Tag Archives: thanksgiving

The Marvelous Marion Nestle’ and Her Food Politics: From A2 Milk to Helpful Hops

The skeptical cardiologist follows a few blogs/websites regularly because they provide consistently good commentary or reporting on topics I’m focused on.

Prominent among these is http://www.foodpolitics.com which Marion Nestle’* writes.

Almost every post that she creates provides me with unique and fascinating information or understanding about food and the food industry.

Let me take a few recent examples.

Farmer’s Share of Thanksgiving Dinner.

On Thankgiving Nestle’ highlighted this report from the National Farmer’s Union which revealed that farmer’s get only 11 cents from the typical American family’s Thanksgiving dinner. It’s a particularly low portion of the overall money spent on the turkey that goes to farmers because:

“The major integrators who control the poultry markets have used their extreme bargaining power to suppress the earnings of the men and women who raise our chickens and turkeys while simultaneously taking in record profits for themselves,” Johnson said. “While poultry growers take all the risk of production, they are receiving just 5 to 6 cents per pound for turkeys and chickens. The integrators take those same turkeys and chickens, process them, and then mark up the retail value nearly tenfold.”

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A2 Milk: Healthier?

Nestle’ has written extensively about the pervasive influence of the food industry on nutritional research in her books including her recently published Unsavory Truth: How Food Companies Skew the Science of What We Eat.

She has long been at the forefront in pointing out that industry-sponsored research is highly likely to be favorable to the product the industry sells.

A2 milk, which has taken over a large share of the Australia and New Zealand dairy market based on shaky scientific studies which suggest it is healthier than the standard A1 milk is now being promoted in the US.

A recent Nestle’ post points out that

 claims for A2 milk’s better digestibility were based entirely on studies paid for by—surprise!—the manufacturer (as I explain in my latest book, Unsavory Truth: How Food Companies Skew the Science of What We Eatfood industry funding of nutrition research produces highly predictable results and, therefore, is not good for science, public health, or trust)

Stripping the Healthy Polyphenols From Corn

Nestle’ wrote recently of a study sponsored by Kellogg’s which demonstrated what happens to the healthy phytosterols in corn when it is processed:

In FoodNavigator, I read a report of a study finding that processing of corn into breakfast cereal flakes strips out phenolic compounds and tocopherols (vitamin E) associated with good health.

Just as processing of whole wheat into white flour removes the bran and germ, so does the processing of corn into corn flakes.

The germ and bran (hull) layers of grain seeds contain the vitamins and minerals—and the phenolics.  What’s left is the starch and protein (endosperm).

To replace these losses, manufacturers fortify corn flakes with 10% to 25% of the Daily Value for 12 vitamins and minerals.

This study is further evidence for the benefits of consuming relatively unprocessed foods.

Of particular interest to me is the authors’ disclosure statement:

This work was funded in part through gifts from the Kellogg Company and Dow AgroSciences.

The authors declare no competing financial interest.

This makes this study a highly unusual example of an industry-funded study with a result unfavorable to the sponsor’s interests.  The authors do not perceive Kellogg funding as a competing interest.  It is.  Kellogg (and maybe Dow) had a vested interest in the outcome of this study.

Beer Hops and Alzheimer’s

One of Nestle’s posts caught my eye as she mentioned a Japanese study**  which showed that beer hops help mice with Alzheimer’s.

If the findings hold true in humans we should all be chugging hoppy  IPAs with really high IBUs as the paper concluded:

The present study is the first to report that amyloid β deposition and inflammation are suppressed in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease by a single component, iso-α-acids, via the regulation of microglial activation. The suppression of neuroinflammation and improvement in cognitive function suggests that iso-α-acids contained in beer may be useful for the prevention of dementia.

Sadly, we must take this paper with a grain of malt, as the lead author works at “Research Laboratories for Health Science & Food Technologies, Kirin Company Ltd.” Kirin being a prominent Japanese brewery.

