Tag Archives: yogurt

Recent Papers Support The Cardiometabolic Health Benefits Of Full Fat Yogurt

A recent  Marion Nestle post,  Industry-funded studies of the week: Yogurt highlights three papers which strongly support the health benefits of consuming full fat dairy-in particular yogurt.

Nestle does a great job of highlighting food industry ties to nutritional research and publications on her excellent website Food Politics and in her books including “Unsavory Truth: How Food Companies Skew the Science of What We Eat.”

She notes that publication of these yogurt papers was paid for by a big player in the yogurt industry:

These three papers were part of a supplement to Advances in Nutrition published in September 2019: Supplement—6th Yogurt in Nutrition Initiative (YINI) Summit / More than the Sum of Its Parts, sponsored by Danone Institutes International. Publication costs for this supplement were defrayed in part by the payment of page charges.

Yes, these three papers were published in a supplement sponsored by the yogurt industry and therefore must be taken with a grain of salt.

However, a totally unbiased look at the data on yogurt and cardiovascular disease which I have provided here and here comes to the same conclusion. Misguided attempts to make full fat yogurt healthier by eliminating dairy fat have created artificial sugar-laden monstrosities which are actually stealth desserts.

It’s interesting that the dairy industry has been complicit in promoting the idea that low fat dairy is healthier because (as I pointed out here) it allows them to double dip the milk cash cow-skimming off the healthy fat and selling the separated fat and the residual skim milk separately.

The second paper ( Dairy Foods, Obesity, and Metabolic Health: The Role of the Food Matrix Compared with Single Nutrients) was based on a talk that Dariush Mozaffarian gave at the American Society of Nutrition 2018 Congress. I’ve been following Mozaffarian’s work since 2012 and I consider him to be an excellent researcher, writer and thinker who can be trusted to present unbiased information. The content of that talk presented by him at a national scientific congress in front of his academic colleagues is unlikely to be biased.

Here is what he concludes:

The present evidence suggests that whole-fat dairy foods do not cause weight gain, that overall dairy consumption increases lean body mass and reduces body fat, that yogurt consumption and probiotics reduce weight gain, that fermented dairy consumption including cheese is linked to lower CVD risk, and that yogurt, cheese, and even dairy fat may protect against type 2 diabetes. Based on the current science, dairy consumption is part of a healthy diet, without strong evidence to favor reduced-fat products; while intakes of probiotic-containing unsweetened and fermented dairy products such as yogurt and cheese appear especially beneficial.”

It’s important to look at the disclosures for any scientific paper and Mozzafarian has a lot of industry ties to disclose:

DM received an honorarium from the American Society of Nutrition for the preparation of this manuscript. A freelance science writer, Denise Webb, was supported by Danone Institute International to prepare an initial draft of this manuscript for DM based on a recording of his talk and slides at the American Society of Nutrition 2018 Congress. The final manuscript was edited in detail and approved by DM. The funders had no role in the design, analysis, interpretation, review, or final approval of the manuscript for publication…DM reports research funding from the NIH and the Gates Foundation; personal fees from GOED, Nutrition Impact, Pollock Communications, Bunge, Indigo Agriculture, Amarin, Acasti Pharma, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, and America’s Test Kitchen; scientific advisory board, Elysium Health (with stock options), Omada Health, and DayTwo; and chapter royalties from UpToDate; all outside the submitted work.”

The lead author of the third paper Nestle’ highlights ( Effects of Full-Fat and Fermented Dairy Products on Cardiometabolic Disease: Food Is More Than the Sum of Its Parts.)  is Arne Astrup another nutritional writer/researcher who I have a ton of respect for. He’s written extensively on the topic of saturated fat and dairy in multiple publications which were not tied to the dairy industry in any way.

Astrup concludes:

 “Although more research is warranted to adjust for possible confounding factors and to better understand the mechanisms of action of dairy products on health outcomes, it becomes increasingly clear that the recommendation to restrict dietary saturated fat to reduce risk of cardiometabolic disease is getting outdated. Therefore, the suggestion to restrict or eliminate full-fat dairy from the diet may not be the optimal strategy for reducing cardiometabolic disease risk and should be re-evaluated in light of recent evidence.”

