Tag Archives: KardiaMobile 6L

AliveCor’s KardiaBand Will No Longer Be Sold And Smart Rhythm Is No More

The skeptical cardiologist was quite enthusiastic about AliveCor’s Kardia Band for Apple Watch upon its release late in 2017.

I was able to easily make high fidelity, medical grade ECG recordings with it and its AI  algorithm was highly accurate at identifying atrial fibrillation  (see here). This accuracy was subsequently confirmed by research.

Many skepcard readers spent $200 dollars for the Kardia Band and had found it to be very helpful in the management of their atrial fibrillation.

However, in December of 2018 Apple added ECG recording to its Apple Watch 4, essentially building into the AW4  the features that Kardia Band had offered as an add on to earlier Apple Watch versions.

In my evaluation of the Apple Watch I found it to be “an amazingly easy, convenient and straightforward method for recording a single channel ECG” but its algorithm in comparison to AliveCor’s yielded more uncertain diagnoses.

Given it size, prominence and vast resources, Apple’s very publicized move into this area seemed likely to threaten the viability of AliveCor’s Kardia Band.

But then-interim CEO (and current COO)  Ira Bahr later told MobiHealthNews that his company’s broader business wasn’t threatened by its new direct competitor.

“We’re not convinced that Apple’s excellent, engaging product is a competitor yet,” he said in February. “We believe that from a price perspective, this product is least accessible to the people who need it most. If you’re not an Apple user, you’ve got to buy an Apple Watch, you’ve got to buy an iPhone to make the system work. So their technology is excellent, but we think the platform is both complicated and expensive and certainly not, from a marketing perspective, targeting the patient populations we target.”

Indeed, AliveCor’s Mobile ECG device and its recently released 6 lead ECG are doing very well but the threat to the viability of KardiaBand was real and MobiHealth News announced Aug. 19 that AliveCor had officially ended sales of the Kardia Band.

An AliveCor representative told MobiHealthNews that the company “plans to continue supporting KardiaBand indefinitely” for those who have already purchased the device. The company’s decision was first highlighted by former MobiHealthNews Editor Brian Dolan in an Exits and Outcomes report.

Mr. Bahr has confirmed to me that AliveCor does plan to continue supporting KardiaBand indefinitely. This includes replacement of KardiaBand parts.

Did Apple Kill Smart Rhythm?

The informed reader who notified me of AliveCor’s decision also notes:

The official reason is that they could not keep up with the Apple Watch updates and therefore the Smart Rhythm feature did not work properly.

I think many of us knew from the beginning that smart rhythm was not very accurate But in spite of that the Kardia band provided a valuable convenience over their other products.

It does appear that Smart Rhythm is no more.

AliveCor’s website was updated 6 days ago to state that Smart Rhythm was discontinued:

” due to changes beyond our control in the Apple Watch operating system, which caused SmartRhythm to perform below our quality standards”

Likely, as my reader was told, the frequent  AW4 updates plus the lack of a large KardiaBand user base made it unprofitable for AliveCor to continue to support Smart Rhythm.

Smart Rhythm, of course was AliveCor’s method for watch-based detection of atrial fibrillation. It clearly had limitations, including false positives but given AliveCor’s track record of dedication to high quality and accuracy I assumed it would improve over time..

Apple, on December 6, 2018  with the release of its watchOS 5.1.2 for AW4 announced its own version of Smart Rhythm at the same time it activated the ECG capability of AW4.

Apple called this feature “the irregular rhythm notification feature” and cited support for its accuracy from the widely ballyhooed Apple Heart Study (which I critiqued here.)

The irregular rhythm notification feature (TIRNF)was recently studied in the Apple Heart Study. With over 400,000 participants, the Apple Heart Study was the largest screening study on atrial fibrillation ever conducted, also making it one of the largest cardiovascular trials to date. A subset of the data from the Apple Heart Study was submitted to the FDA to support clearance of the irregular rhythm notification feature. In that sub-study, of the participants that received an irregular rhythm notification on their Apple Watch while simultaneously wearing an ECG patch, 80 percent showed AFib on the ECG patch and 98 percent showed AFib or other clinically relevant arrhythmias.

Despite widely publicized reports of lives being saved by TIRNF we still don’t know whether its benefits outweigh its harms. It is not clear what its sensitivity is for detecting atrial fibrillation and I have reported one patient who was in atrial fibrillation for 3 hours without her AW4 alerting her to its presence.

For AW4 users, absence of an alert should not provide reassurance that your rhythm is normal.

Thus is does appear that the Goliath Apple hath smote the David AliveCor in the watch-based afib battle. This does not bode well for consumers and patients as I think as competition in this area would make for better products and more accountability.

Philorhythmically Yours,

-ACP

N.B.

Per AliveCor the KardiaBand currently works with all all Apple Watches except the original one.

The Apple TIRNF per Apple:

is available for Apple Watch Series 1 and later and requires iPhone 5s or later on iOS 12.1.1 in the US, Puerto Rico, Guam and US Virgin Islands. The irregular rhythm notification feature does not detect a heart attack, blood clots, a stroke or other heart-related conditions including high blood pressure, congestive heart failure, high cholesterol or other forms of arrhythmia.

