Tag Archives: diabetes

PURE Study Further Exonerates Dairy Fat: Undeterred, The AHA Persists In Vilifying All Saturated Fat

The skeptical cardiologist had been avoiding reader pleas to comment on a paper recently published in the Lancet from the PURE study which showed that full fat dairy consumption is associated with a lower risk of mortality and cardiovascular disease. It felt like beating a dead horse since  I’ve been writing for the last 5 years that the observational evidence nearly unanimously shows that full fat dairy is associated with less abdominal fat, lower risk of diabetes and lower risk of developing vascular complications such as stroke and heart attack. However, since bad nutritional advice in this area stubbornly persists and the PURE study is so powerful and universally applicable, I felt compelled to post my observations.

What Did the PURE Study Show?

The PURE (Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology)  study enrolled 136, 00 individuals aged 35–70 years from 21 countries in five continents. Dietary intakes of dairy products ( milk, yoghurt, and cheese) were recorded.. Food intake was stratified  into whole-fat and low-fat dairy. The primary outcome was the composite of mortality or major cardiovascular events.

Consumption of 2 servings of dairy per day versus none was associated with a 16% lower risk of the primary outcome. The high dairy consumers had an overall 17% lower risk of dying. They had a 34% lower risk of stroke.

People whose only dairy consumption consisted of  whole-fat products had a significantly lower risk of the composite primary endpoint (29%).

Here’s how one of the authors of the PURE study summarized his findings (quoted in a good summary at TCTMD)

“We are suggesting that dairy consumption should not be discouraged,” lead investigator Mahshid Dehghan, PhD (McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada), told TCTMD. “In fact, it should be encouraged in low-to-middle income countries, as well as in high-income countries among individuals who do not consume dairy. We have people in North America and Europe who are scared of dairy and we would tell them that three servings per day is OK. You can eat it, and there are beneficial effects. Moderation is the message of our study.”

 

Despite these recent  findings and the total lack of any previous data that indicates substituting low or no fat dairy for full fat dairy is beneficial,  the American Heart Association (AHA)and major nutritional organizations continue to recommend skim or low fat cheese, yogurt and milk over full fat , non-processed  dairy products.

The AHA Continues Its Misguided Vilification Of All Saturated Fat

Medpage today quoted an AHA spokesman as saying in response to the PURE study:

“Currently with the evidence that we have reviewed, we still believe that you should try to limit your saturated fat including fat that this is coming from dairy products,” commented Jo Ann Carson, PhD, of UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas and a spokesperson for the American Heart Association.

“It is probably wise and beneficial to be sure you’re including dairy in that overall heart-healthy dietary pattern, but we would continue to recommend that you make lower fat selections in the dairy products,” Carson told MedPage Today regarding the study, with which she was not involved.

 

What is their rationale? A misguided focus on macronutrients. For decades these people have been preaching that saturated fat is bad and unsaturated fat is good. All saturated fat is bad. All unsaturated fat is good.

To deem even one product which contains a significant amount of saturated fat as acceptable would undermine the public’s confidence in the saturated fat dogma.

Bad Nutritional Advice From The AHA Is Not New

Of course, the AHA has been notoriously off base on its nutritional advice for decades. selling its “heart-check” seal of approval to sugar-laden cereals such as Trix, Cocoa Puffs, and Lucky Charms and promoting trans-fat laden margarine. These products could qualify as heart-healthy because they were low in cholesterol and saturated fat.

To this day, the AHA’s heart-check program continues to promote highly processed junk food as heart-healthy while raking in millions of dollars from food manufacturers.

The AHA’s heart-check program is still using low cholesterol as a criteria for heart-healthy food whereas the 2015 Dietary Guidelines concluded that dietary cholesterol intake was no longer of concern.

Why would anyone believe the AHA’s current nutritional advice is credible given the historical inaccuracy of the program?

I’ve noticed that the dairy industry has done nothing to counter the idea that Americans should be consuming skim or low fat dairy product and discussed this with a dairy farmer who only sells full fat products a few years ago.

I posted his comments on this in my blog In April, 2016 and thought I would repost that posting for newer readers below:

 

The Skim Milk Scam:Words of Wisom From a Doctor Dairy Farmer

 

Full fat dairy is associated with less abdominal fat, lower risk of diabetes and lower risk of developing vascular complications such as stroke and heart attack.
quart_whole_milk_yogurt-293x300I’ve been consuming  full fat yogurt and milk  from Trader’s Point Creamery in Zionsville, Indiana almost exclusively since visiting the farm and interviewing its owners a few years ago.

Dr. Peter(Fritz) Kunz, a plastic surgeon, and his wife Jane, began selling milk from their farm after researching methods for rotational grazing , a process which allows  the cows to be self-sustaining: the cows feed themselves by eating the grass and in turn help fertilize the fields,  . After a few years of making sure they had the right grasses and cows, the Kunz’s opened Traders Point Creamery in 2003.

Two more studies (summarized nicely on ConscienHealth, an obesity and health blog)  came out recently solidifying the extensive data supporting the health of dairy fat and challenging the nutritional dogma that all Americans should be consuming low-fat as opposed to full fat dairy.

