Tag Archives: mobile ECG

Which Ambulatory ECG Monitor For Which Patient?

The skeptical cardiologist still feels that KardiaPro has  eliminated  use of long term monitoring devices for most of his afib patients

However not all my afib patients are willing and able to self-monitor their atrial fibrillation using the Alivecor Mobile ECG device. For the Kardia unwilling and  many patients who don’t have afib we are still utilizing lots of long term monitors.

The ambulatory ECG monitoring world is very confusing and ever-changing but I recently came across a nice review of the area in the Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine which can be read in its entirety for free here.

This Table summarizes the various options available. I particularly like that they included relative cost. .

The traditional ambulatory ECG device is the “Holter” monitor which is named after its inventor and is relatively inexpensive and worn for 24 to 48 hours.

The variety of available devices are depicted in this nice graphic:

For the last few years we have predominantly been using the two week “patch” type devices in most of our patients who warrant a long term monitor. The Zio is the prototype for this but we are also using the BioTelemetry patch increasingly.

The more expensive mobile cardiac outpatient telemetry (MCOT) devices like the one below from BioTel look a lot like the patches now. The major difference to the patient is that the monitor has to be taken out and recharged every 5 days. In addition, as BioTel techs are reviewing the signal from the device they can notify the patient if the ECG from the patch is inadequate and have them switch to an included lanyard/electrode set-up.

The advantage of the patch monitors is that they are ultraportable, relatively unobtrusive and they monitor continuously with full disclosure.

The patch is applied to the left chest and usually stays there for two weeks (and yes, patients do get to shower during that time) at which time it is mailed back to the company for analysis.

Continuously Monitoring,

-ACP

A Review Of SonoHealth’s EKGraph Portable ECG Monitor: Comparison To Apple Watch ECG And AliveCor’s Kardia ECG

The skeptical cardiologist keeps his eyes open for new, potentially improved ways of personal mobile ECG monitoring and when I saw the following comments on an afib forum I was intrigued:

I recently started using a SonoHealth product that I find MUCH MUCH superior to Kardia..

Really? MUCH MUCH superior? The more someone utilizes all caps
to emphasize theirs points the less I tend to believe them. But, as I am on a mission to discover the truth in all things cardiologic I went to the SonoHealth website and encountered this:

The EKGraph would indeed appear to be MUCH MUCH superior to Kardia mobile ECG if the website marketing can be believed.

Like the Kardia the EKGraph offers a personal ECG monitor obtained using the fingertips and syncing to an app on your smartphone.

The EKGraph claims to have 3 lead capability, something it emphasizes in its marketing but it is only capable of displaying one lead at a time and ,  similar to Kardia one can obtain lead II and precordial ECG leads by putting one electrode on the leg or chest.

Also similar to Kardia, the EKGraph promises “rhythm detection.” As we shall learn, however, rhythm detection by the EKGraph cannot be trusted whereas Kardia has a wealth of published data supporting its accuracy.

Unlike the Kardia, the EKGraph does have a “bright LCD screen” which displays the ECG wave pattern and heart rate along with the heart rhythm diagnosis.

I emailed SonoHealth and they were  kind enough to send me one of their ECG devices to demo. After spending some time with it I can say unequivocally that it should not be purchased or utilized by any patient who wants reliable personal mobile ECG monitoring with accurate diagnoses.

A few days later a package arrived containing the EKGraph in an Applesque box which also contiained a USB charging cable. In addition they included a carrying case and a tube of ECG gel.

 

 

Working With The SonoHealth APP

To make a recording one puts the metal strip on the left side of the device on hand, arm or leg and the other metal strip on the right side of the device on an opposing limb or the chest.

This very happy model gives you a feel for the size of the device and the method of making a Lead I recording.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is possible to made a decent single lead ECG tracing with this device and view the tracing on the associated smartphone app. However, the recordings are typically very noisy and full of artifact making it hard to discern the rhythm. The software appears to lack appropriate filtering.

The SonoHealth app is free but getting it registered was a problem. On the company website support area several readers have complained of the same problem over the last few months:

 I am having trouble registering on the phone because when I hit the red button to register, I see the email and username fields at the top of the form, but when I click on email, the info fields jump to name, and I can’t scroll up to access those two fields. I then get a notification that those two fields are required to register. Any suggestions?

There is no response to this issue posted 3 months ago from the company.

Syncing with the app via Blutooth is straightforward. Pressing the sync button transfers all new tracings to the app where they can be reviewed.

Tracings can be emailed or printed.

Rhythm Detection

The major problem with the EKGraph  is that its  ability to diagnose  rhythm  is  very limited. This device has no published data verifying the accuracy of its rhythm diagnoses whereas the Apple Watch 4 and Kardia ECG devices do.  It it is not approved by the FDA.

I used the device on my self and despite identical rhythms the EKGraph called one “tachycardia” and the other “bradycardia.”

I tried using the SonoHealth on patients in my office who were in normal sinus rhythm and received wild, seemingly random diagnoses.

Whatever algorithm the device is using to diagnose rhythm is clearly not making allowances for poor quality recordings.

This patient is in NSR but the EKGraph calls it “tachycardia, VPB bigeminy” mistaking the artifact between the normal QRS beats and ventricular ectopic beats.

Multiple Sketchy Companies Utilizing Similar Hardware

I have noted other mobile ECG device with a remarkably similar appearance to the EKGraph.  A search on Amazon yields AliveCor’s devices and  the SonoHealth Ekgraph . The Amazon comparison page shows 3 additional  EKGraph identical-appearing devices seemingly from 3 different sketchy companies all priced at $79.

A consumer asked SonoHealth about the identical external appearance of SonoHealth’s and EMAY’s devices  and the company’s response was::

As a small new company making a new design for the outside shell didn’t seem viable. A mold from scratch costs anywhere from $65,000-$85,000. So our manufacturer allowed us to use their current mold to make the EKGraph.

So even though the outside is similar the software side is totally different. We have new and improved software. There’s also our own SonoHealth app that we developed from scratch.

