Tag Archives: warfarin

My Top Four Practice-Changing Presentations From the ACC 2019 Meeting: From Alcohol To Aspirin

The ACC meetings in New Orleans have wrapped up and I must stop letting the good times roll.

In the areas I paid attention to I found these four presentations the most important:

1. After the historic back to back presentations of the Partner 3 and Evolut trials it is clear that catheter-based aortic valve replacement (TAVR) should be the preferred approach to most patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis.

Both TAVR valves (the baloon-expanded Edwards and the self-expanding Medtronic) proved superior to surgical AVR in terms of one year clinical outcomes.

2. The Alcohol-AF Trial. It is well known that binge alcohol consumption (holiday heart) can trigger atrial fibrillation (AF) and that observational studies show a higher incident of AF with higher amounts of alcohol consumption.

This trial was the first ever randomized controlled trial of alcohol abstinence in moderate drinkers with paroxysmal AF (minimum 2 episodes in the last 6 months) or persistent AF requiring cardioversion.

Participants consumed >/= 10 standard drinks per week and were randomized to abstinence or usual consumption.

They underwent comprehensive rhythm monitoring with implantable loop recorders or existing pacemakers and twice daily AliveCor monitoring for 6 months.

Abstinence prolonged AF-free survival by 37% (118 vs 86 days) and lowered the AF burden from 8.2% to 5.6%

AF related hospitalizations occurred in 9% of abstinence patients versus 20% of controls

Those in the abstinence arm also experienced improved symptom severity, weight loss and BP control.

This trial gives me precise numbers to present to my AF patients to show them how important eliminating alcohol consumption is if they want to have less AF episodes.

It further emphasizes the point that lifestyle changes (including weight loss, exercise and stress-reduction) can dramatically reduce the incidence of atrial fibrillation.

3. AUGUSTUS. This trial looked at two hugely important questions in patients who have both AF and recent acute coronary syndrome or PCI/stent. The trial was simultaneously published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The questions were:

Apixaban (Eliquis, one of the four newer oral anticoagulants (NOAC)) versus warfarin for patients with AF: which is safer for prevention of stroke related to AF?

Triple therapy with  low dose aspirin and clopidogrel plus warfarin/NOAC versus clopidogrel plus warfarin/NOAC: which is safer in preventing stent thrombosis without causing excess bleeding in patients with AF and recent stent?

Briefly, they found:

The NOAC apixaban patients compared to warfarin had a 31% reduction in bleeding and hospitalization. No difference in ischemic events.

Adding aspirin  increased bleeding by 89%. There was no difference in  ischemic events. (Major or clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding was noted in 10.5% of the patients receiving apixaban, as compared with 14.7% of those receiving a vitamin K antagonist (hazard ratio, 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.58 to 0.81; P<0.001 for both noninferiority and superiority), and in 16.1% of the patients receiving aspirin, as compared with 9.0% of those receiving placebo (hazard ratio, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.59 to 2.24; P<0.001).)

This means that the dreaded “triple therapy”  after PCI in patients with AF with its huge bleeding risks no longer is needed.

It also further emphasizes that NOACs should be preferred over warfarin in most patients with AF.

The combination of choice now should be a NOAC like apixaban plus clopidogrel.

4. REDUCE-IT provided further evidence that icosapent ethyl (Vascepa) significantly reduces major cardiovascular events in patients with establshed CV disease on maximally tolerated statin therapy.

The results of the pirmary end point from the REDUCE-IT were presented at the AHA meeting last year and they were very persuasive. At the ACC, Deepak Bhatt presented data on reduction of total ischemic events from the study and they were equally impressive. Adding the pharmaceutical grade esterified form of EPA at 2 grams BID reduced first, second, third and fourth ischemic events in this high risk population.

The benefit was noted on all terciles of baseline triglyceride levels. Thus, the lowest tercile of 81 to 190 mg/dl benefitted as well as the highest tercile (250 to 1401).