The Dairy Industry’s Dirty Little Secret

Dr. Kunz opened my eyes to the dirty little secret of the dairy industry when i first talked to him: dairy farmers double their income by allowing milk to be split into its fat and non-fat portions therefore the industry has no motivation to promote full fat dairy over nonfat dairy.

Recently, I  presented him with a few follow-up questions to help me understand why we can’t reverse the bad nutritional advice to consume low-fat dairy.

Skeptical Cardiologist: “When we first spoke and I was beginning my investigation into dairy fat and cardiovascular disease you told me that most dairy producers are fine with the promotion of non fat or low fat dairy products because if consumers are choosing low fat or skim dairy this allows the dairy producer to profit from the skim milk production as well as the dairy fat that is separated and sold for butter, cheese or cream products.”
I  don’t have a clear idea of what the economics of this are. Do you think this, for example, doubles the profitability of a dairy?

Dr. Kunz: “Yes, clearly. Butter, sour cream, and ice cream are highly profitable products… All these processes leave a lot of skim milk to deal with, and the best opportunity to sell skim milk is to diet-conscious and heart-conscious people who believe fat is bad.”

Skeptical Cardiologist:” I’ve been baffled by public health recommendations to consume low fat dairy as the science would suggest the opposite. The only reason I can see that this persists is that the Dairy Industry Lobby , for the reason I pointed out above, actually has a vested interest from a profitability standpoint in lobbying for the low fat dairy consumption.. Do you agree that this is what is going on? ”

 
Dr. Kunz: “Yes, definitely. The obsession with low-fat as it relates to diet and cardiac health has been very cleverly marketed. Fat does NOT make you fat.

Skeptical Cardiologist: “Also, I have had trouble finding out the process of production of skim milk. I’ve come across sites claiming that the process involves injection of various chemical agents but I can’t seem to find a reliable reference source on this. Do you have any information/undestanding of this process and what the down sides might be? I would like to be able to portray skim milk as a “processed food” which, more and more, we seem to be recognizing as bad for us.”

 

Dr. Kunz: “The PMO pasteurized milk ordinance states that when you remove fat you have to replace the fat soluble vitamins A & D. Apparently the Vitamin A & D have to be stabilized with a chemical compound to keep them miscible in basically an aqueous solution. The compound apparently contains MSG!! We were shocked to find this out and it further confirmed that we did not want to do a reduced fat or skim milk product.”

Skeptical Cardiologist: ” Any thoughts on A2? Marion Nestle’, of Food Politics fame, was recently in Australia where there is a company promoting A2 milk as likely to cause GI upset. It has captured a significant share of the Aussie market.”

 

Dr. Kunz: “We have heard of this and have directed our farm to test and replace any A1 heterozygous or homozygous cows.  We believe that very few of our herd would have A1 genetics because of the advantage of using heritage breeds like Brown Swiss and Jersey instead of Holstein.  Because few people are actually tested for lactose intolerance and because of the marketing of A2, it’s imperative not to be left behind in this – whether or not it turns out to be a true and accurate cause of people’s GI upset.

Skeptical Cardiologist:” I like that your milk is nonhomogenized. Seems like the less “processing” the better for food.  I haven’t found any compelling scientific reasons to recommend it to my patients, however. Do  you have any?”

 

Dr. Kunz: The literature is fairly old on this subject, but xanthine oxidase apparently can become encapsulated in the fat globules and it can be absorbed into the vascular tree and cause vascular injury.  I will look for the articles.  Anyway, taking your milk and subjecting it to 3000-5000 psi (homogenization conditions) certainly causes damage to the delicate proteins and even the less delicate fat globules.  Also remember that dietary cholesterol is not bad but oxidized cholesterol is very bad for you. That’s why overcooking egg yolks and high pressure spray drying to make powder products can be very dangerous – like whey protein powders that may contain some fats.

Skeptical Cardiologist: I spend a fair amount of time traveling in Europe and am always amazed that their milk is ultrapasteurized and sits unrefrigerated on the shelves. any thoughts on that process versus regular pasteurization and on pasteurization in general and its effects on nutritional value of dairy.

Dr. Kunz :“Absolutely crazy bad and nutritionally empty.. don’t know why anyone would buy it. The procedure is known as aseptic pasteurization and is how Nestle makes its wonderful Nesquik. If they made a full fat version of an aseptically pasteurized product it may have more oxidized cholesterol and be more harmful than no fat!!”
So there you have it, Straight from the  doctor dairy farmer’s mouth:
Skimming the healthy dairy fat out of  milk is a highly profitable process. Somehow, without a shred of scientific support,  the dairy industry, in cahoots with misguided and close-minded nutritionists, has convinced the populace that this ultra-processed skim milk pumped full of factory-produced synthetic vitamins is healthier than the original product.
Lactosingly Yours
-ACP
The two  recent articles (mentioned in this post) supporting full fat dairy are:

Circulating Biomarkers of Dairy Fat and Risk of Incident Diabetes Mellitus Among US Men and Women in Two Large Prospective Cohorts

which concluded ‘In two prospective cohorts, higher plasma dairy fatty acid concentrations were associated with lower incident diabetes. Results were similar for erythrocyte 17:0. Our findings highlight need to better understand potential health effects of dairy fat; and dietary and metabolic determinants of these fatty acids

and from Brazilian researchers

Total and Full-Fat, but Not Low-Fat, Dairy Product Intakes are Inversely Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Adults1

Do Medical IDs Save Lives?

