Tag Archives: omron

Wally’s High Blood Pressure Tales: Of Dentists, Wrist Cuffs and an Experiment

Today’s post comes from the Wally, the life coach of the skeptical cardiologist,  who (ultimately) relates what happened when he agreed to do a blood pressure experiment in exchange for medical advice.


Blood Pressure Story 1

I used to work for a company that, for a short time, rewarded healthy employees with lower insurance premiums. They based your score on body-mass-index (BMI), cholesterol, and blood pressure (BP). At the time, I was riding a bike a lot so my BMI was acceptable. My cholesterol was also within range since I take a low dose of a statin. But, my blood pressure? I’ve been doing battle with my blood pressure since the 1980s. So, on the morning of the screening, I took precautions: no alcohol the night before and no coffee before the test. Let’s talk about coffee for a moment: I’m an engineer and we use coffee for fuel. Never hire an engineer who doesn’t drink coffee. In fact, here’s how I interview a new engineering candidate:

Me: “Do you like coffee?”
Candidate: “Yes”
Me: “How do you like it?”
Candidate: “Black.”
Me: “Congratulations, you have the job!”

Back to the morning of the screening: I had no coffee and I may have had low blood sugar. I got in my car and started backing out. It’s 6:30AM and dark outside – backing, backing, backing, CRUNCH. In spite of having a backup camera I still somehow managed to hit my daughter’s car. I’m sure that sent my BP up. Fortunately, I had calmed down enough to pass all of my tests by the time I got to the screening center 30 minutes later. 

Blood Pressure Story 2

On another morning I had to go to the dentist – I always go early so that I don’t miss any work. So, with three cups of coffee in me I hit the road. Of course, I didn’t take traffic into consideration and  I was 10 minutes late. The staff at the dentist’s office didn’t mind but I was a little anxious because 1) I hate to be late and 2) I was at the dentist’s office. 

They have me sit in the adjustable padded chair and ask me the usual questions about changes in the meds I’m taking. While that’s going on, I’m trying to remember if this is the visit where they take X-rays or the visit where they use a needle to evaluate the pliability and travel of my gumline. Trust me, the gumline eval is not fun and as I start to think it’s going to happen, the hygienist puts a small integrated blood pressure cuff on my wrist. Really? You’re about to poke sharp things into my mouth and you’re measuring my BP? Of course, it’s terrible. They measure again: not so terrible. And on the 3rd measurement? Back to terrible.

Ever hear anybody say, “The dentist sure was fun today!” No, you haven’t. That sentence has never been spoken – unless the valve on the nitrous tank was leaking. This guy though, he liked to visit his dentist:

Blood Pressure Story 3

The Beginning

I had a semiannual physical coming up and I realized I better follow my doctor’s advice from my last visit and measure my BP first thing in the morning – before the coffee. Now, I have an old blood pressure cuff that I bought at a garage sale about 20 years ago and it still worked. But I started wondering how accurate it was given its age. So I went shopping on Amazon and decided to buy the same wrist cuff that they use at the demented dentist office. The morning after it came, I measured my BP and… well it wasn’t very good. So, I called my good friend The Skeptical Cardiologist and asked for his advice. And he graciously agreed to help – for a price. We made a deal: he would guide me on my journey to a lower BP. In exchange I would collect some data and provide an opinion on the different cuffs.

In other words: I volunteered to be the SC’s Lab Rat. At first I was proud that he was considering me to provide invaluable data. But, as time went on, I started thinking this might have been his revenge for a laboratory mishap that I caused when we were undergrads. Anyway, on to the experiment!

The Equipment

LifeSource UA-767

Your basic brachial BP cuff purchased at a garage sale.

OMRON 3 Series Wrist Blood Pressure Monitor

New. Can save data to your phone via bluetooth. Small.

The Protocol

First thing in the morning:

  1. Take three measurements on the left wrist with the Omron
  2. Take three measurements on the left arm with the LifeSource
  3. Take three measurements on the right wrist with the Omron
  4. Take three measurements on the right arm with the LifeSource

The Data

I’m a lousy scientist. I started off with good intentions but pretty soon, I started forgetting the evening measurements. And then, when I saw that there wasn’t too much deviation between the measurements on my left and right arms, I only made left arm measurements.

Here are the first two days of data:

January 1st:

The BP measured on my right side was lower in the morning and higher with the wrist cuff in the evening.

January 2nd:

On the 2nd day, left and right were more consistent but the wrist cuff was higher in the evening. About this time, I was already getting annoyed with the wrist cuff and decided to return it. My reasons for this are detailed below. 

