Best Known Method by Keyto which I highly recommend. It is not, surprisingly, focused on the keto diet or the keyto brand but interviews thought leaders in cardiology like Ron Krauss and Lisa Rosenbaum.

If you want to read more about how the Keyto breath sensor works see here. This is a very clear and concise description of the science behind the device and it is complete with references.

Ultimately, although I consider myself a keto-friendly cardiologist, I’m most interested in the diet that helps my patients achieve  and sustain their goals of weight loss and better health. For many this is the keto diet.

And for those who find the keto diet is optimal for their health I will be advising them to acquire a Keyto breath sensor and check out the programs Keyto offers to support their health goals.

Acetonely Yours,

-ACP