Tag Archives: EKG

AfibAlert Versus AliveCor/Kardia: Which Mobile ECG Device Is Best At Accurately Identifying Atrial Fibrillation?

The skeptical cardiologist has been testing the comparative accuracy of two hand-held mobile ECG devices in his office over the last month. I’ve written extensively about my experience with the AliveCor/Kardia (ACK) device here and here. Most recently I described my experience with the Afib Alert (AA) device here.

Over several days I had my office patients utilize both devices to record their cardiac rhythm and I compared the device diagnosis to the patient’s true cardiac rhythm.

Normal/Normal

In 14 patients both devices correctly identified normal sinus rhythm. AFA does this by displaying a green check mark , ACK by displaying the actual recording on a smartphone screen along with the word Normal.

The AFA ECG can subsequently uploaded via USB connection to a PC and reviewed in PDF format. The ACK PDF can be viewed instantaneously and saved or emailed as PDF.

 

Normal by AFA/Unreadable or Unclassified by AliveCor

In 5 patients in normal rhythm (NSR) , AFA correctly identified the rhythm but ACK was either unreadable (3) or unclassified (2). In the not infrequent case of a poor ACK tracing I will spend extra time adjusting the patient’s hand position on the electrodes or stabilizing the hands. With AFA this is rarely necessary.

In this 70 year old man the AFA device recording was very good and the device immediately identified the rhythm as normal.

Chaput AFA SR

ACK recording was good quality but its algorithm could not classify the rhythm.

GC Unclassified

A 68 year old man who had had bypass surgery and aortic valve replacement had a very good quality AFA recording with correct classification as NSRChaput AFA SR

AliveCor/Kardia recordings on the same patient despite considerable and prolonged efforts to improve the recording were poor and were classified as “unreadable”

Scott AC unreadable
Alivecor tracing shows wildly varying baseline with poor definition of p wave

 

False Positives

There were 3 cases were AFA diagnosed atrial fibrillation (AF) and the rhythm was not AF. These are considered false positives and can lead to unncessary concern when the device is being used by patients at home. In 2 of these ACK was unreadable or unclassified and in one ACK also diagnosed AF.

A 90 year old woman with right bundle branch block (RBBBin NSR was classified by AFA as being in AF.

VA AFA read as AF
Slight irregularity of rhythm combined with a wider than normal QRS from right bundle branch block and poor recording of p waves likely caused AFA to call this afib
VA unclassified RBBB
AliveCor tracing calls this unclassified. The algorithm does not attempt to classify patients like this with widened QRS complexes due to bundle branch block.

The ACK algorithm is clearly more conservative than AA. The ACK manual states:

If you have been diagnosed with a condition that affects the shape of your EKG (e.g., intraventricular conduction delay, left or right bundle branch block,Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome, etc.), experience a large number of premature ventricular or atrial contractions (PVC and PAC), are experiencing an arrhythmia, or took a poor quality recording it is unlikely that you will be notified that your EKG is normal.

 

One man’s rhythm confounded both AFA and AC. This gentleman has had atrial flutter in the past and records at home his rhythm daily using his own AliveCor device which he uses in conjunction with an iPad.IMG_8399.jpg

During our office visits we review the recordings he has made. He was quite bothered by the fact that he had several that were identified by Alivecor as AF but in fact were normal.

Screen Shot 2017-05-06 at 11.48.47 AM
These are recordings Lawrence made at home that i can pull up on my computer. He makes a daily recording which he repeats if he is diagnosed with atrial fibrillation. In the two cases above of AF a repeat measurement was read as normal. Of the two cases which were unclassified , one was normal with APCs and the other was actually atrial flutter

A recording he made on May 2nd at 845 pm was read as unclassified but with a heart rate of 149 BPM. The rhythm is actually atrial flutter with 2:1 block.

Screen Shot 2017-05-06 at 11.47.37 AM

Sure enough, when I recorded his rhythm with ACK although NSR (with APCS) it was read as unclassified

Screen Shot 2017-05-06 at 11.49.49 AM

AFA classified Lawrence’s rhythm as AF when it was in fact normal sinus with APCs.

