Tag Archives: Starbucks

It’s National Coffee Day-Let’s Celebrate The Health Benefits Of Java!

The skeptical cardiologist admits to being a coffee snob and addict. For the last 10 years I’ve been using the Chemex system to brew my morning cup of Java. Once I consistently partook of Chemex pour-over coffee made from freshly ground, recently roasted quality coffee beans it was hard for me to enjoy any other kind. I find Starbucks coffee particularly loathsome.

Although numerous studies have established that coffee consumption is safe (assuming you are not adding  titanium dioxide to your cup), the belief that it is bad for you persists in the majority of patients that I see.

Since today is National Coffee Day let me take this opportunity to reassure my patients and readers who consume the good brew that they are not harming their hearts.

While it is possible to adulterate coffee into an unhealthy concotion (see my post on “How Starbucks Is Making Heart Healthy Coffee Into a Stealth Dessert”) overall coffee is heart-healthy.

In fact a recent study (Coffee Consumption and Coronary Artery Calcium Score: Cross‐Sectional Results of ELSA‐Brasil (Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health)) showed that coffee consumption is associated with less subclinical atherosclerosis as measured by coronary artery calcification (CAC).

The intro to this paper summarizes information known about coffee and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although early observational studies suggested coffee could increase risks:

More recent meta‐analysis of prospective studies showed that moderate coffee consumption was associated with decreased CVD risk, all‐cause mortality, and mortality attributed to CVD and neurologic disease in the overall population. High coffee consumption (>5 cups/d) was neither related to CVD risk nor to risk of mortality.12, To corroborate this evidence, the 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans show that consumption of 3 to 5 cups/d of coffee is associated with reduced risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus and CVD in adults. Consequently, moderate coffee consumption can be incorporated into a healthy dietary pattern, along with other healthful behaviors. Although coffee consumption has been studied in relation to various risk factors of CVD, only 4 studies have investigated the association between coffee intake and subclinical atherosclerosis, and the data available were limited and inconsistent.

Coffee is rich in phenolic compounds which have demonstrated anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antithrombotic properties which could lower cardiovascular risks. However, unfiltered coffee is rich in cholesterol‐raising compounds (diterpenes, kahweol, and cafestol) that can  increase total cholesterol, low‐density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides.which could worsen cardiovascular risk.

Consumption of filtered coffee however does not effect lipid levels adversely- presumably those nasty diterpenes are retained by my Chemex filter.

The Brazilian Longitudinal study looked at 4426 residents of Sao Paulo, Brazil who underwent a CAC measurement.  Information on coffee consumption was obtained from a food frequency questionnairre.

Those who reported high coffee consumption (>3 cups per day) had one-third the chance of a CAC>100 than nondrinkers. More coffee=less plaque build up in the coronary arteries. Less atherosclerotic plaque should = less heart attacks and strokes.

Scientific Consensus On The Healthiness of Coffee Consumption

In contrast to what the public believes, the scientific evidence very consistently suggests that drinking coffee is associated with living longer and having less heart attacks and strokes. Multiple publications in major cardiology journals in the last few  years have confirmed this.

You can read the details here and here. The bottom line is that higher levels of coffee consumption (>1 cup per day in the US and >2 cups per day in Europe) are NOT associated with:

  • Hypertension (if you are a habitual consumer)
  • Higher total or bad cholesterol  (unless you consume unfiltered coffee like Turkish, Greek or French Press types, which allow a fair amount of the cholesterol-raising diterpenesinto the brew)
  • Increase in dangerous (atrial fibrillation/ventricular tachycardia) or benign (premature ventricular or supra-ventricular contractions) irregularities in heart rhythm

Higher levels of coffee consumption compared to no or lower levels IS associated with:

  • lower risk of Type 2 Diabetes
  • lower risk of dying, more specifically lower mortality from cardiovascular disease
  • Lower risk of stroke

So, if you like coffee and it makes you feel good, drink it without guilt, there is nothing to suggest it is hurting your cardiovascular health. It’s a real food. These tend to be good for you.

Nonpoikilothermically Yours,

-ACP

N.B. The Chemex Coffeemaker was invented in 1941 by Dr. Peter Schlumbohm PhD. Made simply from non-porous, borosilicate glass and fastened with a wood collar and tie, it brews coffee without imparting any flavors of its own. On permanent display at MOMA NY and other fine museums, it is truly a work of art.

Despite Kaldi’s gastronomic abomination I’m still predominantly using their coffee beans.

The Brailian coffee study has numerous flaws like all observational dietary studies.

The caffeine in coffee can bring on palpitations. If you feel palpitations or other symptoms after consuming coffee you should lower the caffeine content or amount until you no longer experience troubling symptoms. Be guided by how you feel.

How Starbucks is Making Heart-Healthy Coffee into A Stealth Dessert

Chemex
The Skeptical Cardiologist’s preferred method of making coffee-hand poured over freshly ground beans, filtered through a Chemex filter (yes, I know it’s laborious and the pictures aren’t as pretty as Starbucks, but it is really good!)

