Tag Archives: KardiaPRo

An In-depth, Objective Comparison of Mobile ECG Devices: Emay versus Kardia

The skeptical cardiologist has been a huge advocate of personal mobile ECG monitoring to empower patient’s in understanding/monitoring their heart rhythm.

The deserved leaders in this field are the Apple Watch (4 and later) and Alivecor’s Kardia device which comes in single-lead and six-lead flavors.

Both Apple and AliveCor have gotten FDA approval for their mobile ECG device and have a body of published studies supporting their accuracy.

In contrast, there are a number of “copy-cat” mobile ECG devices which have been feeding on the success of Apple Watch and Kardia but do not have the bona fides the two leaders have.

I reviewed the SonoHealth ECG here and found it sorely lacking in comparison to Kardia in terms of accuracy of diagnosis and quality of recordings, the two most important aspects of a personal ECG monitor.

Dan Field, a physician  and reader of my blog, has been evaluating a device similar to the SonoHealth ECG made by Emay.

He has provided a point by point comparison of the two  devices in the chart below

Emay versus Kardia

His summary:

“The Kardia6L was clearly superior in almost every way except for price and even that was within the margin of error. ”

It should be noted that the single lead Kardia mobile ECG is actually cheaper than the Emay and retails for $99.

Let The (Mobile ECG) Buyer Beware

I ended my post reviewing SonoHealth’s ECG with a warning which applies equally to the Emay device:

The SonoHealth EKGraph is capable of making a reasonable quality single lead ECG. Presumably all the other devices utilizing the same hardware will work as well.

However, the utility of these devices for consumers and patients lies in the ability of the software algorithms to provide accurate diagnoses of the cardiac rhythm.

Apple Watch 4 and AliveCor’s Kardia mobile ECG do a very good job of sorting out atrial fibrillation from normal rhythm but the SonoHealth EKGraph does a horrible job and should not be relied on for this purpose.

The companies making and selling the EKGraph and similar devices have not done the due diligence Apple and AliveCor have done in making sure their mobile ECG devices are accurate.  As far as I can tell this is just an attempt to fool naive patients and consumers by a combination of marketing misinformation and manipulation.

I cannot recommend SonoHealth’s EKGraph or any of the other copycat mobile ECG devices. For a few dollars more consumers can have a proven, reliable mobile ECG device with a solid algorithm for rhythm diagnosis. The monthly subscription fee that AliveCor offers as an option allows permanent storage in the cloud along with the capability to connect via KardiaPro with a physician and is well worth the dollars spent.

Skeptically Yours,

-ACP

 

Which Ambulatory ECG Monitor For Which Patient?

The skeptical cardiologist still feels that KardiaPro has  eliminated  use of long term monitoring devices for most of his afib patients

However not all my afib patients are willing and able to self-monitor their atrial fibrillation using the Alivecor Mobile ECG device. For the Kardia unwilling and  many patients who don’t have afib we are still utilizing lots of long term monitors.

The ambulatory ECG monitoring world is very confusing and ever-changing but I recently came across a nice review of the area in the Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine which can be read in its entirety for free here.

This Table summarizes the various options available. I particularly like that they included relative cost. .

The traditional ambulatory ECG device is the “Holter” monitor which is named after its inventor and is relatively inexpensive and worn for 24 to 48 hours.

The variety of available devices are depicted in this nice graphic:

For the last few years we have predominantly been using the two week “patch” type devices in most of our patients who warrant a long term monitor. The Zio is the prototype for this but we are also using the BioTelemetry patch increasingly.

The more expensive mobile cardiac outpatient telemetry (MCOT) devices like the one below from BioTel look a lot like the patches now. The major difference to the patient is that the monitor has to be taken out and recharged every 5 days. In addition, as BioTel techs are reviewing the signal from the device they can notify the patient if the ECG from the patch is inadequate and have them switch to an included lanyard/electrode set-up.

The advantage of the patch monitors is that they are ultraportable, relatively unobtrusive and they monitor continuously with full disclosure.

The patch is applied to the left chest and usually stays there for two weeks (and yes, patients do get to shower during that time) at which time it is mailed back to the company for analysis.

Continuously Monitoring,

-ACP