An Early Look At AliveCor’s Amazing KardiaMobile 6L: Accurate 6 Lead ECG On Your Smartphone

The skeptical cardiologist has been evaluating a demo version of AliveCor’s new KardiaMobile 6L.

I have been a huge advocate of Kardia’s single lead ECG and use it with great success in dozens of my afib patients. I’ve written about how this personal ECG monitoring empowers patients and providers and is a crucial component of the enlightened medical management of afib.

In less than a month AliveCor plans to release its KardiaMobile 6L which will provide 6 ECG leads  using a smartphone based mobile ECG system that is similar to the Kardia single lead system.

AliveCor’s website proclaims “This is your heart x 6.”

 

 

 

I was fortunate enough to obtain a demo version of the 6L and have been evaluating it.

My  first impressions are that this is a remarkable step forward in the technology of personal ECG monitoring. I’m not sure if I would call it “your heart x 6” but I feel the ability to view six high quality leads compared to one is definitely going to add to the diagnostic capabilities of the Kardia device.

Kardia 6L Setup And Hardware

The 6L is similar in design and function to the single lead device.

I’m including this cool spinning video (from the AliveCor website) which makes it appear, slick, stylish and  futuristic

Once paired to the Kardia smartphone app (available for iOS or Android smartphones for free) it communicates with the smartphone  using BLE to create ECG tracings.

Like the single lead Kardia the 6L has two sensors on top for left and right hand contact. But in addition, there is a third on the bottom which can be put on a left knee or ankle.

The combination of these sensors and contact points yield the 6 classic frontal leads of a full 12 lead ECG: leads I, II, III, aVL, aVR, and aVF. This is accomplished, AliveCor points out “without messy gels and wires.

I found that using the device was simple and strait-forward and we  were able to get high quality tracings with minimal difficulty within a minute of starting the process in all the patients we tried it on.

The  Diagnostic Power Of Six Leads

Below is a tracing on a patient with known atrial fibrillation. The  algorithm correctly diagnoses it. With 6 different views of the electrical activity of the atrium I (and the Kardia algorithm)  have a better chance of determining if p waves are present, thereby presumably  increasing the accuracy of rhythm determination

Depending on the electrical vector of the left and right atria, the best lead to visualize p waves varies from patient to patient, thus having 6 to choose from should improve our ability to differentiate sinus rhythm from afib.

In the example below, the Kardia 6L very accurately registered the left axis deviation and left anterior fascicular block that we also noted on this patient’s 12 lead ECG. This 6L capability, determining the axis of the heart in the frontal plane,  will further add to the useful information Kardia provides.

 

For a good summary of axis determination and what abnormal axes tells us see here.

The History of ECG Leads

When I began my cardiology training the 12-lead ECG was  standard but it has not always been that way. I took this timeline figure from a nice review of the history of the ECG

 

 

Einthoven’s first 3 lead EKG  in 1901 was enormous.

Old string galvanometer electrocardiograph showing the big machine with the patient rinsing his extremities in the cylindrical electrodes filled with electrolyte solution.
 It is mind-boggling to consider that we can now record  6 ECG leads with a smartphone and a device the size of a stick of gum

For the first 30 years of the ECG era cardiologists only had 3 ECG leads to provide information on cardiac pathology.  Here’s a figure from a state of the art paper in 1924 on “coronary thrombosis” (which we now term a myocardial infarction) showing changes diagnostic of an “attack” and subsequent atrial fibrillation

In the 1930s  the 6 precordial leads were developed providing more information on electrical activity in the horizontal axis of the heart. The development of the augmented leads (aVr, aVL, aVF) in 1942  filled in the gaps of the frontal plane and the combination of all of these 12 leads was sanctified by the AHA in 1954.


I’ll write a more detailed analysis of the Kardia 6L after spending more time using it in patient care.

Specifically I’ll be analyzing (and looking for published data relative to):

-the relative accuracy of the 6L versus the single lead Kardia for afib determination (which, at this point would be the major reason for current Kardia users to upgrade.)

-the utility of the 6L for determination of cardiac axis and electrical intervals in comparison to the standard 12 lead ECG,  especially in patients on anti-arrhythmic drugs

For now, this latest output from the meticulous and thoughtful folks at AliveCor has knocked my socks off!

Stockingfreely Yours,

-ACP

N.B. If one uses the single lead kardia device in the traditional manner (left hand and right hand on the sensors) one is recording ECG lead I. However, if you put your right hand on the right sensor and touch the left sensor to your left leg you are now recording ECG lead II and if to the right leg, ECG lead III.

I describe this in detail here. For certain individuals the lead II recordings are much better than lead I and reduce the prevalence of “unclassified” recordings.

My feeling is that by automatically including the leg (and leads II and III) the 6L will intrinsically provide high voltage leads for review and analysis, thereby improving the ability to accurately classify rhythm.

And (totally unrelated to the 6L discussion) one can also record precordial ECG leads by putting the device on the chest thus theoretically completing the full 12 leads of the standard ECG.


Please also note that I have no financial or consulting ties to AliveCor.  I’m just a big fan of their products.