His disclosures are extensive but they reveal how wide-ranging his interests are and how dedicated he is to optimizing diet.

AA is a member of advisory boards/consultant for BioCare Copenhagen, Denmark; Dutch Beer Institute, Netherlands; Gelesis, United States; Groupe Éthique et Santé, France; McCain Foods Limited, United States; Novo Nordisk, Denmark; Pfizer, United States; Saniona, Denmark; and Weight Watchers, United States. AA has received travel grants and honoraria as a speaker for a wide range of Danish and international consortia. AA is co-owner and member of the board of the consultancy company Dentacom Aps, Denmark; cofounder and co-owner of UCPH spin-outs Mobile Fitness A/S, Flaxslim ApS, and Personalized Weight Management Research Consortium ApS (Gluco-diet.dk). He is coinventor of a number of patents owned by the University of Copenhagen, in accordance with Danish law. He is coauthor of a number of diet and cookery books, including books on personalized diet approaches. AA is not an advocate or activist for specific diets and is not strongly committed to any specific diet.”

I love what he says at the end of his disclosure statement

“AA is not an advocate or activist for specific diets and is not strongly committed to any specific diet.”

Hooray! That is exactly what we need in the world of dietary recommendations.

I am particularly heartened by the conclusions of these two illustrious international nutritional authorities who have managed to cut through the long-standing nutritional dogma that all saturated fat is bad. As one who has no ties to any food or medical industry group and who is not an advocate or activitist for specific diets I concluded as they have that

  1.  Based on the current science, dairy consumption is part of a healthy diet, without strong evidence to favor reduced-fat products; while intakes of probiotic-containing unsweetened and fermented dairy products such as yogurt and cheese appear especially beneficial.”
  2. It becomes increasingly clear that the recommendation to restrict dietary saturated fat to reduce risk of cardiometabolic disease is getting outdated. Therefore, the suggestion to restrict or eliminate full-fat dairy from the diet may not be the optimal strategy for reducing cardiometabolic disease risk and should be re-evaluated in light of recent evidence.”

As I wrote in my letter to the FDA and in a recent critique of the AHA I would change the verbiage to “the suggestion to restrict or eliminate full-fat dairy from the diet is not a proven strategy for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity or diabetes and should be eliminated from current dietary guidelines.”

Two key points that these papers help emphasize:

  1. Eating fat doesn’t make you fat
  2. All saturated fat is not bad for your heart

It is important to look at industry influence on research and publications (along with other biases)  but it is hard to find an expert in these areas who hasn’t had some industry ties. Part of these ties develop because researchers who have concluded a particular food is healthy based on their independent review of the literature will be sought after as a speaker at conferences organized by the support groups for that food.

Fortunately, my evaluations remain unsullied by any food industry ties and, like Dr. Astrup, I am not an advocate or activist for specific diets and I am not not strongly committed to any specific diet.

Skeptically Yours,

-ACP

N.B. Trader’s Point Creamery Yogurt no longer distributes their wonderful products. I’ve started consuming Maple Hill 100% grass fed full fat yogurt and it is quite good.

N.B. #2.Arne Astrup’s bio.

Prof. Arne Astrup is Head of the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports at the University of Copenhagen, and Senior Consultant at Clinical Research Unit, Herlev-Gentofte University Hospital. Astrup attained his medical degree from UCPH in 1982 and a Doctorate in Medical Science in 1986. He was Appointed Professor of Nutrition and Head of the Research Department of Human Nutrition at The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Denmark, in 1990, he led the department throughout its development ever since.