Many of my patients believe that coffee is bad for them. I’m not sure where this belief comes from; perhaps the general belief that anything that they really like and are potentially addicted to cannot be healthy.

It’s not uncommon for a patient to tell me after a heart attack that they have “really cleaned up their act” and have stopped drinking alcohol and cut back on coffee. They seem disappointed when I tell them that moderate alcohol consumption and coffee consumption are heart healthy behaviors.

In contrast to what the public believes, the scientific evidence very consistently suggests that drinking coffee is associated with living longer and having less heart attacks and strokes. Multiple publications in major cardiology journals in the last few  years have confirmed this.

You can read the details here and here. The bottom line is that higher levels of coffee consumption (>1 cup per day in the US and >2 cups per day in Europe) are NOT associated with:

  • Hypertension (if you are a habitual consumer)
  • Higher total or bad cholesterol  (unless you consume unfiltered coffee like Turkish, Greek or French Press types, which allow a fair amount of the cholesterol-raising diterpenes into the brew)
  • Increase in dangerous (atrial fibrillation/ventricular tachycardia) or benign (premature ventricular or supra-ventricular contractions) irregularities in heart rhythm

Higher levels of coffee consumption compared to no or lower levels IS associated with:

  • lower risk of Type 2 Diabetes
  • lower risk of dying, more specifically lower mortality from cardiovascular disease
  • Lower risk of stroke

So, if you like coffee and it makes you feel good, drink it without guilt, there is nothing to suggest it is hurting your cardiovascular health. It’s a real food. These tend to be good for you.

Making Coffee Unhealthy: Dessert as Stealth Food

People have always added things to coffee – cream, half and half, milk, skim milk, sugar, artificial sweeteners. The coffee data doesn’t reveal to us what the consequences of these additions are, but given the consistent positive health associations of coffee, they must have had a minor effect.

However, in the last 20 years, the food industry, led by the behemoth Starbucks (which controls 1/3 of the coffee served in the US and has 11,000 stores and growing) has turned coffee into a stealth dessert. Starbucks offers the consumer (by their own admission) 87,000 different choices of coffee drinks.
A basic coffee house drink is a latte’. This consists of one or more shots of espresso combined with steamed milk (skim, 2% or whole) and topped with foam. According to Starbucks, the 16 ounce, medium (I refuse to use their size terminology), cafe latte’ made with 2% milk, contains 17 grams of sugar and 7 grams of fat, yielding a reasonable 190 calories. Those who drink these should understand that they are consuming a glass of milk, plus coffee. Dairy products have consistently been associated with lower cardiovascular risk. They would arguably be better off consuming a whole milk (11 grams fat, 16 grams sugar, 220 calories) latte’ as I’ve pointed out in previous blogs here and here.

 

 

( Cinnamon Dolce Latte . Picture taken from Starbucks web site.

Most of the latte’s consumed at Starbucks aren’t plain latte’s, however; they are nightmares of added sugar. Let’s take the Cinnamon Dolce Latte’: (A complete nutritional breakdown is available from Starbucks’ website (I do congratulate Starbucks for finally capitulating and presenting nutritional data on their products at stores, allowing the public to draw back the curtain on the Starbucks Oz. Their website provides a cool way to compare your drink with whole/2%/skim/soy milk or with and without whipped cream)) It contains 38 grams of sugar, 6 grams of fat, and 11 grams of protein, yielding 260 calories, 152 of which are coming from sugar. That’s 22 grams more sugar, compared to their unadulterated latte’. (There must be an internet site devoted to promoting the health benefits of cinnamon since I hear about them so often from my patients but this claim is not evidence-based)

 

 

mochae frap
Picture of the Mocha Frappacino “Dessert” from the Starbuck website

My 17 year old daughter’s drink of choice at Starbucks is the Mocha Frappuccino® Blended Beverage, which, according to Starbucks, is “Coffee with rich mocha-flavored sauce, blended with milk and ice. Topped with sweetened whipped cream.” It contains 60 grams of sugar, 15 grams of fat and has 400 calories.

Such concoctions have no right to consider themselves coffee, they should be labeled as a sugar-laden dessert that happens to have some coffee in it. To give some perspective, the typical 20 ounce soda contains 40 grams of sugar (the equivalent of 10 packs of sugar).  Starbucks has added 44 grams of sugar to coffee and milk in order to draw children, teens and unsuspecting adults to consume more “coffee.”

There is growing evidence that sugar, not fat, is the major toxin in our diet. The misguided concept that cutting fat in the diet and replacing it with anything, including sugar, will reduce cardiovascular disease is gradually being rolled back. Nutritional advocates are now zeroing in on appropriate targets like sugary beverages.

It’s sad that Starbucks, which started out making a good, real product that was actually good for you, has morphed into an international, growth-obsessed, behemoth that is pumping billions of grams of added sugar into our stomachs.

But, as the significant other of the skeptical cardiologist (SOSC) often muses, people are always looking for new ways to con themselves into thinking they are eating/drinking something healthy, when in fact, they are just eating/drinking cleverly disguised desserts. Starbucks has made a huge success for themselves by providing people what they want: a way to kid themselves.