AFA Mcgill AF

 

 

One patient a 50 year old woman who has a chronic sinus tachycardia and typically has a heart rate in the 130s, both devices failed.

We could have anticipated that AC would make her unclassified due to a HR over 100 worse than unclassified the tracing obtained on her by AC (on the right)was terrible and unreadable until the last few seconds. On the other hand the AFA tracing was rock solid throughout and clearly shows p waves and a regular tachycardia. For unclear reasons, however the AFA device diagnosed this as AF.

 

 

Accuracy in Patients In Atrial Fibrillation

In 2/4 patients with AF, both devices correctly classified the rhythm..

In one patient AFA correctly diagnosed AF whereas ACK called it unclassified.

This patient was in afib with HR over 100. AFA correctly identified it whereas ACK called in unclassified. The AC was noisy in the beginning but towards the end one can clearly diagnose AFScreen Shot 2017-05-06 at 8.39.06 AMScreen Shot 2017-05-06 at 8.11.53 AM

In one 90 year old man AFA could not make the diagnosis (yellow)

Screen Shot 2017-05-06 at 11.35.40 AM

ACK correctly identified the rhythm as AF

Screen Shot 2017-05-06 at 11.37.51 AM

One patient who I had recently cardioverted from AF was the only false positive ACK. AliveCor tracing is poor quality and was called AF whereas AFA correctly identified NSR>

Screen Shot 2017-05-06 at 8.42.46 AMScreen Shot 2017-05-06 at 8.42.26 AM

 

 

Overall Accuracy

The sensitivity of both devices for detecting atrial fibrillation was 75%.

The specificity of AFA was 86% and that of ACK was 88%.

ACK was unreadable or unclassified 5/26 times or 19% of the time.

 

The sensitivity and specificity I’m reporting is less than reported in other studies but I think it represents more real world experience with these types of devices.

Summary

In a head to head comparison of AFA and ACK mobile ECG devices I found

-Recordings using AfibAlert are usually superior in quality to AliveCor tracings with a minimum of need for adjustment of hand position and instruction.

-This superiority of ease of use and quality mean almost all AfibAlert tracings are interpreted whereas 19% of AliveCor tracings are either unclassified or unreadable.

-Sensitivity is similar. Both devices are highly likely to properly detect and identify atrial fibrillation when it occurs.

-AliveCor specificity is superior to AfibAlert. This means less cases that are not AF will be classified as AF by AliveCor compared to AfibAlert. This is due to a more conservative algorithm in AliveCor which rejects wide QRS complexes, frequent extra-systoles.

Both companies are actively tweaking their algorithms and software to improve real world accuracy and improve user experience but what I report reflects what a patient at home or a physician in office can reasonably expect from these devices right now.

-ACP

What Is The Cause of Low Voltage (Unreadable or Unclassified) AliveCor/Kardia Mobile ECG Recordings?

The skeptical cardiologist has had several of his readers submit stories and tracings of AliveCor Mobile ECG recordings which yield unclassified or unreadable recordings. In some cases this is due to excess noise but a lot of these tracings suffer from low voltage: the height of the tracing is very small.

John, a skepcard reader, is typical.

Recently, he noted his heart was racing and made an AliveCor recording which came back interpreted by the app as normal

EKG-3
First tracing. Note the QRS complex (the large regular spikes) are 2 boxes high. Right in front of them is a little bump, the p wave indicating normal sinus rhythm

 

Three hours later he made a second recording which has drastically lower voltage: the only deflections visible are tiny QRS complexes, the p waves have disappeared. I think this is also normal sinus rhythm but because p waves can’t be seen this came back uninterpretable and if there were any irregularity AliveCor would have called it atrial fibrillation:

EKG-4
Second tracing. Note the QRS spikes now are less than half of a box tall. There are no consistent p waves visible (unless one has a good imagination). The bumps after QRS spikes are T waves.

John has a theory on the cause of some of his low voltage recordings which I shall reveal in a subsequent post after testing it.

In the meantime, if any readers have suggestions as to causes of low voltage recordings or have noted similar issues please comment below or send recordings and observations to DRP@theskepticalcardiologist.com.

Voltagophilistically Yours,

-ACP

 

 

 

 

Should You Get a Routine Annual Electrocardiogram (ECG)?