His researches focus on the physiology and pathophysiology of energy and substrate metabolism and appetite regulation, with special emphasis on the etiology and treatment of obesity, including the role of diet composition and of specific  nutrients, lifestyle modification, very-low-calorie diets, exercise, and medication. Major research collaborations include participation in the EU multicenter studies.
He led research that showed that GLP-1 is a satiety hormone in humans, and was instrumental in Denmark being the first country to ban industrial trans-fat in 2014. He is author/co-author of over 600 original, review and editorial scientific papers and more than 1000 other academic publications such as abstracts, textbook chapters and scientific correspondence. He has supervised 32 PhD students to date.

Darius Mozzafarian’s bio (Wikipedia)

Dariush Mozaffarian (born August 19, 1969) is an American cardiologist, Dean and Jean Mayer Professor at the Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University, and Professor of Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine.

Mozaffarian is the author of nearly 400 scientific publications and has served as an adviser for the US and Canadian governments, American Heart Association, World Health Organization, and the United Nations.

Dear Dr. Gottlieb, Full Fat Dairy is “Healthy”. Why Are You Pushing Low-Fat Dairy?

By all accounts, Scott Gottlieb, the Trump appointed director of the FDA is doing a good job.

Vox points out, he has announced substantial FDA moves to reduce cigarette consumption and is committed to improving competition in generic drugs.

However, he gave a recent speech at the National Food Policy Conference  on “Reducing the Burden of Chronic Disease” which indicates he is misinformed on crucial aspects of nutritional science.

Gottlieb indicated he wanted the FDA to play a bigger role in guiding Americans to eat a healthier diet to reduce the burden of chronic disease.

To facilitate this he is looking to define what foods are “healthy”:

We’re keeping all these considerations in mind as we pursue rulemaking to update the definition of “healthy” so it’s based on nutrition criteria and food considerations that are more up-to-date than those being used for the current definition….

Once updating the definition, Gottlieb wants to label food as “healthy” In a way that makes it easier for consumers to understand:

To address this, we’ve had discussions about whether there should be a standard icon or symbol for the word “healthy” that everyone could use on food packages.

Gottlieb goes on to bemoan a focus on nutrients rather than foods but in the very  next sentence recommends a food, dairy, in a form that has one important nutrient stripped from it-fat.

Traditionally, we’ve focused primarily on the nutrients contained in food in considering what is healthy. But people eat foods, not nutrients.

This is why we’re asking the important question of whether a modernized definition of “healthy” should go beyond nutrients to better reflect dietary patterns and food groups, like whole grains, low fat dairy, fruits and vegetables and healthy oils?

Obviously, the first step in getting Americans to eat healthier is to make sure you are doling out the correct advise and in his speech Dr. Gottlieb indicates he has bought into  long-standing fundamental errors. I wrote him the following letter hoping to correct these errors.


Dear Dr. Gottlieb,

Congratulations on your recent appointment as FDA director and kudos for your fine work to date. I read your recent comments on developing an updated definition of “healthy” and the importance of  conveying that information to American consumers  I applaud your efforts in this area as well as your ongoing efforts to limit cigarette smoking and improve generic competition.

I am fine with guiding consumers to healthy foods but I beg of you, let this determination of what is healthy be guided by the actual science, not prior dogma.

In your recent speech you indicate that Americans are not consuming enough dairy and you recommend low-fat dairy which implies that you and the FDA believe that scientific studies have demonstrated that dairy fat is unhealthy.

Five years ago I, too , thought dairy fat was unhealthy and recommended my patients avoid butter, full-fat yogurt and cheese. However, when challenged on this belief, I reviewed the scientific literature on dairy fat and cardiovascular disease.

It turns out when objectively analyzed (as I have written about here and here ) there is no scientific evidence that supports the concept that dairy processed to remove dairy fat is healthier than the original unadulterated product.

In fact, evidence suggests full fat dairy reduces central obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis in general.

As a result of misguided recommendations to avoid dairy fat, it is virtually impossible in most grocery stores to find full fat yogurt or milk. The vast majority of the dairy aisle is devoted to various low or non fat concoctions which have had loads of sugar and chemicals added and are arguably worse than a Snickers bar.