Nestle’s posts are short, well-referenced and consistently high quality.

I’m going to update my “blogroll” (something I’ve failed to do for several years) with Food Politics and I highly recommend signing up for email delivery of her posts if you are interested in food, nutrition and the interaction between the food industry and nutritional science.

Lupulusly Yours,

-ACP

N.B.

*Marion Nestle is Paulette Goddard Professor of nutrition, food studies, and public health, emerita, at New York University, and Visiting Professor of nutritional sciences at Cornell. She has a PhD in molecular biology and an MPH in public health nutrition from UC Berkeley. She lives in New York City.

**Nestle’s post actually references a different Kirin sponsored study in mice (Matured Hop-Derived Bitter Components in Beer Improve Hippocampus-Dependent Memory Through Activation of the Vagus Nerve) than the one I reference above which was truly related to Alzheimer’s.

 

The Skeptical Cardiologist Gives Dietary Thanks

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Something I’m not thankful for:Vitamin Water. It consists of water, 32 grams of sugar and lots of useless vitamins. People, stop buying this stuff. You are only helping Coca-Cola fill Americans with TOO MUCH SUGAR!

On this fourth Thursday of November, 2015 the skeptical cardiologist would like to record some Thanksgiving thanks.

  • I’m thankful I’m not a turkey today.

I hear Americans consume 45 million turkeys on Thanksgiving, one sixth of the total during the year.

Americans have embraced turkeys nutritionally because they are low in saturated fat and provide lots of protein. Most nutritional advice suggests avoiding the dark meat and the skin, but I prefer to seek those portions out because they taste better and as I pointed out here last Thanksgiving, Up To Date, the major medical reference for physicians, now says “Don’t Worry About Saturated Fat Consumption.”

  • I’m thankful that dairy fat is good for you.
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The Eternal Fiancee’ (For whose presence in my life I am eternally grateful) Cutting Tomatoes for Crabmeat Ravigote, a traditional cajun dish full of cholesterol from eggs and crustaceans

The eternal fiancee’ and I took a cooking class in New Orleans (New Orleans School of Cooking) recently, and butter seemed to be the basis for every dish we cooked: from dark roux in our gator sauce piquante’, to the blonde roux in the Louisiana meat pies.

When the  teacher of the class, chef Austin, asked the students to introduce themselves, I told him I was the skeptical cardiologist and I was there to evaluate New Orleans dishes for my patients.

Chef Austin didn’t think I would be recommending the dishes to my patients, but I heartily endorsed them ( See here and here).

  • I’m thankful that cholesterol is no longer considered by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans Committee (DGAC) a nutrient of concern.

All may eat eggs and crustaceans without fear now.

However, there is a backlash from the vegans on this revelation: the weirdly named Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM’s goal seems to be elimination of all animal testing and consumption, not responsible medicine) has erected billboards in Texas targeting the chairman of the House Agriculture Committee (K Michael Conoway (R-TX)).

The final guidelines have yet to be issued, but I’m betting on the egg industry over the vegans on this one, despite the billboards.

  • I’m thankful that studies continue to come out showing coffee is not bad for you.

This study, for example, followed 90 thousand Japanese for 19 years and found that the more coffee you drink, the lower your risk of dying-from cardiac, respiratory and cerebrovascular disease. Those consuming 3-4 cups/day were 25% less likely to die than those who never drank coffee.

-I’m thankful that correlation does not equal causation.

This means that I don’t have to stop eating bacon or beef brisket (assuming I am insensitive to global sustainability concerns). On the other hand, that association between higher coffee consumption  and lower risk of dying over 19 years doesn’t mean that drinking more coffee is actually lowering the risk; but it’s certainly not increasing it.

Screenshot 2015-11-26 11.50.04Finally, I’m thankful that moderate alcohol consumption is good for your heart and I raise a toast of gratitude to patient patients, readers and correspondents.