I continued to measure my BP in the mornings using just the LifeSource cuff:

Other than the data from 1/5/20, there appears to be reasonably good correlation between the left and right arms.

Note the 12 day gap between the last two data sets. That’s because:

Tragedy Strikes

On the morning of January 8th, the LifeSource UA-767 blood pressure cuff crashed and burned on my kitchen table. The root cause of the failure was a small molded rubber doohickey that acted as an attachment point for the air system in the meter. I now had no means of measuring my BP. The experiment was over.

Review and Wrap Up

First of all this was not a very scientific experiment. By changing my meds I was able to get my BP down but I failed to collect all the data that the SC asked for. The reasons for this were 1) I returned the Omron wrist cuff early, 2) I kept forgetting to take my BP in the evening (it was a little crazy at my house over the holidays), and 3) the LifeSource died.  But I had used both instruments long enough to form an opinion:

Omron

I had high hopes for the Omron wrist cuff – it was new, and it was small with none of the awkwardness of the more traditional brachial style cuff. But I quickly started finding flaws:

  1. A wrist cuff has to be carefully positioned to get accurate measurements. While Omron says that the edge of the strap should be 1/2” away from the bottom of your palm, I had better luck just centering the strap over the vein where your radial pulse is measured. And besides, exactly where is the bottom of my palm? I could see where that would confuse some people.
  2. I found that manipulating the strap on the wrist cuff with one hand to be a little more difficult than the brachial cuff. Now maybe if I had kept it longer I would have become more adept but right away I felt that this could also lead to some positioning errors.
  3. To make accurate measurements with the Omron requires that you elevate your wrist to the same height as your heart. You can do this one of two ways: 1) physically hold up your wrist for the duration of the measurement or 2) prop it up with a pillow. This step is not required with an arm cuff because once applied it’s already positioned at roughly the same height as your heart. 
  4. Home blood pressure monitors have small air pumps in them to pressurize the cuff – that’s the buzzing sound you hear when you press the Start button. Since the enclosure for the Omron monitor is smaller than the LifeSource device, it has to use a smaller air pump. And a smaller air pump needs more time to pressurize the cuff. So you have to sit there and hold up your wrist while waiting for the cuff to pressurize – I found this a little tiring.

On the plus side the Omron did come with a small plastic case and didn’t take up too much space. And it had Bluetooth which allowed me to save my measurements on my phone using their app.  

LifeSource

The LifeSource was a boring old fashioned BP Meter that got the job done – until it died. My only complaint about these devices is that they’re awkward to store. There’s the cuff, the base, and the rubber tube connecting the two. Combined these things always get tangled up with other stuff.

Conclusions 

The old fashioned arm cuff is the way to go based on my experience. Yes, they’re awkward but they are solid and less prone to error. Because of this, I replaced the LifeSource with an Omron arm cuff monitor. And for storage I also bought a small enclosure for it.  And as for my BP, I was able to get it down in time for my doctor’s appointment.


When Wally is not creating laboratory mishaps or providing life coach consulting he dabbles in electrical engineering, tells mysteriously hilarious jokes,  and runs a website called Pi-Plates.com.

We met our freshman year at Oklahoma University and Jerry claims my first words to him were “Are you ready for the country?”

Skeptically Yours,

-ACP

Omron’s HeartGuide Wristwatch Blood Pressure Monitor Allows BP Monitoring During Daily Activities Unobtrusively: Can It Replace Ambulatory BP Monitors?

I’ve been evaluating a wearable wrist watch blood pressure monitor for the last week.

After a Twitter interaction with Omron stimulated by Dr. Wen Dombrowski, the Omron people loaned me one of their HeartGuide devices.

Omron’s website describes the device as follows:

Engineered to keep you informed, HeartGuide is a wearable blood pressure monitor in the innovative form of a wristwatch. In tandem with its companion app HeartAdvisor, HeartGuide delivers powerful new technology making tracking and managing your blood pressure easier than ever before. Proactively monitor your heart health by turning real-time heart data into heart knowledge and knowledge into action. With HeartGuide wherever you go, you’re in the know.

I and the AHA have  not recommended wrist BP devices.  My decision was based on my personal research in the 1990s on arterial waveforms and the influence of wave reflection.  Studies have clearly shown a change in the arterial wave form as it proceeds from the ascending aorta to the periphery.

Therefore, the skeptical cardiologist was skeptical of the value of the HeartGuide

After wearing the HeartGuide for a week and using it in a variety of situations to measure my blood pressure I am rethinking my recommendation against wrist blood pressure cuffs.

I’ll give my full analysis of the device after more evaluation but what I’ve discovered is that it can serve as an accurate and unobtrusive daytime ambulatory blood pressure monitor.

Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) utilizes a portable BP monitor which includes a brachial BP cuff and a device that inflates the cuff every 20-30 minutes, makes a measurement and stores all the recordings for off-line review. Studies have shown ABPM is a better predictor of CV mortality than either clinic BP or home BP monitoring.

It has not been widely utilized in the US because it is poorly reimbursed.

The HeartGuide sits on my wrist and whenever I feel like it, wherever I am, I can quickly and simply make a recording of my BP.

 

 

With the HeartGuide I have made  BP recordings in a variety of situations which I would never previously have considered.

For example, earlier this week I wore the HeartGuide to work. I measured my BP at home and it was 125/76. After dropping my gear off at my office I walked to the 6th floor of the hospital to see inpatients. This involved going down several flights of stairs, crossing to the hospital via a pedway and climbing several flights of stairs.

When I emerged on the 6th floor I stopped (because the Heart Guide does not like it if you are moving), triggered the Heart Guide and put my right hand over my heart (the Heart Guide likes you to put your hand on your heart). Within 90 seconds I knew my BP (it had increased to 143/81).

In order to do this unobtrusively I wandered into the patient waiting area and pretended to be watching NFL highlights on the TV.  Nobody seemed to notice I was taking my BP!

Subsequently, I was paged to do a transesophageal echo/electrical cardioversion and went downstairs to our “heart station” where a room full of RNs, a sonographer, an anesthetist and a patient awaited me. While talking to the patient about the procedure I triggered the Heart Guide and made another BP recording. Nobody noticed!IMG_5220

The Heart Guide BPs are displayed on the watch face for a few seconds and can be sent via BlueTooth to the OmronAdvisor smartphone app.

The graph above shows my BP was high at 807 AM while I was talking to the patient and still up after the procedure.

One day I wore the HeartGuide to the gym and made BP measurements under a variety of conditions.

HG leg press

The HeartGuide will not activate while walking on the treadmill no matter how hard I try to keep my arm still. It does not like motion of any kind.

But the first reading on the left was immediately after running on the treadmill. I then performed an isometric leg press hold on a weight machine and was able to obtain a recording during this maneuver of 140/88.  Shortly after the leg press I repeated the recording and it had dropped down to 104/69.

I have to say this is an abundance of BP information that is quite interesting and heretofore I had never been aware of. It opens up intriguing clinical possibilities.

I will have to spend more time analyzing the Heart Guide before writing my overall impression and recommendations but thus far I see it expanding our toolkit for understanding hypertension and personalizing cardiovacular medicine.

Try to imagine yourself standing like me outside a restaurant unobtrusively taking your blood pressure and ponder the possibilities!

Soon you may find that wherever you go, you’re in the know. But be aware of the possibility of being arrested for loitering while checking your BP.

ap-HG.jpeg

Omnimanometrically Yours,

-ACP

If you’d like to read a detailed description of the HeartGuide check out this review while eagerly awaiting my more serious and more complete analysis.

Black Friday Sales Even A Skeptic Can Embrace

The skeptical cardiologist refuses to buy anything on Black Friday.  I don’t want to be manipulated into buying something just because it is cheaper for a while.

However, I have noticed that many of the cardiovascular products I recommend or have written about are substantially discounted today.

I present them in no particular order.

The QardioArm BP cuff which I have called the iPhone of BP devices is marked down from $99 to $69$ for a “limited time.”

While it is portable, stylish and accurate it is not, as Qardio ludicrously claims, “four times more effective at lower blood pressure.”

Omron, whose blue-tooth enabled BP devices connect to an online dashboard your doctor can visualize is offering 30% off through 12/31/2019 on all devices on their website.

I presume this includes the delightful Omron Evolv.

It may include the Omron Heart Guide, a wrist-based watch which measures BP. I’ll be writing my review of this device soon.

I’ve written a lot about the value of AliveCor’s Kardia Mobile ECG and the single lead device is marked down from $99 to $ 84 for Black Friday.

Finally, one of my favorite gadgets (see here), the Keyto ketone breath sensor sent me this email this morning.

I can’t vouch for the Keyto chocolate shake or the basil pesto that they are now including with Black Friday sales but I love the Keyto.

By the way, it wasn’t clear to me when I first got the Keyto device what kind of diet Keyto promotes. They favor a plant-based keto (with fish) diet which they consider “heart healthy.”  More on this down the line.

Appositely Yours,

-ACP

The Omron Evolv One-Piece Blood Pressure Monitor: Accurate, Quick And Connected

When it comes to self-monitoring of blood pressure the best device (assuming equivalent accuracy) is the one that patients are most likely to use.