Dr. Gottlieb ,I am not cherry-picking the data here or relying on out of date studies. I’ve reviewed everything I can find on this issue and reviewed it without bias. Evidence continues to accumulate supporting the healthiness of full fat dairy.

For example, here’s a 2018 review from researchers totally unaffiliated with the dairy industry which asks the question “Dairy Fats and Cardiovascular Disease: Do We Really Need to Be Concerned?”

After a exhaustive review they conclude the answer is no.

recent research and meta-analyses have demonstrated the benefits of full-fat dairy consumption, based on higher bioavailability of high-value nutrients and anti-inflammatory properties. … In general, evidence suggests that milk has a neutral effect on cardiovascular outcomes but fermented dairy products, such as yoghurt, kefir and cheese may have a positive or neutral effect.

Flawed Reasons for Low Fat Dairy Recommendations

As I have written previously, I believe there are three reasons for the failure of major nutritional recommendations such as the 2015  Dietary Guidelines For Americans  to correct previously  flawed advice to choose  non or low-fat dairy over full fat:

1. In  few randomized dietary studies showing benefits of a particular diet over another, non fat or low fat dairy was recommended along with a portfolio of other healthy dietary changes.

The overall benefit of the superior diet had nothing to do with lowering the dairy fat but was due to multiple other changes.

2. The dairy industry has no motivation to promote full fat dairy. In fact, they do better financially when they can take the fat out of milk and sell it for other purposes such as butter, cheese, and cream. (Please read my interview with a plastic surgeon dairy farmer on the skim milk scam here.)

3. Saturated fat is still mistakenly being treated as a monolithic nutritional element.  Although dairy fat is mostly saturated, the individual saturated fats vary widely in their effects on atherogenic lipids and atherosclerosis. In addition, the nature of the saturated fat changes depending on the diet of the cow.

4. Since authorities have been making this low fat dairy recommendation for so long they are extremely reluctant to reverse their advice. It lowers their credibility.

There Is No Scientific Consensus On What Constitutes A Healthy Oil

Finallly, Dr. Gottlieb, I would like to briefly point out that there is considerable ongoing scientific debate about what constitutes a “healthy oil.”

I summarized this last year on a post on coconut oil (which I fear you will also pronounce “unhealthy”).

In many respects, the vilification of coconut oil by federal dietary guidelines and the AHA resembles the inappropriate attack on dairy fat and is emblematic of the whole misguided war on dietary fat. In fact, the new AHA advisory  after singling out coconut oil goes on to cherry-pick the data on dairy fat and cardiovascular disease in order to  support their faulty recommendations for choosing low or nonfat dairy.

Canola and corn oil, the products of extensive factory processing techniques, contain mostly mono or polyunsaturated fats which have been deemed “heart-healthy” on the flimsiest of evidence.

The most recent data we have on replacing saturated fat in the diet with polyunsaturated fat comes from the Minnesota Coronary Experiment performed from 1968 to 1973, but published in 2016 in the BMJ.

Data from this study, which substituted liquid corn oil in place of the usual hospital cooking fats, replaced corn oil margarine for butter and added corn oil to numerous food items, showed no overall benefit in reducing mortality. In fact, individuals over age 65 were more likely to die from cardiovascular disease if they got the corn oil diet.

So, Dr. Gottlieb, please continue your efforts to make Americans healthier but make sure the current scientific evidence actually supports your recommendations. Keep in mind, the disastrous public health experiments of previous decades.


Skeptically Yours,

-ACP

N.B. Some of my posts on dairy fat are below.

Dairy Fat Makes You Thinner

The Skim Milk Scam

More Evidence That Diary Fat is associated with a lower risk of heart disease

What happens to cholesterol levels when you switch to low or non fat dairy?

Dietary Guidelines 2015: Why Lift Fat and cholesterol limits but still promote low fat dairy?

In defense of real cheese.


h/t to the always excellent Conscien Health for bringing Gottlieb’s speech to my attention.