SonoHealth is a USA company that provides excellent customer support.

I would disagree with SonoHealth’s assessment-there is nothing to suggest their software is either new or improved or even accurate.

The app that they developed from scratch is clunky and difficult to use.

Ratings and Online Presence of SonoHealth

SonoHealth posts on its website alleged reviews of EKGraph. They are uniformly positive. It’s hard to find anything that isn’t 5/5 stars. Apparently, all the problems I found with the product are unique to me.

However, these reviews should be taken with a grain of salt. A few weeks after acquiring my SonoHealth EKGraph I received an email from the company offering a gift card if I followed their precise instructions in writing a review:

TERMS: In order to receive the $10 giftcard reward you MUST write both a Company and a Product review. We will send each reviewer the egiftcard to the email that they provided when leaving the review. (For verification purposes, the email you enter when leaving the review must match the email associated with your order.)

This manipulation of the review process is shady and calls into question the validity of any review on the company website or Amazon.

Let The (Mobile ECG) Buyer Beware

The SonoHealth EKGraph is capable of making a reasonable quality single lead ECG. Presumably all the other devices utilizing the same hardware will work as well.

However, the utility of these devices for consumers and patients lies in the ability of the software algorithms to provide accurate diagnoses of the cardiac rhythm.

Apple Watch 4 and AliveCor’s Kardia mobile ECG do a very good job of sorting out atrial fibrillation from normal rhythm but the SonoHealth EKGraph does a horrible job and should not be relied on for this purpose.

The companies making and selling the EKGraph and similar devices have not done the due diligence Apple and AliveCor have done in making sure their mobile ECG devices are accurate.  As far as I can tell this is just an attempt to fool naive patients and consumers by a combination of marketing misinformation and manipulation.

I cannot recommend SonoHealth’s EKGraph or any of the other copycat mobile ECG devices. For a few dollars more consumers can have a proven, reliable mobile ECG device with a solid algorithm for rhythm diagnosis. The monthly subscription fee that AliveCor offers as an option allows permanent storage in the cloud along with the capability to connect via KardiaPro with a physician and is well worth the dollars spent.

Skeptically Yours,

-ACP

Putting The Apple Watch 4 ECG To The Test In Atrial Fibrillation: An Informal Comparison To Kardia

My first patient this morning, a delightful tech-savvy septagenarian with persistent atrial fibrillation told me she had been monitoring her rhythm for the last few days using her Apple Watch 4’s built in ECG device.

Previously she had been using what I consider the Gold Standard for personal ECG monitoring- AliveCor’s Kardia Mobile ECG   and I monitored her recordings through our Kardia Pro connection.

I had been eagerly awaiting Apple’s roll out since I purchased the AW4 in September (see here) and between patients this morning I down-loaded and installed the required iPhone and Watch upgrades and began making AW4 recordings.

Through the day I tried the AW4 and the Kardia on patients in my office.

Apple Watch 4 ECG Is Easy and Straightforward

The AW4 ECG recording process is very easy and straightforward. Upon opening the watch app you are prompted to open the health app on your iPhone to allow connection to the Watch ECG information. After this, to initiate a recording simply open the Watch ECG app and hold your finger on the crown.

Immediately a red ECG tracing begins along with a 30 second countdown.

Helpful advice to pass the time appears below the timer:

“Try Not to move your arms.”

and

“Apple Watch never checks for heart attacks.”

When finished you will see what I and my patient (who mostly stays in sinus rhythm with the aid of flecainide) saw-a declaration of normality:

Later in the day I had a few patients with permanent  atrial fibrillation put on my watch.

This seventy-something farmer from Bowling Green, Missouri was easily able to make a very good ECG recording with minimal instruction

The AW4 nailed the diagnosis as atrial fibrillation.

We also recorded a Kardia device ECG on him and with a little more instruction the device also diagnosed atrial fibrillation

After you’ve made an AW4 recording you can view the PDF of the ECG in the Health app on your iPhone where all of your ECGs are stored. The PDF can be exported to email (to your doctor) or other apps.

ECG of the Bowling Green farmer. I am not in afib.

Apple Watch Often “Inconclusive”

The AW4 could not diagnose another patient with permanent atrial fibrillation and judged the recording “inconclusive”

The Kardia device and algorithm despite a fairly noisy tracing was able to correctly diagnose atrial fibrillation in this same patient.

I put the AW4 on Sandy, our outstanding echo tech at Winghaven who is known to have a left bundle branch block but remains in normal rhythm and obtained this inconclusive report .

Kardia, on the other hand got the diagnosis correctly:

One Bizarre Tracing by the AW4

In another patient , an 87 year old lady with a totally normal recording by the Kardia device, the AW4 yielded a bizarre tracing which resembled ventricular tachycardia:

Despite adjustments to her finger position and watch position, I could not obtain a reasonble tracing with the AW4.

The Kardia tracing is fine, no artifact whatsoever.

What can we conclude after today’s adventures with the Apple Watch ECG?

This is an amazingly easy, convenient and straightforward method for recording a single channel ECG.

I love the idea that I can record an ECG whereverI am with minimal fuss. Since I wear my AW4 almost all the time I don’t have to think about bringing a device with me (although for a while I had the Kardia attached to iPhone case that ultimately became cumbersome.)

Based on my limited sample size today, however, the AW4 has a high rate of being uncertain about diagnoses. Only 2/3 cases of permanent atrial fibrillation were identified (compared to 3/3 for the Kardia) and only 4/6 cases of sinus rhythm were identified.

If those numbers hold up with larger numbers, the AW4 is inferior to the Kardia ECG device.

I’d rather see the AW4 declare inconclusive than to declare atrial fibrillation when it’s not present but this lack of certainty detracts from its value.

What caused the bizarre artifact and inconclusive AW4 tracing in my patient is unclear. If anybody has an answer, let me know.

We definitely need more data and more studies on the overall sensitivity and specificity of the AW4 and hopefully these will be rapidly forthcoming.

