Tag Archives: Moogfest

Let’s Celebrate Bob Moog’s Birthday Today: Be Creative!

Robert Moog , engineer and pioneer of electronic music synthesis, was born 86 years ago on this date.

The skeptical cardiologist first revealed his love of electronic music and Bob’s Moog synthesizers in a post about the annual Moogfest music festival (sadly not held this year due to Covid-19.)

In college I became obsessed with Moog synthesizers and this obsession has only increased with age.  I was inspired by Wendy Carlos’ Switched on Bach which features her renditions of Bach pieces performed on an early modular Moog synthesizer. The glory of Bach transmuted by otherworldly Moog voices was mesmerizing.

I and my college roommate,  APOD-to-be Jerry Bonnell , purchased components from PAIA electronics, and with the assistance of electrical engineer and pi-plate-to-be Jerry Wasinger  built our  own modular synthesizer.  After my post on the delights of Asheville and the Moog Factory Museum piece was published several readers contacted me and have turned me on to other synthesizer performance pioneers including Gershon Kingsley (who has subsequently died-see obituary at end of post.)

Around the time of the 20014 Moogfest I missed due to THE FLU I acquired a small Sub Phatty Moog.

I used it in a song I created based on Phillip K. Dick’s novel Radio Free Albemuth  as the sound of the superintelligent, extraterrestrial, but less than omnipotent being (or network) named VALIS:

Valis/Sub Phatty goes wild delivering its rebellious message for the last 50 seconds and then fizzzles out.

Subsequently, I’ve acquired a duophonic (Bob Moog Tribute Edition!) Sub 37 Moog. The built-in arpeggiator/sequencer on the Sub 37 allows for some really creative rhythmic and patterned music creation. You gotta love all those flashing lights and delightful knobs just begging to be twirled!

An Email from the folks at Moog Music suggests

More Ways to Celebrate Bob

  1. Create your own music with the free Minimoog Model D iOS app.
  2. Share a memory or musical creation online using #CelebrateBob.
  3. Try your hand at this interactive Google Doodle, originally shared by Google on Bob’s birthday in 2012.
  4. Watch Hans Fjellestad’s Moog documentary.
  5. Listen to this episode of The Music History Project’s podcast.
  6. Learn more about electronic music pioneers and Moog Music’s history.
  7. Encourage creativity all around you!

So here’s to my hero, Bob Moog!

Paraphonically Yours,

-ACP

N.B. Bonnell is one-half of the astronomy picture of the day and today’s picture is cool

Ghost Fungus to Magellanic Cloud
Image Credit & Copyright: Gill Fry

N.B.2 From the NYTimes obituary:

Gershon Kingsley, a composer who brought electronic sounds into popular music and wrote the enduring instrumental hit “Pop Corn,” died on Dec. 10 at his home in Manhattan. He was 97. His daughter Alisse Kingsley announced the death. Mr. Kingsley was an early convert to the Moog synthesizer in the 1960s. He used it to create music for commercials and to orchestrate perky melodies — most notably “Pop Corn,” an instrumental originally released on Mr. Kingsley’s 1969 album “Music to Moog By.” It became a best seller and was remade (usually renamed “Popcorn”) in hundreds of versions: by Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass, Aphex Twin and the Muppets, among others. A 1972 version of “Popcorn” by Hot Butter made the song an international hit, and a 2005 remake for the animated character Crazy Frog became a major hit in Europe.

Source: Gershon Kingsley, Master of Electronic Sounds, Dies at 97 – The New York Times

 

Moogfest, the Z-pak, the QT interval and Sudden Cardiac Death


kraftwerk
The skeptical cardiologist was planning on attending Moogfest 2014 in Asheville, North Carolina last weekend. I was going with the old friend and life coach of the skeptical cardiologist (OFLCSC) and planned on taking in electronic and synthesizer legends like Kraftwerk and Keith Emerson, riding bikes and drinking lots of craft beer. Unfortunately, a very bad upper respiratory infection took hold of me, progressing to what felt like a pneumonia (shaking chills, fever, coughing up dark, thick sputum, rattling emerging from the depths of my lungs) and I had to cancel the trip.

After processing multiple factors of risk versus benefit (not to mention the contribution to resistant bacteria), I decided to start myself on a Z-pak which is commonly utilized for community acquired pneumonia (does this mean I have a fool for a doctor?)

Azithromycin (the macrolide antibiotic in the Z-pak) , due to its broad antibiotic spectrum and perceived favorable safety profile, became one of the top 15 most prescribed drugs and the best-selling antibiotic in the United States, accounting for 55.4 million prescriptions in 2012.

The time between onset of electrical activation of the ventricles (Q) and the depolarization or reset of the ventricles (T) is called the QT interval. You can be born with a prolonged QT interval or it can become prolonged due to certain conditions. Prolonged QT intervals increase risk of sudden death
The time between onset of electrical activation of the ventricles (Q) and the depolarization or reset of the ventricles (T) is called the QT interval. You can be born with a prolonged QT interval or it can become prolonged due to certain conditions. Prolonged QT intervals increase risk of sudden death from abnormal rhythms like torsades de pointes type of ventricular tachycardia

Between 2004 to 2011, the FDA received 203 reports of azithromycin-associated QT prolongation (see graphic to the left) Torsades de Pointes (graphic) ventricular arrhythmia, or, in 65 cases, sudden cardiac death.

This prompted a review of Tennessee medicaid data which was published in 2012.

tdp
Torsades Des Pointes (fancy French word  for twisting of the points: note how the deflections seem to be oscillating slowly (somewhat like a sine wave I would have heard at Moogfest) . This is felt to be the way QT prolongation from medications like the Z-pak cause sudden death.

This study found that people taking azithromycin over the typical 5 days of therapy, had a rate of cardiovascular death 2.88 times higher than in people taking no antibiotic, and 2.49 times higher than in people taking amoxicillin. Most of the risk appeared to be those patients who had a baseline high risk of cardiovascular disease and the excess risk of death resolved after the 5 days of therapy.

As a result, the FDA added a warning to the azithromycin package insert and urged health care professionals to use caution  when prescribing it to patients known to have risk factors for drug-related arrhythmias, including those with long QT intervals, either congenitally or induced by drugs, low potassium or magnesium levels, slow heart rates or on other medications drugs used to control abnormal heart rhythms (amiodarone, sotalol and dofetilde). 

I survived my 5 day brush with a three-fold increased risk of sudden death and I really think the Z-pak substantially helped me get over the bacterial lung infection I felt I had. I knew my risk factors in detail and they were low. I was totally aware of any interacting drugs that could prolong my QT interval.

You can survive too. Make sure you definitely need the drug (i.e. you have a bacterial infection not just the common cold) and be cautious if you have any of the following

  • Family history of sudden death
  • Personal history of unexplained passing out or dizziness
  • Use of other medications that prolong QT interval (PDF)
  • Low potassium or magnesium levels (not uncommon in heart failure patients who are on water pills)
  • Severe heart disease of any kind

A complete listing is available here.

Meanwhile, Enjoy a sample of whatl I missed at Moogfest: Dorit Chrysler playing the theremin