Credit for the featured image of dairy cows from the wonderful Trader’s Point Creamery

The Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Now Recommends Full Fat Dairy For Your Kid’s Lunch Boxes

The skeptical cardiologist became overjoyed while reading an email from The Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (THTHCSPH) which outlined  their recommendations for packing kids‘ lunch boxes.:

The Kid’s Healthy Eating Plate was created as a fun and easy guide to encourage children to eat well and keep moving. The plate guidelines emphasize variety and quality in food choices.

The majority of the recommendations were pretty straightforward and mainstream:

The formula is simple: Fill half your plate (or lunch box) with colorful fruits or vegetables(aim for two to three different types). Fill about one-quarter with whole grains like whole grain pasta, brown rice, or quinoa, and the remaining quarter with healthy proteinslike beans, nuts, fish or chicken. Healthy fatsand a small amount of dairy (if desired) round out a tasty meal that will fuel an active, healthy lifestyle.

What caught my attention was the comment about dairy.

The dreaded words skim or low-fat did not appear in the sentence!

It would appear that a highly respect and mainstream source of nutritional advice is not making the typical (and scientifically unsupported ) recommendation to consume low fat or skim dairy products!

Indeed, if we look at their expanded comments on dairy they read:

Incorporating dairy (if desired). For example: unflavored milk, plain Greek yogurt, small amounts of cheese like cottage cheese, and string cheese.

No mention of fat content. Zip. Zero. To me, if you don’t put non fat low fat or skim next to the word diary it implies full fat.

Following their yogurt link we find no reference to preferentially consuming low fat yogurt despite the fact that the vast majority of yogurt sold in the US has been processed to remove healthy dairy fat, something the THCHSPH must be painfully aware of. (My wonderful MA Jenny’s husband, Frank, until very recently was unable to find full fat yogurt at Schnuck’s.)

As I pointed out here, a huge scam was foisted on Americans when allegedly healthy non fat yogurt filled with added sugar began to be promoted as a healthy treat.

It is almost  as if the THTHCSPH  has become agnostic about dairy fat and therefore is trying not to make recommendations.

Elsewhere on the THTHCSPH site however the old unwarranted advice  to avoid dairy fat rears its ugly head. On a page devoted to calcium we read:

Many dairy products are high in saturated fats and a high saturated fat intake is a risk factor for heart disease”

Then this interesting (and ?ironic) observation:

And while it’s true that most dairy products are now available in fat-reduced or nonfat options, the saturated fat that’s removed from dairy products is inevitably consumed by someone, often in the form of premium ice cream, butter, or baked goods.

Strangely, it’s often the same people who purchase these higher fat products who also purchase the low-fat dairy products, so it’s not clear that they’re making great strides in cutting back on their saturated fat consumption.

The THTHCSPH seems conflicted, as well they should. They want to keep up the nutritional party line that they have been spouting for 30 years that all saturated fats are bad but they now realize that supporting non fat dairy products has likely worsened rather than improved the diet of millions of Americans.

Galactosely Yours,

-ACP

N.B. The overall Kid’s healthy eating plate is not likely to be a favorite of kids  and I disagree with some aspects of it.

Namely, I think it is fine to have red meat and processed meats in moderation and I wouldn’t push the pasta, rice, and bread.

 

 

 

 

The Skim Milk Scam: Words of Wisdom From a Doctor Dairy Farmer

The skeptical cardiologist only consumes full fat dairy and recommends this to his patients.

Full fat dairy is associated with less abdominal fat, lower risk of diabetes and lower risk of developing vascular complications such as stroke and heart attack.
quart_whole_milk_yogurt-293x300I’ve been consuming  full fat yogurt and milk  from Trader’s Point Creamery in Zionsville, Indiana almost exclusively since visiting the farm and interviewing its owners a few years ago.

Dr. Peter(Fritz) Kunz, a plastic surgeon, and his wife Jane, began selling milk from their farm after researching methods for rotational grazing , a process which allows  the cows to be self-sustaining: the cows feed themselves by eating the grass and in turn help fertilize the fields,  . After a few years of making sure they had the right grasses and cows, the Kunz’s opened Traders Point Creamery in 2003.