For most of my patients the advantages of the AW4 (assuming they don’t already have one) will be outweighed by its much greater cost and we will continue to primarily utilize the Kardia device which will also allow me to view all of their recordings instantaneously in the cloud.

Conclusively Yours,

-ACP

Note. The original version of this post had the wrong ECG tracing for the first “inconclusive” AW4 recording of a patient with permanent atrial fibrillation. H/t to discerning reader Vignesh for pointing this out months after the initial posting.

A Review Of The QardioCore ECG Strap From A Patient’s Perspective

One of my patients has been on the cutting edge of personal cardiac monitoring devices and I asked him to share his recent experience with the QardioCore ECG strap. What he sent me is a fascinating description of how the device works (which is unique in this area) along with how it was crucial in diagnosing the cause of his recent symptoms. I’m sharing it below.


I’m a current patient of the Skeptical Cardiologist and have experienced recovery from 14 months of Atrial Fibrillation with Rapid Ventricular Response, and subsequent heart failure.   While I haven’t had symptoms of heart failure or Atrial Fibrillation in over 6 months, as a former long-distance cyclist, I had been following the progress for the FDA approval of the QardioCore device since it was announced over a year ago.   You can learn more about their device at https://www.getqardio.com/qardiocore-wearable-ecg-ekg-monitor-iphone/, but I’ve pasted text from their website here: (https://support.getqardio.com/hc/en-us/articles/115000257105-Electrocardiogram-ECG-EKG- )

“QardioCore is a clinical-quality wearable electrocardiogram recorder. An electrocardiogram – often abbreviated as ECG or EKG – is a test that measures the electrical activity of the heart. With each heart beat, an electrical impulse (or “wave”) travels through the heart. This wave causes the muscle to squeeze and pump blood from the heart.

 

An ECG gives two major kinds of information. First, by measuring time intervals on the ECG, a doctor can determine how long the electrical wave takes to pass through the heart. Finding out how long the wave takes to travel from one part of the heart to the next shows if the electrical activity is normal or slow, fast or irregular. Second, by measuring the amount of electrical activity passing through the heart muscle, a cardiologist may be able to find out if parts of the heart are too large or are overworked. During an ECG, several sensors, called electrodes, capture the electrical activity of the heart.

QardioCore is ideal for health conscious individuals or those with known or suspected heart conditions to record their everyday ECGs, physical activity, sport performance and medical symptoms and share their data with their doctors. Medical professionals can use QardioCore to quickly assess heart rate and rhythm, screen for arrhythmias, and remotely monitor and manage patients who use QardioCore.

 

QardioCore should be only used in conjunction with professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and not as a substitute, or a replacement for it. Qardio creates products and services that conform to US quality, safety and security requirements for medical products, while delivering a modern user experience. QardioCore will begin selling in the US after receiving US Food and Drug Administration clearance.”

Unfortunately, the US FDA tends to move slowly, and we can only speculate as too why, but the device is not available for purchase here.   However, I found a friend in France who purchased one for me and shipped me the device.   It is not illegal for me to use the device here, but it is not allowed to be sold here in the US.

I use an Apple I-Phone 8Plus and have used both the AliveCor KardiaBand and the KardiaMobile found here (https://store.alivecor.com), and reviewed by the esteemed Skeptical Cardiologist in other posts as well.   While I find it as a useful tool, my only dissatisfaction is that I want to passively monitor my heart during sporting activities and look for rhythm disturbances.   While I’m no expert in either sporting activities or rhythm disturbances, I’ve completed some healthy reading and living on both subjects and have a general awareness of the topic.

The QardioCore device is simple to wear, comes with three belts that can be used and cleaned, and comes with a charging cable.   Everything that the app, and the product does, seems to be accurately described on their web site, so I won’t cover off on details here.   You can read more about it at this link:   https://www.getqardio.com/qardioapp/   My only dissatisfaction with this device, and other blue tooth devices, has nothing to do with the device itself.   Apple seems to randomly disconnect from Bluetooth devices with their phones.   I don’t pretend to know the specific mechanisms for the problem, but my blue tooth devices for bicycling, music headsets, and heart monitoring have all been plagued with intermittent blue tooth connection problems.   So, at times, I find myself having to restart their app to keep the device connected, which is a minor annoyance.   

I also use the QardioArm product to measure and monitor my blood pressure and am satisfied with it as well.

What follows is my anecdotal experiences of September 26, 2018 through the present day and I agreed to write about them here, in case it provides useful insight to others in some way.

As a person with a short-term history of heart problems, I tend to capture a lot of data with my devices.   I monitor things like heart rate variability, blood pressure, Alivecor Kardia readings, sleep history, etc.   I make an active attempt to monitor my levels of stress, but I know for certain that I lead a stressful life.  I work longer hours than I should, probably sleep less than I should, exercise less than I like and should, and medicate and pray far less than I should.  So, I don’t want to imply that anything that happened is the fault of the medical system, bad blue tooth connections, bad medical care, or bad advice from the Skeptical Cardiologist or any other medical professional.   I tend to listen well, learn well, but I don’t always act as I should.  But, I’m responsible for my choices, my decisions, and I live with the results of my actions.