The skeptical cardiologist recently received a package from American Medical ID, which loudly proclaimed that “Medical IDs Save lives!” The company suggested that I “Fully Open” my display and place it in a prominent location.
I’m sure you’ve seen these types of displays in your doctor’s office:

I really don’t like promoting products in the office waiting room that haven’t been proven to be helpful, so I began wondering if medical IDs really do save lives.

American Medical is one of many for-profit medical ID jewelry makers who engrave various forms of jewelry with the medical information a patient gives them, with the hope that it will provide crucial information if the patient is unable to provide it themselves.

The first organization to provide this service was the Medic Alert Foundation, which, according to their website:

is a non-profit, charitable, and membership-based organization dedicated to the well being of others. Founded in 1956 by Dr. Marion and Chrissie Collins, the foundation’s mission is to protect and save lives by serving as the global information link between members and emergency responders during medical emergencies and other times of need. As a non-profit organization, MedicAlert Foundation is governed by a volunteer board of directors, comprised of highly respected national leaders from the healthcare profession and business.

MediAlert jewelry is supported by a 24/7 call center which claims to have access to the users medical records.

While communicating with first responders, MedicAlert will retrieve your MedicAlert health record and provide your health history – including medical conditions, medications/dosages, allergies, past surgical history. We will also provide your personal identification and emergency contact information to ensure you are quickly reunited with loved ones. If you are being transported to a facility, MedicAlert will also fax your health record so your information is available upon arrival

Medical ID Jewelry Accuracy

I am unaware of ever providing MedicAlert with medical information on any of my patients, so I assume the information that they have available is provided by the patient themselves, and may or may not be accurate and up to date.

Actually, one has to be concerned whether the patient information on any medical ID jewelry is up to date and accurate.  If it’s not accurate, it could potentially confuse care providers and lead to more errors in care.

Given the potential downsides of medical ID jewelry, is there any evidence that it saves any lives, let alone millions?

There are, of course, anecdotes. And these dramatic stories help propel sales of millions of bracelets and necklaces.

Stylish Medical ID Jewelry

Lauren’s Hope is a Missouri company which a heart-warming story of its genesis: Lauren, a teenager with type I diabetes did not want to wear her medical ID bracelet because it wasn’t stylish. A new interchangeable bracelet was created.

Named after its inspiration, Lauren’s Hope quickly became a bustling kitchen-table business. In its first year, the company saw phenomenal success, particularly after the infinitely talented Halle Berry wore her Lauren’s Hope medical ID bracelet on the Rosie O’Donnell show when discussing her own Diabetes diagnosis. Practically overnight, people who had grudgingly worn, or even refused to wear, the standard, plain metal medical ID bracelets of the past suddenly had attractive, durable, stylish options they could enjoy wearing and change to suit their mood, outfit, or activity.

Today, more than 500,000 people wear Lauren’s Hope medical IDs every day, and we’re proud to say that number just keeps growing.

The compelling argument for a Type I diabetic to wear a Medical ID bracelet is that if they become confused or unresponsive from hypoglycemia, a paramedic or bystander can immediately recognize the situation, give glucose and save a life.

The problem with this seemingly apparent benefit is that the paramedic should not assume an unresponsive person who is a diabetic is hypoglycemic; other causes should be considered and evaluated. Likewise, hypoglycemia should be considered and tested for in an unresponsive person who is not known to be a diabetic.

(Before excoriating me for the above heresy, let me state that I am not advocating that insulin-dependent diabetics rip off their Medical ID bracelets)

What does Science Tell Us?

If you do a Google search asking the question “Do Medical ID’s Save Lives?” the vast majority of search results are various links to Medical ID company websites.

I was unable to find any scholarly article which addressed the question of lives saved by medical ID jewelry, but I found one 2017 British paper which questioned the benefits after a review of the scanty literature on the topic.

The paper begins with a table listing their suggestions for potentially appropriate and inappropriate inscriptions on alert tags:

From a cardiac standpoint, the relevant conditions are 1) the one medical implant they mention-an ICD (implantable cardiovert-defibrillator)  2) prosthetic heart valves, and 3) anticoagulants.

I have to say that in my 30 years of practicing cardiology I have never advised a patient with one of these conditions to wear a Medical Alert ID.

The same considerations I mentioned for the unresponsive diabetic applies to these cardiac conditions. For example, some patients with pacemakers or ICDs should not get MRIs. If an MRI is indicated on a patient that cannot give a history, it is the responsibility of the radiologists and technicians to make sure that the patient has not had an implant that would put them at risk. Thus, a careful search of the body for signs of surgery is warranted, with a standard Xray if an implant is suspected (see here).

The British paper authors conclude:

The striking result of our literature review is that there is an implicit assumption that medical IDs work, and themselves lead to minimal harm. Our commercial review revealed that these products are readily available for purchase from several companies, with no mandatory governance or minimum standards to ensure the accuracy or appropriateness of the information provided.