Two more studies (summarized nicely on ConscienHealth, an obesity and health blog)  came out recently solidifying the extensive data supporting the health of dairy fat and challenging the nutritional dogma that all Americans should be consuming low-fat as opposed to full fat dairy.

The Dairy Industry’s Dirty Little Secret

Dr. Kunz opened my eyes to the dirty little secret of the dairy industry when i first talked to him: dairy farmers double their income by allowing milk to be split into its fat and non-fat portions therefore the industry has no motivation to promote full fat dairy over nonfat dairy.

Recently, I  presented him with a few follow-up questions to help me understand why we can’t reverse the bad nutritional advice to consume low-fat dairy.

Skeptical Cardiologist: “When we first spoke and I was beginning my investigation into dairy fat and cardiovascular disease you told me that most dairy producers are fine with the promotion of non fat or low fat dairy products because if consumers are choosing low fat or skim dairy this allows the dairy producer to profit from the skim milk production as well as the dairy fat that is separated and sold for butter, cheese or cream products.”
I  don’t have a clear idea of what the economics of this are. Do you think this, for example, doubles the profitability of a dairy?

Dr. Kunz:Yes, clearly. Butter, sour cream, and ice cream are highly profitable products… All these processes leave a lot of skim milk to deal with, and the best opportunity to sell skim milk is to diet-conscious and heart-conscious people who believe fat is bad.”

Skeptical Cardiologist:” I’ve been baffled by public health recommendations to consume low fat dairy as the science would suggest the opposite. The only reason I can see that this persists is that the Dairy Industry Lobby , for the reason I pointed out above, actually has a vested interest from a profitability standpoint in lobbying for the low fat dairy consumption.. Do you agree that this is what is going on? ”

 Dr. Kunz: “Yes, definitely. The obsession with low-fat as it relates to diet and cardiac health has been very cleverly marketed. Fat does NOT make you fat. 

Skeptical Cardiologist: “Also, I have had trouble finding out the process of production of skim milk. I’ve come across sites claiming that the process involves injection of various chemical agents but I can’t seem to find a reliable reference source on this. Do you have any information/undestanding of this process and what the down sides might be? I would like to be able to portray skim milk as a “processed food” which, more and more, we seem to be recognizing as bad for us.”

Dr. Kunz: “The PMO pasteurized milk ordinance states that when you remove fat you have to replace the fat soluble vitamins A & D. Apparently the Vitamin A & D have to be stabilized with a chemical compound to keep them miscible in basically an aqueous solution. The compound apparently contains MSG!! We were shocked to find this out and it further confirmed that we did not want to do a reduced fat or skim milk product.”

Skeptical Cardiologist: ” Any thoughts on A2? Marion Nestle’, of Food Politics fame, was recently in Australia where there is a company promoting A2 milk as likely to cause GI upset. It has captured a significant share of the Aussie market.”

Dr. Kunz: “We have heard of this and have directed our farm to test and replace any A1 heterozygous or homozygous cows.  We believe that very few of our herd would have A1 genetics because of the advantage of using heritage breeds like Brown Swiss and Jersey instead of Holstein.  Because few people are actually tested for lactose intolerance and because of the marketing of A2, it’s imperative not to be left behind in this – whether or not it turns out to be a true and accurate cause of people’s GI upset.

Skeptical Cardiologist:” I like that your milk is nonhomogenized. Seems like the less “processing” the better for food.  I haven’t found any compelling scientific reasons to recommend it to my patients, however. Do  you have any?”

Dr. Kunz: The literature is fairly old on this subject, but xanthine oxidase apparently can become encapsulated in the fat globules and it can be absorbed into the vascular tree and cause vascular injury.  I will look for the articles.  Anyway, taking your milk and subjecting it to 3000-5000 psi (homogenization conditions) certainly causes damage to the delicate proteins and even the less delicate fat globules.  Also remember that dietary cholesterol is not bad but oxidized cholesterol is very bad for you. That’s why overcooking egg yolks and high pressure spray drying to make powder products can be very dangerous – like whey protein powders that may contain some fats.