With that said, I was sitting at the office on Wednesday September 26th, 2018 and was working away without a care in the world.   As a computer programmer, I’m very sedentary and enjoy my work.   I was wearing my QardioCore ECG strap at the time because I’m a big believer in capturing baseline data for my general living and lifestyle.   I believe this data was invaluable in my first episode of heart problems, but have no supporting evidence to support my claim.   At around 8:58:42 AM, I felt somewhat bad, and felt my heart racing.   I glanced over at my phone which was showing the ECG trace at the time and noticed what I believed was Atrial Flutter at the time.   But, after about 20 seconds, the ECG trace returned to normal, and I felt fine again.   I made a quick note of the time, because I was busy, and continued working for the day.  The Quardio App provides no diagnostic information, so it doesn’t analyze and interpret ECG patterns like the Alivecor Kardia app does. When I arrived at home later that day, I went back to look at the ECG trace, as the Quardio App easily allows that through features of the App.   When I found the point in time of the ECG, I became concerned immediately because I believe that I was seeing a pattern that I recognized as Ventricular Tachycardia, a condition that comes in many forms, and has many causes, but can be fatal if not properly treated.   As my cortisol levels increased, I contacted Dr. Google and just quickly verified that I wasn’t completely nuts, although I acknowledge there may be some partial nuttiness there.   While going through this process, I experienced another 4 second episode which only increased my anxiety levels.   After contacting my wife and asking her to return home, and informing some family members, I felt it best that I should contact the Skeptical Cardiologist after hours for input on my problem.   I hate to bother the doctor, as he is a busy man, but contacted his after-hours number.  While the operator on the other end of the line wondered what kind of nut case I was, she kindly contacted the doctor who promptly called me on my cell phone.    I had informed the kind doctor that I had the device about three weeks prior, so he was already aware that I had the QardioCore.   I quickly informed the doctor that I believed I had experienced at least one but possibly two cardiac events.   After briefly talking, I hung up the phone and texted him photos of the screens from the Quardio App, so he could see the ECG tracings.   Here are the photos that I sent to the Skeptical Cardiologist via text:

 

 

IMG_6828

 

IMG_6829

I believe this tool is valuable in many ways, but I believe that it was helpful for the Skeptical Cardiologist, as it helped narrow our focus of blood tests, scans, and potential procedures to run in a faster than normal basis.   Normally, if I had not had evidence (accurate or not), I would have had to schedule an appointment, or go to ER.   At that point, they would have either ordered an event monitor for me to wear while I was away from the hospital, or they would have had to admit me.   Since I had a past history of Atrial Fibrillation, which isn’t quite as serious, we would have been sent home with an event monitor and instructions to take it easy and continue to take meds.   We would have run more blood work, and more scans, but the point is that we would have been more broadly focused, as we would have had to generally guess as to the nature of the event and narrow it down.

I recognize that this is one of the controversies that is active in clinical cardiology, as I listen to podcasts by Dr. John Mandrola and others regarding the latest cardio devices, procedures and research.   I realize that many Cardiologists are not in favor of devices like these, because they lead to uninformed conclusions, which leads to unneeded stress on both patients and their stressed-out doctors and cardiologists.   I’ve listened to both sides of the argument, and I have my own opinions that I won’t express here.   I will just say that I believe that this device saved me time, possibly my life (as I don’t know what I don’t know, unless I know to look), and some time in hastening and narrowing my therapy choices.

I will say that my wife and I were extremely happy with the services provided by his staff, himself, his colleagues, and the hospital staff as well.   While I am confident I may be considered a difficult patient by some, or many, they were very thorough and kind in their treatment and explanation of my treatment options.

I hope that my experience adds helpful insight to the discussion.   I’m confident that the Skeptical Cardiologist will add to this post, with his views on the events I’ve discussed above.   And, I believe he appreciates having a Skeptical Patient every now and then as well.


As The Skeptical Patient wrote,  this device is not sold in the United States. Having seen it in action now, I’m eager to get my hands on one and evaluate it further. It could dramatically alter home arrhythmia monitoring. For this patient it was incredibly helpful.  If any of my European or Australian readers has experience with it please let me know.

Qardio makes a stylish, accurate and portable home BP monitor that I’ve written favorably about here.

Qardiodynamically Yours,

-ACP

N.B. Featured image of man running on beach with QardioCore is not of my patient.

Apple’s Alternative Facts And The Giant Watch Restaurant Next Door To AliveCor

As I pointed out Friday,  Apple’s claim that the ECG sensor on their new Apple Watch 4  (available “later this year”) is  “the First ECG product offered over the counter directly to consumers” is totally bogus.

AliveCor’s Kardia mobile ECG device was approved by the FDA  for over the counter direct to consumer sales on February 10, 2014. Apple had to have known this as they worked with AliveCor to bring the first Apple Watch based ECG device to FDA approval in 2017.

I tried but failed to get AliveCor founder Dr. David Albert’s thoughts on Apple’s disinformation but Yahoo finance was able to speak to Vic Gundotra, the CEO of AliveCor:

Over at the headquarters of AliveCor, a startup based in Google’s hometown of Mountain View, they, too, were surprised by the announcement, CEO Vic Gundotra said in a phone interview on Thursday. Gundotra is a former Googler, widely known as the executive behind the Google+ social network.

Specifically, Gundotra says that his company was confused by Apple’s claims that the Series 4 will be the first over-the-counter ECG testing device for consumers. AliveCor is a 49-employee startup that makes over-the-counter ECG testing devices and software, including an FDA-cleared band for the Apple Watch, called KardiaBand, and a version that attaches to a smartphone, called Kardia.

Gundotra was also surprised by Apple’s claims of ECG primacy

“We were watching [the announcement], and we were surprised,” Gundotra said. “It was amazing, it was like us being on stage, with the thing we’ve been doing for 7 years,” referring to AliveCor’s product for detecting atrial fibrillation  (AFib), a tough-to-spot heart disorder that manifests as an irregular, often quick heart rate that can cause poor circulation.

“Although when they said they were first to go over-the-counter, we were surprised,” he continued. “Apple doesn’t like to admit they copy anyone, even in the smallest things. Their own version of alternative facts.”

One man’s alternative fact is another (less polite) man’s lie.

Gundotra apparently views Apple’s entry as a good thing

“We love that Apple is validating AFib; just wait until you see what AliveCor is going to do next,” he said. “We were a great restaurant in a remote section of town, and someone just opened a giant restaurant right next to us, bringing a lot more attention.”

And as I pointed out previously, the AliveCor mobile ECG device (not the Kardia Band) is significantly cheaper than an Apple Watch and has multiple studies showing its accuracy. Interestingly, Gundotra indicates AliveCor sales has increased after the Apple announcement,.