With regard to MedicAlert Foundation

The UK headquarters of MedicAlert Foundation has provided support for > 300,000 members (www.medicalert.org.uk/about-us/our-history); worldwide, this number rises to millions (www.medicalert.org/about/who-we-are/history). Membership with MedicAlert Foundation includes the checking of medical content displayed on the jewellery for appropriateness by a team of registered nurses (although it is unclear in which jurisdiction these nurses should be registered). The information provided to them is reliant on patient self‐reporting with no required input from the patient’s physician or access to their medical records.

They point out that “self-declaration” of patient illnesses and allergies may worsen outcomes:

. Bojah et al. describe an ‘allergy to anaesthesia’ inpatient wristband, that demonstrates how reliance on patient self‐reporting has the potential to cause dilemmas at a time when patients may be unable to elaborate 19. In an unregulated environment, mistakes or confusion of drug intolerances with allergies could mislead. For example, in the context of antimicrobial therapy, ~ 10% of the general population in the UK claim to have a penicillin allergy; however, only < 1% truly have an adverse immunological drug reaction 20. Many patients could thus be denied the most effective treatment for their infection through a misunderstanding.

And that medical ID information is not vetted by doctors:

The current validity of information on ID bracelets is also questionable; no company requires physician input into the wording on medical alert devices, although some recommend consultation with the primary care physician or healthcare provider for advice on what information to have engraved 21. Some companies advise a non‐mandatory (and chargeable) yearly update of information 3.

What have we learned?

There is no evidence that Medical ID jewelry saves lives.

The information on Medical ID jewelry is patient determined, and may or may not be accurate or up to date.

The medical ID industry is totally unregulated. Government should institute minimum standards to ensure the accuracy or appropriateness of the information provided.

I’m interested in readers’ experience with medical IDs, good and bad, so please feel free to share your anecdotes.

Has your life been saved by a medical ID?

What information is on your medical ID?

Any adverse experiences with medical ID?

Skeptically Yours,

-ACP

N.B. In the course of this investigation I realized that my iPhone has a “medical ID” function that can be activated when the phone is locked and will display relevant medical information.

I added information with my emergency contacts, my medications and a few of my illnesses (including hyperskepticism) into the Medical ID section of the Apple Health app.

So, if you find me lying on the side of the road, look for my cell phone, push the two buttons on either side, wait a few seconds for the below screen, and perhaps you can save my life!

 

 

 

Does Pravastatin Lower Your Risk of Diabetes?: The Joys of Continuing Education From Patients

One of the amazing perquisites of being a doctor is the opportunity to talk to a wide diversity of individuals with fascinating backgrounds and interests. I’ve always had some appreciation of this during my office interactions, but with age and ripening, I have come to relish and savor these conversations.

The skeptical cardiologist learns something from virtually every patient visit.  On a recent office day, I received patient pearls on topics ranging from Viking River cruises in Germany, to the method by which Express Scripts squeezes money from Walgreens and drug manufacturers, to certain novels of T. Coraghessan Boyle not centered on the maniacal vegetarian John Harvey Kellogg.

Not uncommonly, I’ll learn something about medicine or cardiology if I listen closely to my patients and keep an open mind.

I saw a 69 year old woman (we’ll call her Donna) the other day who had advanced plaque in her coronary arteries and with whom I had  initiated a discussion on the pros and cons of taking a statin drug to lower her risk of heart attack and stroke. This was not the first time we had talked about this topic; in previous visits she had shared with me her great fear of statin side effects and her desire to modify risk by dietary modification. On this visit, she came prepared with more research she had done on statins, and told me she was concerned about an increased  risk of diabetes with statin drugs.

I gave her my standard spiel:  statins, especially more potent ones like rosuvastatin and atorvastatin, appear to increase the risk of diabetes by 10-20%, however, this is offset by the benefits of statins, especially in someone with significant atherosclerosis, in reducing heart attack and stroke.

Donna then told me that she had read that pravastatin lowers the risk of diabetes. I hadn’t heard this (or more likely this slipped out of my ever-shrinking cerebral database) previously. Ten years ago, in the era before routine use of electronic health records (EHR), I would have had to just admit my ignorance and promise to look into that claim later (something that would not consistently happen due to time constraints and forgetfulness).  However, now I enter the patient exam room with my MacBook Air, primarily to access the patient’s EHR and look at old notes, cardiac tests etc.

Increasingly I also use the Mac to quickly look up information about a topic the patient has brought to my attention – either double checking what I believe to be true or researching claims I am unfamiliar with.

Often, the topic raised is the “snake oil du jour” (for example, is turmeric a cardiovascular panacea?), but in this case and many others, it is a relevant question about the nuances of disease or my proposed treatment.

A quick search (20 seconds) pulled up a 2009 meta-analysis of randomized trials of statins and the risk of diabetes. Sure enough, one of these trials (the West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study) actually showed that patients treated with 40 mg of  pravastatin had a 30% lower risk of developing diabetes.  Four studies showed no effect of statins on risk of developing diabetes and only one, the JUPITER trial utilizing rosuvastatin (Crestor), showed a slight increase.