The Omron Evolv has become that device for the skeptical cardiologist as it combines a unique one-piece design with built in read-out with a quicker, more comfortable  yet highly accurate BP measurement technique.

My previous favorite BP device, the QardioArm remains a close second.

Evolv Form and Function

The Evolv is sleek and stylish in appearance and has no external tubes, wires or connectors. It runs on 4 AAA batteries.

 

 

The  cuff is pre-formed and is incredibly easy to self-administer to the upper arm. Measurement is simple. Press the start button and it immediately starts inflating the cuff.

The results are displayed on an LCD screen on the cuff.

The Omron uses an oscillometric technique to measure the blood pressure as it is inflating. This “inflationary” technique has been shown to be as accurate as measuring during deflation but is much quicker. A study using the recently developed “Universal Standard Protocol” for evaluating the accuracy of BP devices showed that the Omron Evolv was highly accurate compared to gold standard sphygmomanometry.

Omron has come up with some slick marketing terms for the inflationary and pre-formed wrap aspects:

  • Intellisense Technology – Inflates the cuff to the ideal level for each use.
  • Intelli Wrap Cuff – For an easy and accurate reading

With the inflationary technique the cuff knows when to stop inflating, (hence “intellisense”) therefore, there is less tendency to go to higher pressures compared to the deflationary technique and less potential for discomfort from those higher pressures.

Evolv Communication-Sharing Results

The Evolv communicates via Bluetooth with the Omron Wellness (or Connect) smartphone app. Your BP  and heart rate measurements are easily transferred to this app and can be viewed over time.

My blood pressure and heart rate measurements over the last week.

If  one clicks on the little export icon at the upper right had corner of this summary screen you can “export CSV” which creates a file of BP measurements over a defined period that can then be emailed to yourself, your curious friends, or your doctor.

Another option is to export the summary report but this is a premium feature and requires payment.

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Monitoring Heart Rhythm and Blood Pressure-The Omron/Kardia Pro Connection

I’ve discussed in detail how management of my afib patients who have the Kardia mobile ECG device and connect to me via the internet using KardiaPro Remote has tremendously advanced their care.

AliveCor has partnered with Omron and the Omron Connect (or Wellness) app is essentially the Kardia app which my patients utilize to record their ECG recordings and share them with me.

With this app, therefore, patients who have the connection subscription service can utilize the Omron app to share both their ECG and BP recordings with me online. This is really quite an amazing development.

Below are recordings from one of my patients that I took from the patient screen which I view online.

The data can be viewed in various formats including this one which gives a good idea of daytime variation in BP as well as percentage recordings in goal range.

 

For me, this ability to rapidly view patient’s blood pressures over time in meaningful ways greatly facilitates management. If we could find a way to seamlessly import these data directly into our EMR it would an even bigger step forward.

Speaking To Your BP Cuff

I don’t use Alexa but Omron highlights how the Evolv works with Alexa:

 

 

Somehow, this doesn’t seem helpful to me but I tried asking Siri (with both my Apple Watch and iPhone) if she could give me info on my blood pressure and she failed miserably

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evolv-The Future of BP Management?

To summarize why I am so enthusiastic about this BP cuff

  • Portability and compactness. One piece design without tubes or wires.
  • Rigorously proven accuracy
  • Esthetically pleasing
  • Quicker and more comfortable than “deflationary” cuffs
  • Read-out on cuff-no separate unit or smartphone required
  • Communicates well with highly functional app for organizing or reporting BP measurements over time
  • Coordination of ECG measurements from Kardia and BP measurements on app through KardiaPro facilitates physician management of patient’s cardiovascular conditions.

Oscillometrically Yours,

-ACP

N.B. In the course of researching the Omron Evolv I looked at multiple home BP monitor review websites online. Almost without exception these were worthless.  I suspect many of these device review sites are funded by companies making the products. Others just aggregate information from company websites and regurgitate it without analysis. Websites with apparent consumer reviews are also suspect as I have found unscrupulous vendors are manipulating the whole review process.

Fortunately, your trusty skeptical cardiologist remains unsullied by any financial connections to corporate America. Or corporate Japan for that matter  (It appears Omron has its headquarters in Kyoto, Japan). However, Omron, if you are listening perhaps you can send me for my review one of your new Complete combined BP and EKG monitoring devices!

 

 

 

 

And one final detail. I checked just now and you can purchase the Evolv at Amazon for $69. Bundles that connect you to your doctor through the cloud and get you an Evolv plus or minus the Kardia ECG device at a reduced price are available through both the Kardia and Omron websites and apps.