“Ours is $99, theirs is $399, our sales popped yesterday, big time,”

Antialternafactively Yours,

-ACP

Can AliveCor’s Mobile ECG Device Combined With Its Kardia Pro Cloud-Based Platform Replace Standard Long Term Rhythm Monitors?

In March of 2017 AliveCor introduced Kardia Pro, a cloud-based software platform that allows physicians to monitor patients who use the Kardia mobile ECG device.

I have been utilizing the Kardia mobile ECG  device since 2013 with many of my atrial fibrillation (AF)  patients and have  found it be very useful as a personal intermittent long term cardiac monitor. (see here and here)

I signed up for the Kardia Pro service about 3 months ago and all of my patients who purchased Kardia devices prior to March of 2017 have been migrated automatically to Kardia Pro by AliveCor.

Now (post March 2017),  patients who acquire a Kardia device must sign up for the Kardia Pro service at $15 per month to connect with a  physician.

I think this is money well spent and I’ll demonstrate how the service works with a few examples.

Monitoring Patients With Atrial Fibrillation

 I saw a 68 year old man with persistent atrial fibrillation that was first diagnosed at the time of pneumonia in late 2017.

He underwent a cardioversion after recovering from the pneumonia but quickly reverted back to AF. His prior cardiologist offered him the option of repeat cardioversion and long term flecainide therapy for maintenance of normal sinus rhythm (NSR) but he declined.

When I saw him for the first time in the office  a  month ago I  listened to his heart and to my surprise, noted a regular rhythm: an AliveCor recording in the office confirmed he was in NSR. The patient had been unaware of when he was in or out of rhythm

We discussed methods for monitoring his rhythm at this point which include a 24 Holter monitor, a 7 to 14 day Long Term Monitor, a Cardiac Event Monitor and a Mobile Cardiac Outpatient Telemetry device. These devices are helpful and although expensive are often covered by insurance.  They require wearing electrodes or a patch continuously and the results are not immediately available.

I also offered him the option of monitoring his AF using a Kardia device with the recordings connected to me by Kardia Pro.

He purchased the device on his own for $99, downloaded the app for his smartphone and began making recordings.

I enrolled him in my Kardia Pro account and he received an email invitation with a code that he entered which connected his account with mine, allowing me to view all of his recordings as they were made.

When I log into my Kardia Pro account I can now view a graphic display of the recordings he has made with color coding of whether they were considered normal or abnormal by Kardia.

The patient overview page also displays BP information if the patient is utilizing certain Omron devices which work with Kardia.

kardia pro wc monthly

The display shows that after our office visit he maintained NSR for 3 days (green dots) and then intermittently had ECG recordings classified as AF (yellow dots) or unclassified (black).

The more he used the device and got feedback on when he was in or out of rhythm the more he was able to recognize symptoms that were caused by AF.

I can click on any of the dots and six second strips of the full recording are displayed.  In the example below I clicked on 2/27 which has both an unclassified recording (which is atrial flutter) and an AF recording

Clicking on the ECG strips brings up  the full 30 second recording on a page that also allows me to assign my formal  interpretation. In the example below I added atrial flutter as the diagnosis, changing it from Kardia’s unclassified (Kardia’s algorithm calls anything it cannot clearly identify as AF that is over 100 BPM as unclassified.)

The ECG can then be archived or exported for entry into an EHR.

The benefits of this patient being connected
to me are obvious: we now  have an instantaneous patient-controlled method for knowing what his cardiac rhythm is doing whether he is having symptoms or not.

This knowledge allows me to make more informed treatment decisions.

The Kardia Pro Dashboard

When I  log into kardia pro I see this screen.

dashboard karia pro It contains buttons for searching for a specific patient or adding a new patient. Adding new patients is a quick and simple process requiring input of patient demographics including  email and birthdate.

From the opening screen you can click on your triage tab. I have elected to have all non normal patient recorded ECGS go into the triage tab.

Other Examples

Another patient’s Kardia Pro page shows that he records an ECG nearly every day and most of the time Kardia documents NSR in the 60s. Overall, he has made 773 recordings and 677 of them were NSR, 28 unanalyzed (due to brevity) , 13 unclassified and 55 showing AF.

Monitoring Rate  Control  In Patients With AF and Reversion Post-Cardioversion

Another patient I saw for the first time recently has had long-standing persistent AF.  His previous cardiologist performed an electrical cardioversion a year ago but the patient reverted back to AF in 40 hours.   Before seeing me he had purchased a Kardia mobile ECG device and was using it  to monitor his heart rate.

After he accepted my email invitation to connect via Kardia Pro I was able to see his rhythm and rate daily. The Kardia Pro chart belowshows his daily heart rate while in atrial fibrillation. We utilized this to guide titration of his rate controlling medications.  Such precise remote monitoring of heart rate in AF (which is often difficult to accurately assess by standard heart rate devices) obviates the need for office visits for 12 lead ECGs or periodic Holter monitors.

I performed a  second cardioversion on him after which he made  daily recordings documenting maintenance of NSR. With this system we can determine exactly when AF returns, information which will be very helpful in determining future treatment options.

Kardia Pro Plus Kardia Mobile ECG Creates Personal Intermittent Long Term Rhythm Monitor

There are many potential applications of the Kardia ECG device beyond AF monitoring (assessing palpitations, PVCs, tachycardia, etc.) but they are all enhanced when the device is combined with a good cardiologist connected to the device by Kardia Pro.

I’ve gotten spoiled by the information I get from my AF patients who are on  Kardia Pro now. When they call the office with palpitations or a sense of being out of rhythm I can determine within a minute what their rhythm is wherever I am (excluding tropical beaches and mountain tops)  or wherever the patient is (for the most part.)

On the other hand patients who are not on Kardia Pro have to come into the office for  12-lead ECGs. When they call I feel like my diagnostic tools are limited. Such patients usually end up getting one of the standard Long Term Monitoring (LTM) Devices. If I am fortunate, after a  few days to weeks , the results of the LTM will be faxed to my office.