For some patients like Donna, a higher risk of diabetes may be a deal breaker for taking a life-saving medication. Although I can confidently tell her that the benefits outweigh the risks, if she has a specific fear of diabetes, perhaps related to a family member who had horrific complications of the disease, she could easily decline to take statins.

In Donna’s case, this new information about pravastatin, confirmed by the wonders of Google and a fast WiFi connection led to her giving statins (in the form of pravastatin) a chance.

I’ll remember this patient-triggered drop of wisdom for future discussions with patients whose  grave fear of diabetes makes them balk at taking statins.

Corasonically Yours,

-ACP

 

 

 

 

 

 

west of scotland

http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/32/10/1941.full

The Skim Milk Scam: Words of Wisdom From a Doctor Dairy Farmer

The skeptical cardiologist only consumes full fat dairy and recommends this to his patients.

Full fat dairy is associated with less abdominal fat, lower risk of diabetes and lower risk of developing vascular complications such as stroke and heart attack.
quart_whole_milk_yogurt-293x300I’ve been consuming  full fat yogurt and milk  from Trader’s Point Creamery in Zionsville, Indiana almost exclusively since visiting the farm and interviewing its owners a few years ago.

Dr. Peter(Fritz) Kunz, a plastic surgeon, and his wife Jane, began selling milk from their farm after researching methods for rotational grazing , a process which allows  the cows to be self-sustaining: the cows feed themselves by eating the grass and in turn help fertilize the fields,  . After a few years of making sure they had the right grasses and cows, the Kunz’s opened Traders Point Creamery in 2003.

Two more studies (summarized nicely on ConscienHealth, an obesity and health blog)  came out recently solidifying the extensive data supporting the health of dairy fat and challenging the nutritional dogma that all Americans should be consuming low-fat as opposed to full fat dairy.

The Dairy Industry’s Dirty Little Secret

Dr. Kunz opened my eyes to the dirty little secret of the dairy industry when i first talked to him: dairy farmers double their income by allowing milk to be split into its fat and non-fat portions therefore the industry has no motivation to promote full fat dairy over nonfat dairy.

Recently, I  presented him with a few follow-up questions to help me understand why we can’t reverse the bad nutritional advice to consume low-fat dairy.

Skeptical Cardiologist: “When we first spoke and I was beginning my investigation into dairy fat and cardiovascular disease you told me that most dairy producers are fine with the promotion of non fat or low fat dairy products because if consumers are choosing low fat or skim dairy this allows the dairy producer to profit from the skim milk production as well as the dairy fat that is separated and sold for butter, cheese or cream products.”
I  don’t have a clear idea of what the economics of this are. Do you think this, for example, doubles the profitability of a dairy?

Dr. Kunz:Yes, clearly. Butter, sour cream, and ice cream are highly profitable products… All these processes leave a lot of skim milk to deal with, and the best opportunity to sell skim milk is to diet-conscious and heart-conscious people who believe fat is bad.”

Skeptical Cardiologist:” I’ve been baffled by public health recommendations to consume low fat dairy as the science would suggest the opposite. The only reason I can see that this persists is that the Dairy Industry Lobby , for the reason I pointed out above, actually has a vested interest from a profitability standpoint in lobbying for the low fat dairy consumption.. Do you agree that this is what is going on? ”

 Dr. Kunz: “Yes, definitely. The obsession with low-fat as it relates to diet and cardiac health has been very cleverly marketed. Fat does NOT make you fat. 

Skeptical Cardiologist: “Also, I have had trouble finding out the process of production of skim milk. I’ve come across sites claiming that the process involves injection of various chemical agents but I can’t seem to find a reliable reference source on this. Do you have any information/undestanding of this process and what the down sides might be? I would like to be able to portray skim milk as a “processed food” which, more and more, we seem to be recognizing as bad for us.”

Dr. Kunz: “The PMO pasteurized milk ordinance states that when you remove fat you have to replace the fat soluble vitamins A & D. Apparently the Vitamin A & D have to be stabilized with a chemical compound to keep them miscible in basically an aqueous solution. The compound apparently contains MSG!! We were shocked to find this out and it further confirmed that we did not want to do a reduced fat or skim milk product.”

Skeptical Cardiologist: ” Any thoughts on A2? Marion Nestle’, of Food Politics fame, was recently in Australia where there is a company promoting A2 milk as likely to cause GI upset. It has captured a significant share of the Aussie market.”

Dr. Kunz: “We have heard of this and have directed our farm to test and replace any A1 heterozygous or homozygous cows.  We believe that very few of our herd would have A1 genetics because of the advantage of using heritage breeds like Brown Swiss and Jersey instead of Holstein.  Because few people are actually tested for lactose intolerance and because of the marketing of A2, it’s imperative not to be left behind in this – whether or not it turns out to be a true and accurate cause of people’s GI upset.

Skeptical Cardiologist:” I like that your milk is nonhomogenized. Seems like the less “processing” the better for food.  I haven’t found any compelling scientific reasons to recommend it to my patients, however. Do  you have any?”