Recently, the skeptical cardiologist  was asked by his  old friend and life coach (OFALCSC) whether he was correct to refuse the annual electrocardiogram (ECG) which his primary care doctor had recommended during an annual physical.

ECG showing atrial fibrillation
ECG showing atrial fibrillation

Most of my patients feel that the ECG has the ability to tell me  quite a bit about their heart. The technique utilizes electrodes on the arms, legs and chest region which  record with precision, the depolarization and repolarization of the upper chambers (atria) and lower chamber (ventricles) of the heart.

The ECG is THE tool for assessing the rhythm of the heart.  If performed and interpreted properly (not always a given) it tells us very precisely whether we are in normal (sinus) rhythm, wherein the atria contract synchronously before the ventricles contract, or in an abnormal rhythm. It is also very good at telling us whether you are having a heart attack.

If you are, however, like the OFALSC, and feel fine (meaning without symptoms or asymptomatic), exercise regularly, have never had heart problems,  and have a pulse between 60 and 90, the value of the routine annual ECG is very questionable. In fact, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPFTF)

“recommends against screening with resting or exercise electrocardiography (ECG) for the prediction of coronary heart disease (CHD) events in asymptomatic adults at low risk for CHD events”

(for asymptomatic adults at intermediate or high risk for CHD they deem the evidence insufficient). The USPSTF feels that that the evidence only supports an annual BP screen along with measurement of weight and a PAP smear.

To many, this seems counter-intuitive: how can a totally benign test that has the potential to detect early heart disease or abnormal rhythms not be beneficial?

There is a growing movement calling for restraint and careful analysis of the value of all testing that is done in medicine. Screening tests, in particular are coming under scrutiny.
Even the annual mammogram, considered by most to be an essential tool in the fight against breast cancer, is now being questioned.

My former cardiology partner, Dr. John Mandrola, who writes the excellent blog at http://www.drjohnm.org, has started an excellent discussion of a recent paper that shows no reduction of mortality with the annual mammogram. He looks at the topic in the context of patient/doctor perception that “doing something” is always better than doing nothing, and the problem of “over-testing.”

In my field of cardiology there is much testing done. It ranges from the (seemingly) benign and (relatively) inexpensive electrocardiogram to the invasive and potentially deadly cardiac catheterization. For the most part, if patients don’t have to pay too much, they won’t question the indication for the tests we cardiologists order. After all, they want to do as much as possible to prevent themselves  from dropping dead from a heart attack and they reason that the more testing that is done, the better, in that regard.

The Problem of False Positives and False Negatives

But all testing has the potential for negative consequences because of the problem of false positives and negatives. To give just one example: ECGs in people with totally normal hearts are regularly interpreted as showing a prior heart attack. This is a false positive. The test is positive (abnormal) but the person does not have the disease. At this point, more testing is likely to be ordered; specifically, a stress test. Stress tests in low risk, asymptomatic individuals often result in false positive results. After a false positive stress test, it is highly likely that a catheterization will be ordered. This test carries potential risks of kidney failure, heart attack, stroke and death. It is bad enough that the cascade of testing initiated by an abnormal, false positive,  screening test results in unnecessary radiation, expense and bother but  in some cases it end up killing patients rather than saving lives.

On the other end of the spectrum is the false negative ECG. Most of my patients believe that if their ECG is normal then their heart is OK. Unfortunately the ECG is very insensitive to cardiac problems that are not related to the rhythm of the heart or an acute heart attack.

Patients who have 90% blockage of all 3 of their major coronary arteries and are at high risk for heart attack often have a totally normal ECG. This is a false negative. The patient has the disease (coronary artery disease), but the test is normal. In this situation the patient may be falsely reassured that everything is fine with their heart. The next day when they start experiencing chest pain from an acute heart attack, they may dismiss it as heart burn instead of going to the ER.

More and more, screening tests like the ECG and the mammogram  are rightfully being questioned by patients and payers. For a more extensive discussion about which tests in medicine are appropriate check out the American Board of Internal Medicine’s http://www.choosingwisely.org.

Keep in mind: not uncommonly,  doing more testing can result in worse outcomes than doing less.