I am optimistic based on this early experience with Kardia Pro that ultimately this service in conjunction with the Kardia Mobile ECG device (or similar products) will replace many of the more expensive and inconvenient long term monitoring devices that cardiologists currently use.

Skeptically Yours,

-ACP

Kardia’s Fascinating SmartRhythm For Apple Watch Is Very Cool: Will It Allow Personal Atrial Fibrillation Detection?

The KardiaBand for Apple Watch from AliveCor has delivered on  its  unique promise of a medical grade single lead ECG recording made by placing your thumb on your wristwatch band.

The ECG recordings are equivalent in quality to those made by their previously available KardiaMobile (see my prior post here.) After more experience with the Band I think the ease of recording is superior to KardiaMobile and the ability to discriminate atrial fibrillation from normal sinus rhythm is similar to KardiaMobile.

By combining either a KardiaBand or a KardiaMobile device with Kardia’s SmartRhythm monitoring system for Apple Watch we now have the promise of personal monitoring to detect atrial fibrillation.

What is SmartRhythm?

SmartRhythm is AliveCor’s term for its system for monitoring your heart rate and activity levels in order to identify when your rhythm is abnormal.

The system “takes your heart rate and activity data gathered from the Apple Watch and evaluates it using a deep neural network to predict your heart rate pattern.”

The heart rate is obtained from the Apple Watch PPG sensor every 5 seconds.  If it differs from what is predicted SmartRhythm notifies you to record an ECG.

If you’d like to learn more detail about the development of SmartRhythm and how it functions, AliveCor has an excellent informational piece here.

You can choose to have the Kardia SmartRhythm display come up whenever your Apple Watch awakens. It’s got information on your heart rate and activity over the preceding several hours

SmartRhythm display. The light blue vertical bars representing heart rate range during an interval. The continuous lines above and below the vertical bars show the boundaries of heart rate predicted by the neural network based on your measured activity from the Watch accelerometer. . Upper left corner is yellow triangle indicating that the system detected potential abnormal rhythm and recommended a recording. The dot on the right is an ECG recording. The vertical bars at the very bottom represent steps taken during an interval

The AliveCor FAQ on SmartRhythm stresses that a notification does not always mean an abnormal rhythm. Clearly false positives can and will occur. The first day I wore my KardiaBand I had several of these.

Causes for false positives include exercise that Apple Watch couldn’t detect, stress or anxiety-in other words, situations where your heart rate is higher than predicted by how much activity you are doing.

The long term record of your SmartRhythm recordings resides on your iPhone . Here’s my record for the last week

Note that Kardia , in addition to tracking your heart rate, also shows you by the green, yellow and orange dots, the times that ECG recordings were made.

Green dots indicate recordings classified as normal and yellow as “unclassified.” In my case most of the unclassified recordings were due to heart rate >100 BPM associated with exercise.

There is one orange dot indicating that Kardia felt the ECG showed “possible atrial fibrillation.”

This happened when I took my Apple Watch off my wrist and put it on one of my patients who has permanent atrial fibrillation. I had him push on the KardiaBand sensor to make an ECG recording and it was correctly identified as atrial fibrillation.

Thus far I have had no notifications of “possible atrial fibrillation” while I have been wearing my watch thus the false positive rate appears acceptably low.

How Does SmartRhythm Perform During Exercise?

I checked out SmartRhythm’s ability to predict normal and abnormal  heart patterns by wearing it during a session on my indoor bike trainer. The device did a good job of tracking both my heart rate and activity during the workout.  You can view the most recent data by viewing your Apple Watch screen during the workout as below

Or for more detailed information you can view the complete history on your iPhone as below

The system accurately tracked my heart rate and activity (although AliveCor lists stationary bike as an activity that may result in false positives). During a session of weights after the aerobic workout despite erratic heart rates and arm movements it did not notify me of an abnormality. I also did 100 jumping jacks (which involves wildly flailing my arms) and the heart rate remained within the predicted boundaries.

What is more remarkable is that I was able while cycling at peak activity to make a  very good quality ECG recording by taking my right hand off the handle bar and pushing my thumb down on the KardiaBand sensor on my left wrist.

This recording clearly  displays p waves and is sinus tachycardia. It’s unclassified by Kardia because the rate is >100 BPM.

Afib Patient Experience

One of my patients last week, a 70 year old woman with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, had already set up SmartRhythm monitoring on her Apple Watch.

The Apple Watch face of my patient with the Kardia icon bottom right. Note also that she has a Starbucks reward available

I have this patient like many of my afibbers utilizing KardiaMobile to check an ECG when  they think they are in afib.

However, she, like many of my afib patients, is totally unaware when her heart is out of rhythm. Such asymptomatic patients are alerted to the fact that they are in afib by detection of a rapid heart rate (from a heart rate tracking wearable or BP monitor) or an irregular heart beat (from BP monitor or by someone checking the pulse) or by a random recording of an ECG.

She’s started using SmartRhythm in the hopes that it will provide a reliable and early warning of when she goes into atrial fibrillation.

We discussed the possibility of stopping the flecainide she takes to maintain normal rhythm to test the accuracy of the SmartRhythm system for detecting atrial fibrillation in her but decided not to. She’s on an oral anticoagulant and therefore protected from stroke so development of atrial fibrillation will not be dangerous for her.

I eagerly await the first real world, real patient reports of SmartRhythm’s performance in atrial fibrillation detection.

If there are any afibbers out there who have had an episode of atrial fibrillation detected by  SmartRhythm please let me know the details.

We need such anecdotes along with controlled trials to determine how useful SmartRhythm will be as a personal wearable system for detection of afib.

Fastidiously Yours,

-ACP

N.B. I’ve copied a nice section from AliveCor’s website which describes in detail the difference between measuring heart rate from the PPG sensor that all wearable devices use versus measuring the electrical activity of the heart with an ECG.