Dr. Kunz: The literature is fairly old on this subject, but xanthine oxidase apparently can become encapsulated in the fat globules and it can be absorbed into the vascular tree and cause vascular injury.  I will look for the articles.  Anyway, taking your milk and subjecting it to 3000-5000 psi (homogenization conditions) certainly causes damage to the delicate proteins and even the less delicate fat globules.  Also remember that dietary cholesterol is not bad but oxidized cholesterol is very bad for you. That’s why overcooking egg yolks and high pressure spray drying to make powder products can be very dangerous – like whey protein powders that may contain some fats.

Skeptical Cardiologist: I spend a fair amount of time traveling in Europe and am always amazed that their milk is ultrapasteurized and sits unrefrigerated on the shelves. any thoughts on that process versus regular pasteurization and on pasteurization in general and its effects on nutritional value of dairy.

Dr. Kunz :“Absolutely crazy bad and nutritionally empty.. don’t know why anyone would buy it. The procedure is known as aseptic pasteurization and is how Nestle makes its wonderful Nesquik. If they made a full fat version of an aseptically pasteurized product it may have more oxidized cholesterol and be more harmful than no fat!!”
So there you have it, Straight from the  doctor dairy farmer’s mouth:
Skimming the healthy dairy fat out of  milk is a highly profitable process. Somehow, without a shred of scientific support,  the dairy industry, in cahoots with misguided and close-minded nutritionists, has convinced the populace that this ultra-processed skim milk pumped full of factory-produced synthetic vitamins is healthier than the original product.
Lactosingly Yours
-ACP
The two  recent articles supporting full fat dairy are:

Circulating Biomarkers of Dairy Fat and Risk of Incident Diabetes Mellitus Among US Men and Women in Two Large Prospective Cohorts

which concluded ‘In two prospective cohorts, higher plasma dairy fatty acid concentrations were associated with lower incident diabetes. Results were similar for erythrocyte 17:0. Our findings highlight need to better understand potential health effects of dairy fat; and dietary and metabolic determinants of these fatty acids

and from Brazilian researchers

Total and Full-Fat, but Not Low-Fat, Dairy Product Intakes are Inversely Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Adults1

 

Saturated Fat: Traditionalists versus Progressives

Why is death from coronary heart disease declining in the US at the same time that obesity and diabetes rates are climbing?

Two editorials recently published in The Lancet show the widely varying opinions on the optimal diet for controlling obesity , diabetes and coronary heart disease that experts on nutrition, diabetes and heart disease hold.

fats
Typical innocent and usual suspects rounded up in the war on fat: Cheese-data show it lower heart disease risk Full fat yogurt (Trader’s Point Creamery)-data show it is associated with lower heart disease risk Butter-Delicious. Used in moderation not a culprit.

The first paper contains what I would  consider the saturated fat “traditionalist” viewpoint. This is a modification of the misguided concept that was foisted on the American public in the 1980s and resulted in the widespread consumption of industrially produced trans-fats and high sugar junk food that was considered heart healthy.

The traditionalists have shifted from condemning all fats to vilifying only saturated and trans fats. They would like to explain at least part of the reduction in coronary heart mortality as due to lower saturated fat consumption and the accompanying lowering of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol.

The SFA traditionalists fortunately are in decline and more and more in the last five years, prominent thinkers, researchers and scientists working on the connection between diet and the heart believe saturated fats are neutral but sugar and refined carbohydrates are harmful in the diet.

Darius Mozzafarian, a highly respected cardiologist and epidemiologist, who is dean of the School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts, wrote the second editorial and is what I would term a saturated fatty acid (SFA) progressive.

He makes the following points which are extremely important to understand and which I have covered in previous posts. I’ve included his supporting references which can be accessed here.

Fat Doesn’t Make You Fat, Refined Starches And Sugar Do

"Foods rich in refined starches and sugars—not fats—seem to be the primary culprits for weight gain and, in turn, risk of type 2 diabetes. To blame dietary fats, or even all   calories, is incorrect
Although any calorie is energetically equivalent for short-term weight loss, a food's long-term obesogenicity is modified by its complex effects on satiety, glucose–insulin responses, hepatic fat synthesis, adipocyte function, brain craving, the microbiome, and even metabolic expenditure Thus, foods rich in rapidly digestible, low-fibre carbohydrates promote long-term weight gain, whereas fruits, non-starchy vegetables, nuts, yoghurt, fish, and whole grains reduce       long-term weight gain.123
Overall, increases in refined starches, sugars, and other ultraprocessed foods; advances in food industry marketing; decreasing physical activity and increasing urbanisation in developing nations; and possibly maternal–fetal influences and reduced sleep may be the main drivers of obesity and diabetes worldwide".