Although I dread the costs, it’s time to start discussing adding Vascepa on to statin therapy in high risk ASCVD patients who have trigs>100 .

As I wrote previously I didn’t learn anything from the much ballyhooed and highly anticipated Apple Heart Study . It’s entirely possible more participants were harmed than helped by this study.

Philomathically Yours,

-ACP

Two Spades or Two Diamonds, Two Ladies and Two Studies

I saw two delightful eighty-something ladies recently whose cases highlight some important points about atrial fibrillation, stroke and long term heart monitors.

Ms. M was playing bridge and found that she had 7 spades solid (solid, Mrs M informed me, means you have 7 of the suit with all of the honors (ace, king, queen, jack). Instead of bidding 2 spades which she meant to do, she bid 2 diamonds, and her partner responded by bidding 5 diamonds. This miscommunication resulted in a disastrous hand for the pair.

Ms. K  told me she had had an episode of “mass confusion” two weeks earlier during which for 15 seconds her “thinking process was not working properly.”

These cases illustrate the subtlety and brevity with which transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) or mini strokes can manifest. In contrast to the normal forgetfulness that is associated with aging, these women recognized  a sudden, transient and disturbing major alteration in their baseline mental processing.

TIAs are basically strokes that resolve quickly, generally within 24 hours, and leave no residual symptoms. They are often a warning that larger, more permanent strokes will follow.

In both of these cases, when I first saw the patients, they were in normal or sinus rhythm but subsequent monitoring revealed atrial fibrillation (AF).

Cryptogenic Strokes

A quarter of the 500,000 strokes occurring annually in America are unexplained (the medical literature tends to use the exotic and Halloween-appropriate term, cryptogenic for unexplained strokes). This means that imaging of the brain and arteries to the brain finds no abnormalities that would cause a stroke and that the patient has no history of AF. Since there is such a strong association between atrial fibrillation, clot formation in the heart, and stroke, (see my post on AF here) doctors assume that an otherwise unexplained stroke in a patient with AF is due to a clot leaving the heart and landing in an artery to the brain. These patients benefit from medications which reduce the risk of clot formation (either warfarin or one of the newer anticoagulants everyone has been hearing about either from negative TV ads from lawyers or positive direct-to-patient drug company ads).

New evidence suggests that if we monitor the heart rhythm for 30 days of patients who have had unexplained strokes a significant percentage will manifest atrial fibrillation.

A Canadian study of 572 men over the age of 55 who had had a cryptogenic stroke or TIA found that atrial fibrillation lasting 30 seconds or longer was detected in 45 of 280 patients (16.1%) in those who underwent 30 day monitoring, as compared with 9 of 277 (3.2%) in those who were only monitored for 24 hours.

Another study evaluated 441 patients following cryptogenic stroke with half randomized to receiving an insertable cardiac monitor (we call these implantable loop recorders (ILR) in the US). The ILR is a small device that can be inserted under the skin in the left chest region and allows continuous monitoring of the heart rhythm. After 6 months, atrial fibrillation had been detected in 8.9% of patients in the ILR group, versus 1.4% of patients in the control group. At 12 months it was 12.4% versus 2%.

Neither of my two ladies felt palpitations (a sense of the heart beating irregularly) that would have suggested a problem with the heart. About half of my patients with AF will feel their heart fluttering or “flip-flopping” or racing when the heart goes out of rhythm but the rest of my patients feel nothing. Thus, AF can be silent and I have many patients whose first symptom was a TIA or stroke.

These two ladies and two studies have taught (or reinforced for) me the following:

TIAs can be very subtle. Patients need to be aware of transient episodes of significant confusion or speech difficulties and report them to their doctors. We doctors need to pay close attention when patients report such episodes.

The patient who has had a cryptogenic stroke or TIA should undergo long term cardiac rhythm monitoring looking for AF. My take on the literature at this point is that we don’t need to do the more expensive and invasive ILR. I think a 30 day monitoring device that is capable of automatically identifying AF is sufficient.