To understand how Kardia for Apple Watch works, let’s start by talking about your heart, how the Apple Watch and other wearable devices can measure your heart rate, and how an ECG is different from the information you get from a heart rate sensor alone.

Your heart is a pump. With each beat of your heart, blood is pumped through your arteries and causes them to expand. In the time between beats, your arteries relax again. On the underside of the Apple Watch is a sensor, called a photoplethysmogram (PPG), that uses green and infrared LEDs to shine light onto your skin, and detects the small changes in the amount of light reflected back as your arteries expand and relax with each beat of your heart. Using this sensor, the Apple Watch can tell how fast your heart is beating, and how your heart rate changes over time.

But, your heart rate does not tell everything there is to know about your heart. The PPG sensor on the Apple Watch can only see what happens after each heartbeat, as blood is pumped around your body. It can’t tell you anything about what is making your heart beat, or about what happens inside your heart during each beat. An ECG is very different, and tells you a lot more!

Three hearts showing a P-Wave, QRS-Complex, and a T-Wave

An ECG measures the electrical activity in your heart muscles. It detects the small pulse of electricity from the sinoatrial node (the body’s natural pacemaker, which normally initiates each heartbeat) and the large electrical impulses produced as the lower chambers of the heart (the ventricles) contract and relax. By looking at an ECG, a doctor can discern a wealth of information about the health and activity of your heart muscle, much more than you can tell from your heart rate alone. ECGs are the required gold standard for diagnosis of arrhythmias and many cardiac abnormalities, and can even be used to see evidence of acute heart attacks and even events that have occurred in the past.

Research has shown that taking frequent ECGs increases the likelihood of detecting certain arrhythmias, and decreases the mean time to diagnosis.

Review of Kardia Band Mobile ECG for Apple Watch

The skeptical cardiologist has been evaluating the Kardia Band from AliveCor which allows one to record single lead medical grade ECGS on your Apple Watch. What follows is my initial experience with setting up the device and using it to make recordings.

After ordering my Kardia Band for Apple Watch on 11/30  from AliveCor the device appeared on my door step 2 days later on a Saturday giving me most of a Sunday to evaluate it.

What’s In The Box

Inside the box I found one small and one large black rubber wrist watch band

The larger one had had a small squarish silver metallic sensor and the smaller one had a space to insert a sensor. It turns out my wrist required the smaller band and it was very easy to pop out the sensor and pop it into the smaller band.

After replacing my current band with the Kardia band (requires pushing the button just below the band and sliding the old band out then sliding the new one in) I was ready to go.

The Eternal  fiancée did not complain about the appearance of the band so I’m taking that to mean it passes the sufficiently stylish test. She did inquire as to different colors but it appears AliveCor only has one style and one color to choose from right now.

I have had problems with rashes developing with Apple’s rubbery band and switched to a different one but thus far the Kardia band is not causing wrist irritation.

Set UP

I didn’t encounter any directions in the box or online so I clicked on the Kardia app on the watch and the following distressing message appeared.

Prior to 11/30 Kardia Band only worked in certain countries in Europe so I suspected my AliveCor app needed to be updated.

I redownloaded the Kardia app from the Apple App Store , deleted it off my Watch and reinstalled it.

I was thrilled when the app opened up and gave me the following message

However, I was a little puzzled as I was not aware that setting up Smart Rhythm was a requirement to utilize the ECG recording aspect of Kardia Band. Since I have been granted a grandfathered Premium membership by AliveCor I knew that I would have access to Smart Rhythm and went through the process of entering my name and email into the Kardia app to get this started.

Alas, when the Watch Kardia app was accessed after this I continued to get the same screen. Clicking on “need help” revealed the following message:

Bluetooth was clearly on and several attempts to restart both the watch and the iPhone app did not advance the situation.

I sent out pleas for assistance to AliveCor.

At this point the Eternal Fiancee had awoken and we went to Sardella for a delightful brunch . I had this marvelous item:

Eggs Benedict Raviolo, Mortadella, Bread Ricotta, Egg Yolk, Brown Butter Hollandaise, Potatoes 15.
 Later on that day I returned to my Kardia Band iPhone and deinstalled, reinstalled , reloaded and restarted everything.
The First Recording
At this point it worked and I was able to obtain my first recording by pushing the record ECG button and holding my thumb on the sensor for 30 seconds.
I’ve made lots of recordings since then and they are good quality and have accurately recognized that I am in normal sinus rhythm.
The Smart Rhythm component has also been working. Here is a screen shot of today’s graph.
You’l notice that the Smart Rhythm AI gave me a warning sometime in the morning (which I missed) as it felt my rhythm was abnormal. I missed making the recording but am certain that I was not in afib.
Comparison of the Kardia Band recording (on the right) versus the separate Kardia device recording (on left)  shows that they are very similar in terms of the voltage or height of the p waves, QRS complexes and T waves. 
I felt a palpitation earlier and was able to quickly activate the Kardia Watch app and make a recording which revealed a PVC.
 In summary, after some difficulty getting the app to work I am very pleased with the ease of recording, the quality of the recording and the overall performance of Kardia Band. The difficulties I encountered might reflect an early adoption issue which may already be resolved. Please give me feedback on how the device set up worked for you.
I’ll be testing this out on patients with atrial fibrillation and report on how it works in various situations in future posts.
After more experience with the Smart Rhythm monitoring system which I think could be a fantastic breakthrough in personal health monitoring I’ll give a detailed analysis of that feature.
Everwatchingly Yours,
-ACP

AliveCor’s Kardia Band Is Now Available: Mobile ECG On Your Apple Watch

AliveCor has finally gotten approval from the FDA to release its Kardia Band in the United States.

The skeptical cardiologist is quite excited to get his hands (or wrist) on one and just gave AliveCor $199 to get it.

The device incorporates a mobile ECG sensor into a wrist band that works with either 42 or 38 mm Apple watches. I’ve written extensively about AliveCor’s previous mobile ECG product (here and here) which does a good job of recording a single lead ECG rhythm strip and identifying atrial fibrillation versus normal rhythm,

Hopefully, the Kardia Band will work as well as the earlier device in accurately detecting atrial fibrillation.