There Are Many Different Kinds of Saturated Fats With Markedly Different Health Effects: It Makes No Sense to Lump Them All Together 

"SFAs are heterogeneous, ranging from six to 24 carbon atoms and having dissimilar biology. For example, palmitic acid (16:0) exhibits in vitro adverse metabolic effects, whereas medium-chain (6:0–12:0), odd-chain (15:0, 17:0), and very-long-chain (20:0–24:0) SFAs might have metabolic benefits.4 This biological and metabolic diversity belies the wisdom of grouping of SFAs based on a single common chemical characteristic—the absence of double bonds. Even for any single SFA, physiological effects are complex: eg, compared with carbohydrate, 16:0 raises blood LDL cholesterol, while simultaneously raising HDL cholesterol, reducing triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and remnants, and having no appreciable effect on apolipoprotein B,  5 the most salient LDL-related characteristic. Based on triglyceride-lowering effects, 16:0 could also reduce apolipoprotein CIII, an important modifier of cardiovascular effects of LDL and HDL cholesterol. SFAs also reduce concentrations of lipoprotein(a) ,6 an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease."

The Effects of Dietary Saturated Fats Depend on Complex Interactions With The Other Ingredients in Food

"Dietary SFAs are also obtained from diverse foods, including cheese, grain-based desserts, dairy desserts, chicken, processed meats, unprocessed red meat, milk, yoghurt, butter, vegetable oils, and nuts. Each food has, in addition to SFAs, many other ingredients and characteristics that modify the health effects of that food and perhaps even its fats. Judging the long-term health effects of foods or diets based on macronutrient composition is unsound, often creating paradoxical food choices and product formulations. Endogenous metabolism of SFAs provide further caution against oversimplified inference: for example, 14:0 and 16:0 in blood and tissues, where they are most relevant, are often synthesised endogenously from dietary carbohydrate and correlate more with intake of dietary starches and sugars than with intake of meats and dairy.4"

Dietary Saturated Fat Should Not Be a Target for Health Promotion

"These complexities clarify why total dietary SFA intake has little health effect or relevance as a target. Judging a food or an individual's diet as harmful because it contains more SFAs, or beneficial because it contains less, is intrinsically flawed. A wealth of high-quality cohort data show largely neutral cardiovascular and metabolic effects of overall SFA intake.7 Among meats, those highest in processing and sodium, rather than SFAs, are most strongly linked to coronary heart disease.7Conversely, higher intake of all red meats, irrespective of SFA content, increases risk of weight gain and type 2 diabetes; the risk of the latter may be linked to the iron content of meats.28 Cheese, a leading source of SFAs, is actually linked to no difference in or reduced risk of coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes.910 Notably, based on correlations of SFA-rich food with other unhealthy lifestyle factors, residual confounding in these cohorts would lead to upward bias, causing overestimation of harms, not neutral effects or benefits. To summarise, these lines of evidence—no influence on apolipoprotein B, reductions in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and lipoprotein(a), no relation of overall intake with coronary heart disease, and no observed cardiovascular harm for most major food sources—provide powerful and consistent evidence for absence of appreciable harms of SFAs."

Dietary Saturated Fats May Raise LDL cholesterol But This Is Not Important: Overall Effects On Obesity and Atherosclerosis Are What Matters

"a common mistake made by SFA traditionalists is to consider only slices of data—for example, effects of SFAs on LDL cholesterol but not their other complex effects on lipids and lipoproteins; selected ecological trends; and expedient nutrient contrasts. Reductions in blood cholesterol concentrations in Western countries are invoked, yet without systematic quantification of whether such declines are explained by changes in dietary SFAs. For example, whereas blood total cholesterol fell similarly in the USA and France between 1980 and 2000, changes in dietary fats explain only about 20% of the decline in the US and virtually none of that which occurred in France.11Changes in dietary fats11 simply cannot explain most of the reductions in blood cholesterol in Western countries—even less so in view of the increasing prevalence of obesity. Medication use also can explain only a small part of the observed global trends in blood cholesterol and blood pressure. Whether decreases in these parameters are caused by changes in fetal nutrition, the microbiome, or other unknown pathways remains unclear, thus highlighting a crucial and greatly underappreciated area for further investigation."

Dietary Saturated Fats Are Neutral For Coronary heart Disease Risk

Finally, SFA traditionalists often compare the effects of SFAs only with those of vegetable polyunsaturated fats, one of the healthiest macronutrients. Total SFAs, carbohydrate, protein, and monounsaturated fat each seem to be relatively neutral for coronary heart disease risk, likely due to the biological heterogeneity of nutrients and foods within these macronutrient categories.7Comparisons of any of these broad macronutrient categories with healthy vegetable fats would show harm,12 so why isolate SFAs? Indeed, compared with refined carbohydrates, SFAs seem to be beneficial.7

The overall evidence suggests that total SFAs are mostly neutral for health—neither a major nutrient of concern, nor a health-promoting priority for increased intake. 

Focusing On Reducing Saturated Fats Leads To Unhealthy Dietary Choices

I’ve written about this a lot. The most baffling aspect of this is the promotion of low or non-fat dairy.

There is no evidence that low fat dairy products are  healthier than full fat dairy products.

Non-fat yogurt filled with sugar should be considered a dessert, not a healthy food.

"Continued focus on modifying intake of SFAs as a single group is misleading—for instance, US schools ban whole milk but allow sugar-sweetened skim milk; industry promotes low-fat foods filled with refined grains and sugars; and policy makers censure healthy nut-rich snacks because of SFA content.13 "

It is extremely hard to change most people’s opinions on dietary fat.

My patients have been hearing the SFA traditionalist dogma for decades and thus it has become entrenched in their minds.