-ACP

 

Happy Thanksgiving: UpToDate Says Don’t Worry About Saturated Fat Consumption

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UpToDate now says high fat dairy OK!

Despite mounting evidence to the contrary, mainstream nutritional guidelines have, for the last 30 years, instructed Americans to reduce fat and, more specifically, saturated fat in their diets.

As I have written here and here, that advice is not supported by the bulk of evidence and is being challenged. Despite this, the USDA guidelines and the American Heart Association guidelines continue to recommend reducing fat intake.

On October 26, 2014 a highly respected online resource called UpToDate changed its recommendations in this area. I became aware of this when I found an outstanding blog post by Dr. Axel Sigurdsson. Dr. Sigurdsson is a cardiologist and the former president of the Icelandic Cardiac Society who writes a blog called Doc’s Opinion; his recent post is titled: “About Heart Disease, Nutrition, Healthy Lifestyle and Prevention of Disease.”

His post, entitled “We no longer recommend avoiding saturated fats per se” provides an outstanding summary of the importance of the change and I highly recommend reading it.

UpToDate is by far the most commonly utilized online clinical decision resource in the world. A recent paper surveyed physicians and found that

the 4 most frequently used resources were online journals (46%), PubMed/MEDLINE (42%), UpToDate(40%), and online books (30%). The overall rating for UpToDate was high due to the large proportion of residents who reported using this resource (77%).

My hospital pays for a subscription to UpToDate and the medical staff and residents (doctors in training) use it very frequently to access the latest information on preventing, diagnosing and treating diseases.  Hopefully, since the residents represent the future of medicine, these changed dietary recommendations will become more widespread and become the dominant nutritional message to the public.

The UpToDate authors wrote:

“Although it is known that there is a continuous graded relationship between serum cholesterol concentration and coronary heart disease (CHD), and that dietary intake of saturated fats raises total serum cholesterol, a 2014 meta-analysis of prospective observational studies found no association between intake of saturated fat and risk for CHD.

The meta-analysis also found no relationship between monounsaturated fat intake and CHD, but suggested a reduction in CHD with higher intake of omega-3 polyunsaturated fats; a benefit with omega-6 polyunsaturated fats remains uncertain.

Given these results, we no longer suggest avoiding saturated fats per se, although many foods high in saturated fats are less healthy than foods containing lower levels.

In particular, we no longer feel there is substantial evidence for choosing dairy products based on low-fat content (such as choosing skim milk in preference to higher fat milk). We continue to advise reducing intake of trans fatty acids.”

I’m particularly happy to see this change with respect to dairy products because I think the switch to non or low fat diary has been deleterious to Americans’ health and is not supported by data.

As Dr. Sigurdsson observes:

Today, blaming the rising incidence of coronary heart disease 40-50 years ago on the intake of red meat, whole-fat milk, cheese, cream, butter and eggs appears naive at best.

To condemn one macronutrient and suggest it be replaced with another, without having any scientific evidence that such and intervention is helpful, would today be considered careless and irresponsible.

Sticking with the same conclusion for 40 years, despite abundant contradictory evidence is shocking and hard to understand. Hopefully, UpToDate’s recent reconsideration of the issue is a sign that the tide is turning.

Of course, there’s no reason to promote high consumption of saturated fats and surely there will often be healthier options. However, it’s time we stop telling people that avoiding saturated fats may protect them from heart disease. Why should we say such a thing if it’s not supported by evidence?

It will be interesting to see how public authorities such as the American Heart Association will react to recent scientific evidence on the proposed link between saturated fats and coronary artery disease. Will we see a change in the forthcoming 2015 version of The Dietary Guidelines for Americans?

Will their approach be evidence-based or not? Will they accept that red meat, whole-fat milk, cheese, cream, butter and eggs can be a part of a healthy diet? Will they reconsider their recommendations as UpToDate has now officially done? Only time will tell.