Tag Archives: AliveCor Mobile ECG

Review of Kardia Band Mobile ECG for Apple Watch

The skeptical cardiologist has been evaluating the Kardia Band from AliveCor which allows one to record single lead medical grade ECGS on your Apple Watch. What follows is my initial experience with setting up the device and using it to make recordings.

After ordering my Kardia Band for Apple Watch on 11/30  from AliveCor the device appeared on my door step 2 days later on a Saturday giving me most of a Sunday to evaluate it.

What’s In The Box

Inside the box I found one small and one large black rubber wrist watch band

The larger one had had a small squarish silver metallic sensor and the smaller one had a space to insert a sensor. It turns out my wrist required the smaller band and it was very easy to pop out the sensor and pop it into the smaller band.

After replacing my current band with the Kardia band (requires pushing the button just below the band and sliding the old band out then sliding the new one in) I was ready to go.

The Eternal  fiancée did not complain about the appearance of the band so I’m taking that to mean it passes the sufficiently stylish test. She did inquire as to different colors but it appears AliveCor only has one style and one color to choose from right now.

I have had problems with rashes developing with Apple’s rubbery band and switched to a different one but thus far the Kardia band is not causing wrist irritation.

Set UP

I didn’t encounter any directions in the box or online so I clicked on the Kardia app on the watch and the following distressing message appeared.

Prior to 11/30 Kardia Band only worked in certain countries in Europe so I suspected my AliveCor app needed to be updated.

I redownloaded the Kardia app from the Apple App Store , deleted it off my Watch and reinstalled it.

I was thrilled when the app opened up and gave me the following message

However, I was a little puzzled as I was not aware that setting up Smart Rhythm was a requirement to utilize the ECG recording aspect of Kardia Band. Since I have been granted a grandfathered Premium membership by AliveCor I knew that I would have access to Smart Rhythm and went through the process of entering my name and email into the Kardia app to get this started.

Alas, when the Watch Kardia app was accessed after this I continued to get the same screen. Clicking on “need help” revealed the following message:

Bluetooth was clearly on and several attempts to restart both the watch and the iPhone app did not advance the situation.

I sent out pleas for assistance to AliveCor.

At this point the Eternal Fiancee had awoken and we went to Sardella for a delightful brunch . I had this marvelous item:

Eggs Benedict Raviolo, Mortadella, Bread Ricotta, Egg Yolk, Brown Butter Hollandaise, Potatoes 15.
 Later on that day I returned to my Kardia Band iPhone and deinstalled, reinstalled , reloaded and restarted everything.
The First Recording
At this point it worked and I was able to obtain my first recording by pushing the record ECG button and holding my thumb on the sensor for 30 seconds.
I’ve made lots of recordings since then and they are good quality and have accurately recognized that I am in normal sinus rhythm.
The Smart Rhythm component has also been working. Here is a screen shot of today’s graph.
You’l notice that the Smart Rhythm AI gave me a warning sometime in the morning (which I missed) as it felt my rhythm was abnormal. I missed making the recording but am certain that I was not in afib.
Comparison of the Kardia Band recording (on the right) versus the separate Kardia device recording (on left)  shows that they are very similar in terms of the voltage or height of the p waves, QRS complexes and T waves. 
I felt a palpitation earlier and was able to quickly activate the Kardia Watch app and make a recording which revealed a PVC.
 In summary, after some difficulty getting the app to work I am very pleased with the ease of recording, the quality of the recording and the overall performance of Kardia Band. The difficulties I encountered might reflect an early adoption issue which may already be resolved. Please give me feedback on how the device set up worked for you.
I’ll be testing this out on patients with atrial fibrillation and report on how it works in various situations in future posts.
After more experience with the Smart Rhythm monitoring system which I think could be a fantastic breakthrough in personal health monitoring I’ll give a detailed analysis of that feature.
Everwatchingly Yours,
-ACP

The Perfect Christmas Gifts for the Palpitating or Hypertensive In Your Life

As December draws ever closer to the twenty-fifth you may find yourself  behind the wheel of a large automobile puzzling over the perfect gift for your loved ones.

Fear not, for the skeptical cardiologist has a few suggestions to help you.

The Omron 10 Blood Pressure Monitor

IMG_5618
EXTRA-LARGE digits with backlight!!

If your hypertensive friend or relative already has all the standard BP paraphernalia (pill splitter, basic BP cuff), owns a smart phone and has an engineer or scientist approach to data the Omron 10 (BP786, 59.99$ at Best buy.com) just might be the perfect gift.