When I present to them the new progressive and science-based approach to fat and saturated fat some find it so mind boggling that they become skeptical of the skeptical cardiologist!

Hopefully, in the next few years, the progressive SFA recommendations will become the norm and maybe , some day in the not too distant future, the inexplicable recommendations for low-fat or non fat dairy will disappear.

As more data accumulates we may become SFA enthusiasts!

Saturatingly Yours,

-ACP

For another viewpoint (?from an SFA enthusiast) and  a detailed description of both editorials see Axel Sigurdsson’s excellent post here.

Fructose and the Ubiquity of Added Sugar

Since realizing that sugar, and not fat, was the major problem in the modern Western diet, The Skeptical Cardiologist has been ratcheting down how much sugar he consumes to the smallest possible amount.

This has lowered what I like to call my “sugarstat,” and has made me exquisitely sensitive to the presence of added sugar in foods.

With this sensitivity comes the heightened realization that added sugar is everywhere.

The obvious sources are soft drinks and other sweetened beverages, candy, cakes, pies, cookies, donuts and fruit juices. Once you mostly eliminate such things from your diet you become aware of the “background” levels of added sugar in other foods.

For example, when I consume what many Americans probably perceive as a “healthy” granola bar (from even the most natural or organic of manufacturers), all I can taste is a sickly sugar taste overwhelming all the other ingredients.

Low-fat yogurt (which I have compared unfavorably to a Snickers Bar here) tastes like pure sugar mixed with odd chemicals and a vague dairy flavor.

Seemingly healthy sushi tastes too sweet to me as it turns out to have lots of sugar mixed in  the rice and the popular eel sauce is mostly made up of sugar.

Most annoying  is the current trend for restaurants to put a “balsamic glaze” loaded with sugar on perfectly good vegetables like brussel sprouts, ruining them for me.

Fructose and Processed Foods

A review article in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings (1) this month presents the case for fructose (from glucose and high-fructose corn syrup) being the major cause of our obesity and diabetes epidemics and thus, the major contributor to cardiovascular disease in the US.

Fructose is a monosaccharide that combines with the monosaccharide glucose to form sucrose, which is what most people recognize as sugar.

Processed foods commonly contain a lot of added fructose-containing sugar but also, increasingly they contain high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) which contains up to 65% fructose.

Large intake of fructose goes hand in hand with consumption of processed foods. Approximately 75% of all foods and beverages in the US contain added sugars. Consumption of added sugar by Americans increased from 4 lbs per person per year to 120 lbs per person per year between 1776 and 1994.

Thanks to a dramatic increase in sugar-sweetened beverages, American teenagers consume about 72 grams of fructose daily.

There are a substantial amount of observational, short-term basic science, and clinical trial data suggesting that all this added sugar, especially fructose, are posing a serious public health problem.

The article presents these data in detail and I’ll summarize the major points as follows:

  1. Fructose is the likely component of sucrose and HFCS that promotes insulin resistance.
  2. In animals and humans, replacement of starch (chains of glucose) with sucrose or fructose causes increase glucose and insulin levels and reduced insulin sensitivity.
  3. Fructose stimulates epigenetic changes and metabolic alterations that shunt calories into storage depots in abdominal fat cells.

In simpler language, fructose promotes abdominal fat build-up and makes you more likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

Fruits and Fructose

I’m sure many of you are thinking, “but fructose is the major sugar in fruit, should I stop eating fruit?”

The answer is NO! The fructose in fruit is not highly concentrated. Fructose makes up 1% of the weight of a pear for example. It is combined with all of the good things, including fiber and phytonutrients and vitamins, that make fruit good for you.

Eliminating added fructose (sugar and HFCS) is by far the simplest thing you can do diet wise to improve your health. If you avoid added fructose, you will be cutting out a lot of the processed foods and sugar-sweetened beverages which have no nutritional value but contribute to obesity and diabetes.

Fructose as Toxin

preserves
Real fruit (right) and “Just Fruit Spread” (left). Note the attempts to make the spread appear healthy by announcing that it is “non-GMO”, glutan-free, “organic” and “perfectly sweetened with fair trade cane sugar”. Cane juice is added sugar .

Robert Lustig, a pediatric endocrinologist has talked and written extensively about fructose as a “toxin.” You can watch him here. He’s also published a lot of books on the topic including one which identifies the 56 names under which sugar masquerades.

It’s probably not worth buying that book, but keep in mind that agave and evaporated cane juice are just different forms of sugar. Makers of organic and “natural” foods are   as guilty as food industry giants at adding sugar, but they try to pretend that “natural” sources of sugar are somehow better for you.

I don’t think the science on fructose is totally settled, however, and another recent review (from scientists not funded by the food industry) concluded:

“current evidence on the metabolic effects of fructose, as consumed by the majority of populations, is insufficient to demonstrate such a role in metabolic diseases and the global obesity epidemic”

Skeptically Yours,

Anthony C. Pearson, MD, FACC

1. Added Fructose: A Principal Driver of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Its Consequences. Mayo Clin Proc. 2015:90(3);372-381. DiNicolantonio, JJ, O’Keefe, JH and Lucan SC