Tag Archives: Remote ECG monitoring

Atrial Fibrillation In The Time of Coronavirus: A Call For More Personal Remote ECG Monitoring

What is the best strategy for doctors and patients dealing with atrial fibrillation during the COVID-19 pandemic?

Clearly, at this time everyone needs to minimize visits to the doctor’s office, emergency room, urgent care center or hospital. But patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation by definition will have periodic spells during which their heart goes out of rhythm and many of these will occur during this period when we want to minimize contact with individuals outside the home.

In my practice, we are able to manage the majority of these episodes remotely by using a combination of personal ECG monitoring, online cloud ECG review capability, and home adjustment of medications.

Given the presence of coronavirus in the community and the potential for overload of acute care medical resources, outpatient/home management of atrial fibrillation is more important than ever.

I have described in detail in previous posts how we utilize Alivecor’s Kardia device in conjunction with the cloud-based KardiaPro subscription service to manage our afib patients remotely.  (See here and here.) The Apple Watch ECG can also be utilized for this purpose but is more expensive than Kardia and has no online review service.

With this approach we are able to minimize ER visits and hospitalizations. In addition, use of long-term monitors (which also requires a visit to an outpatient center for hook-up) has been greatly reduced.

Given heightened anxiety during the pandemic we are also seeing many patients experiencing palpitations, which are not due to their atrial fibrillation. These can be due to benign premature ventricular contractions or premature atrial contractions.

If an afib patient calls with symptoms of palpitations or rapid heart beat and they have a Kardia device or Apple Watch ECG we can review the recorded ECG, and can quickly make a determination of the cause and best treatment. If they don’t have one of these devices we have no idea what the cause is or the best treatment.

General Advice For Afib Patients 

Obviously, it would be great if patients don’t have episodes of afib during the pandemic.

Paying attention to the eight lifestyle factors which influence afib occurrence I’ve recently posted on is even more important during this stressful period. In particular, afib patients should be limiting the inclination to consume more alcohol and utilizing healthier ways to reduce stress.

Regular exercise has demonstrated benefits in reducing afib episodes and also reduces stress. Gyms are closed or closing, but with spring arriving, outside exercise is always possible. Even if you don’t have exercise equipment in your home there are many exercises you can do inside that provide cardio, strength, and flexibility training. Consider bodyweight exercises, jumping rope, hoping on to a small chair, or go find your old Richard Simmons exercise VHS tape. My wife and I have been enjoying the Seven app lately which takes us through a variety of exercises without the need for equipment. There are tens of thousands of exercise videos on YouTube.

Some afibbers find that meditation or relaxation apps or yoga helps with stress control.

Finally, make sure you have plenty of your prescription medications on hand and that you take them as prescribed without fail. Many pharmacies have home-delivery available for prescriptions.

Regarding medications, please note that good blood pressure control also reduces afib recurrence. Do not stop ACE inhibitors or ARBs as I discussed here.

A Call For More Self Monitoring

Given the importance of staying home right now, afib patients who do not have a method for self monitoring their heart rhythms should consider acquiring a Kardia device or Apple Watch.

Antifibrillatorily Yours,

-ACP

N.B. As I’ve mentioned multiple times I have no connections, financial or otherwise to Apple or Alivecor.

KardiaMobile, the original single lead personal ECG is selling for $84 right now. It’s available also on Amazon.

In my opinion, there is no compelling reason to prefer the Kardia6l, which costs $149 over the single lead KardiaMobile.

Both of these devices work with a Google or iPhone app which is free. To store recorded ECGs on Alivecor’s cloud service requires a subscription fee.

When I enroll my patients into KardiaPro I send them an email invitation which allows them to purchase the KardiaMobile plus have one year of cloud storage and connection to my KardiaPro dashboard for $120. Thereafter the one year KardiaPro service is $60/year.

Apple Watch 5 starts at $399. ECGS are stored in the iPhone app. No cloud storage. ECGs can be emailed as PDF.

Patients with Apple 4 Watches or later can send a PDF of their ECG via email or fax to their cardiologist (https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT208955). Check with your cardiologist if they can view a PDF.

NOTE: Apple has closed all of their retail stores outside of Greater China until March 27. Online stores are open at www.apple.com, or you can download the Apple Store app on the App Store so you can still buy an Apple Watch or an iPhone too.

Cheaper personal ECG devices are available. I’ve reviewed several of these and don’t recommend them. (See here and here.)

Thanks to Mark Goldstein  and Dan Field for review/editing of this post.