According to this brief video to make a recording you tap the watch screen then put your thumb on the sensor on the band.

The app can monitor your heart rate constantly and alerts you  to make a recording if it thinks you have an abnormal rhythm.

I was alerted to the release of Kardia by Larry Husten’s excellent Cardio Brief blog and in his post he indicates that the alert service , termed Smart Rhythm,  requires a subscription of $99 per year.:

AliveCor simultaneously announced the introduction of SmartRhythm, a program for the Apple Watch that monitors the watch’s heart rate and activity sensors and provides real-time alerts to users to capture an ECG with the Kardia Band. The program, according to an AliveCor spokesperson, “leverages sophisticated artificial intelligence to detect when a user’s heart rate and physical activity are out of sync, and prompts users to take an EKG in case it’s signaling possible abnormalities like AFib.”

The Kardia Band will sell for $199. This includes the ability to record unlimited ECGs and to email the readings to anyone. The SmartRhythm program will be part of the company’s KardiaGuard membership, which costs $99 a year. KardiaGuard stores ECG recordings in the cloud and provides monthly summary reports on ECGs and other readings taken.

AliveCor tells me my Kardia Band will be shipped in 1-2 days and I hope to be able to give my evaluation of it before Christmas.

Please note that I paid for the device myself in order to avoid any bias that could be introduced by receiving largesse from AliveCor.

Proarrhythmically Yours

-ACP

N.B. Larry Husten’s article includes some perspective and warnings from two cardiologist and can be read here.

Another article on the Kardia Band release suggests that the Smart Rhythm program at $99/ year is a requirement.

Perhaps, AliveCor’s David Albert can weigh in on whether the annual subscription is a requirement for making recordings or just allows the continuous monitoring aspect.

What Is Behind The Significant Changes In AliveCor’s Kardia Mobile ECG App?

The Skeptical Cardiologist is a strong proponent of empowering patients with atrial fibrillation by utilizing personal cardiac rhythm devices such as Afib Alert or AliveCor’s Kardia.

I’ve written about my experiences with the initial versions of the Kardia mobile ECG device and the service it provides here and here.

I have been monitoring dozens of my afib patients using AliveCor’s Physician Dashboard.

Recently AliveCor changed fundamentally the way their app works such that for new users much of the functionality I described in my previous posts now requires subscribing to their Premium service which costs $9.99 per month or $99 per year.

What Has Changed With The Kardia App

The Kardia device which works with both iOs and Android smart
phones is unchanged and still generates a “medical-grade” single lead rhythm strips which appears within the Kardia app.

Screenshot from AliveCor’s website showing the Kardia recording device being utilized with the obtained  typical ECG recording displayed on the smartphone app.

 

 

The app still is reasonably accurate at identifying atrial fibrillation or normal heart rhythms and offers a fee-based service for interpretation of unclassified ECGs.

However, for new purchasers of Kardia,  the capability to access, email or print prior ECG recordings has gone away. Prior to March of this year, Kardia users could access prior ECG tracings which were stored in the cloud  by touching the “Journal” button on the app. These older tracings could be emailed and they were available through the cloud for a physician like myself to review at any time.

Now new Kardia purchasers will find that when they make an ECG recording they have the option to email a PDF of the ECG but once they hit the DONE button it is gone and is not stored anywhere.

For my patients purchasing after March, 2017 this means that unless they  purchase Kardia Premium service I will not be able to view their ECG recordings online.

An AliveCor account executive summarized for me the changes as follows:

We added a significant number of features over the past year and a half, and grandfathered all users on March 16th, 2017. New users now have the option to download and use Kardia for free, but the premium services are $9.99/mo or $99/year. Kardia Premium allows unlimited storage and history of their EKGs, summary reports with longitudinal data, blood pressure monitoring and tracking weight and medication.

Why Journal Functionality Is Important

If you purchased your AliveCor/Kardia device prior to March 16th, 2017 ago the journal  functionality still works. Let’s call such customers “Journal Grandfathered”.

This Journal functionality is important in a number of ways:

  1. My Journal Grandfathered patients can bring their phones with them during an office visit and we can review all of their ECG tracings.
  2. Journal gGandfathered Kardia users can email their old tracings to their physicians or to anyone they wish (even the skeptical cardiologist!). They can also print them out and save PDFs of the tracings.
  3. I  can view through my online physician account all of my Journal Grandfathered patients. This means any time a patient of mine makes a recording that is unclassified or suggests atrial fibrillation I can be notified and immediately view it online.

This fundamental change took place as AliveCor attempts to convince  purchasers of the Kardia device to use their Premium service.

Why AliveCor Changed The Kardia App Function

Dr. David Albert, inventor and  cardiologist and the founder of AliveCor was kind enough to talk with me about this change.

He indicates that of the 150,000 AliveCor users, 10,000 are now using the Kardia Premium service. About 20% of new users elect Kardia Premium.

Prior to the change all AliveCor users had their old ECG recordings stored in the cloud in a HIPPA compliant fashion. This free service was costing AliveCor quite a bit and the company felt it was best to switch to a subscription service to provide this secure cloud storage.

With the change to the (relatively inexpensive)  subscription service, patients will get additional features. As the AliveCor account executive described:

Kardia Premium allows unlimited storage and history of their EKGs, summary reports with longitudinal data, blood pressure monitoring and tracking weight and medication.

 

 

I’ve looked at the Premium service and it seems quite useful when combined with a connected physician utilizing Kardia Pro.  I’ll evaluate the Premium service and the physician Kardia Pro service  further and write a full post on its features in the near future.

If you are not grandfathered and want to stick with the Basic Kardia service you still have an immensely useful and  inexpensive device which allows personal detection of your cardiac rhythm. Just remember to email yourself the ECG recording you just made before you hit DONE.

Nonarrhythmically Yours,

-ACP