The skeptical cardiologist recently purchased two (that’s right two) of these in anticipation of Christmas.

Christmas arrives with multiple stressors guaranteed to hike your blood pressure.

The Omron 10 offered three features not available on my basic Walgreen’s BP cuff that I felt were possibly useful:

  1. Averaging/automating three consecutive readings. After reading about the SPRINT BP trial which showed a benefit of aiming for SBP of 120 over 140,  I thought I should try to reproduce the method used in the trial. This involved measuring BP 3 times separated by 5 minutes and averaging the results. The Omron 10 can be set to make and average three BP readings separated by a variable time period.
  2. The ability to communicate with an iPhone or Android smartphone and record and display the data in an app.
  3. Works off both batteries and plug in electrical power.

I thought my dad (a retired chemist) would like the Omron 10’s features but, alas, he informed me that if he wanted to average three BP readings he could just write down the numbers and do the math.

IMG_5670If he had an iPhone he might really like the way the Omron sends its data to the free Omron app.

The app displays BP  and heart rate readings recorded for different time intervals.

You can take a screen shot like I did here or email it and share the data with your doctor through the doctor’s patient portal!

 

The AliveCor Mobile ECG

IMG_6936 copyI’ve mentioned this really cool device a few times (here and here).

It is now listed on Amazon.com for $57 (a significant drop from when I purchased it)  and can be attached to your smartphone case. It does a really good job of recording a single lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and diagnosing normality or atrial fibrillation.

If your friend or loved one  is experiencing periodic fluttering in their chest or a sensation of the heart skipping beats or racing (the general term for which is palpitations) then this could be the perfect gift.

A number of my patients have purchased these and have made ECG recordings which I can review online.

Primarily I have been recommending them to my patients who have atrial fibrillation periodically.

You may think this is too complicated a device to master but last week I saw in my office a 94 year old lady who had had an episode of atrial fibrillation earlier in the year.  Since her last visit she had purchased an AliveCor device and was able to show me the ECG recordings she had made on her iPhone.

May your holiday season be joyous, full of loved ones and free of stressors that raise your blood pressure and cause your heart to pound and race. But if it is not, consider purchasing one of these nifty devices.

Same as it ever was

-ACP

 

 

Mysterious AliveCor Mobile ECG artifact noted at Commander’s Palace

The skeptical cardiologist was in New Orleans last  weekend. There is no breaking low carb news to report but I did make it to Commander’s Palace for lunch.

Screen Shot 2015-10-29 at 3.18.45 PMThere the eternal fiancée of the skeptical cardiologist (EFOSC)  and I enjoyed delicious food, delightful company (Dave and Barb, who I wrote about last year when they dramatically improved their longevity by tying the knot in The Big Easy) and several oddly colored $0.25  martinis.

barbalivecor
Full disclosure. This was taken during brunch at Broussard’s and is a recreation of the aliveCor recording session at Commander’s Palace. Note the jazz trio in the background who later came by our table and played the St. Louis Blues.

During a lull in the activities I pulled out my iPhone and was asked by the lovely Barb what the funny looking thing stuck on the case was. This necessitated demonstrating my Alivecor mobile ECG device and recording her electrocardiogram.

CPalivecor annotated
The red arrows point to a regular artifact occurring at 200 beats per minute. Toward the end of the recording the artifact goes away and the normal QRS complexes (blue arrows) can be seen clearly.

Strangely enough, the recording was full of an odd artifact.

There was much discussion on the source of the artifact and we repeated the recording having her use her third and fourth fingers on the electrodes instead of the second and third fingers she used the first time.  Same result.

Barb speculated that it was due to the absence of husband Dave who had left the table to use the facilities.

When Dave returned we recorded his ECG and there was no artifact whatsoever.

Screen Shot 2015-10-29 at 3.15.04 PMI repeated the recording on Barb and lo and behold it was now free of artifact.

What was the source of this mysterious ECG artifact noted after an outstanding lunch and multiple 25 cent oddly colored martinis?

High blood alcohol level?

Strange electrical devices being utilized intermittently at Commander’s Palace?

Or perhaps I was recording the actual adverse electrical signals created by the absence of Barb’s devoted spouse, something heretofore not reported.

Further studies are clearly needed to fully define and characterize these waves which I have decided to call Commander’s electromagnetic marriage disruption waves or CEMDW’s.

martinily yours

-ACP