Skeptical Cardiologist: I spend a fair amount of time traveling in Europe and am always amazed that their milk is ultrapasteurized and sits unrefrigerated on the shelves. any thoughts on that process versus regular pasteurization and on pasteurization in general and its effects on nutritional value of dairy.

Dr. Kunz :“Absolutely crazy bad and nutritionally empty.. don’t know why anyone would buy it. The procedure is known as aseptic pasteurization and is how Nestle makes its wonderful Nesquik. If they made a full fat version of an aseptically pasteurized product it may have more oxidized cholesterol and be more harmful than no fat!!”
So there you have it, Straight from the  doctor dairy farmer’s mouth:
Skimming the healthy dairy fat out of  milk is a highly profitable process. Somehow, without a shred of scientific support,  the dairy industry, in cahoots with misguided and close-minded nutritionists, has convinced the populace that this ultra-processed skim milk pumped full of factory-produced synthetic vitamins is healthier than the original product.
Lactosingly Yours
-ACP
The two  recent articles supporting full fat dairy are:

Circulating Biomarkers of Dairy Fat and Risk of Incident Diabetes Mellitus Among US Men and Women in Two Large Prospective Cohorts

which concluded ‘In two prospective cohorts, higher plasma dairy fatty acid concentrations were associated with lower incident diabetes. Results were similar for erythrocyte 17:0. Our findings highlight need to better understand potential health effects of dairy fat; and dietary and metabolic determinants of these fatty acids

and from Brazilian researchers

Total and Full-Fat, but Not Low-Fat, Dairy Product Intakes are Inversely Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Adults1

 

What Happens To Cholesterol Levels When You Switch To Low Or Non Fat Dairy

When individuals  discover that they have abnormal  cholesterol readings they are often told to initiate  lifestyle changes to try to correct them.

Based on what physicians and patients have been taught  over the last twenty years, the likely dietary change recommended and the easy , first step is likely  to be to cut back on dairy fat.

IMG_6135
Yoplait Original-25% Less Sugar.(but still with 18 grams per 6 oz serving). A typical supermarket/doctor’s lounge yogurt with lots of ingredients added in (sugar, modified corn starch, Vitamin A Acetate, Vitamin D3)to replace the natural good taste and nutrients found in dairy fat.
IMG_6272 (1)
Traders Point Creamery plain yogurt. Ingredients= milk and cultures. Taste =fantastic. Grams of sugar=zero.

After all, it’s a pretty easy transition to start using skim milk and non fat yogurt because these line the supermarket shelves and have been filled with chocolate or added sugar to taste more palatable.

You might miss the great taste that butter adds to bread or cooking but for your health you would be willing to switch to non butter spreads and cut down on the cheese in your diet because  based on what you have heard from numerous media sources this is a giant step toward reducing your cholesterol numbers.

 

 

 

 


 

Unfortunately, it is a horribly misguided  step.

Although, the switch to low or non fat dairy lowers your cholesterol numbers, it is  not lower cholesterol numbers that you want: what you want is a lower risk of developing stroke or heart attack or the other complications of atherosclerosis.

Let me repeat: Don’t worry about your cholesterol numbers, worry about your overall risk of developing heart attack or stroke.

Due to 30 years of misinformation, the concept that lowering your cholesterol means lower risk of heart disease has become firmly entrenched in the public’s consciousness-but in the case of dietary intervention this has never been documented.

I take care of a 69 year old woman who has an abnormal heart rhythm and chest pain. As part of her evaluation for chest pain we performed a coronary CT angiogram (CCTA) which showed advanced but not obstructive atherosclerotic plaque in her right and left anterior descending coronary arteries.

This lady was not overweight, followed a healthy diet and exercised regularly. Her mother, a sedentary, heavy smoker, suffered a heart attack at age 54.

Her PCP had obtained lipid values on her 6 months before I saw her which were abnormal but the patient had been reluctant to start the recommended statin drug because of concerns about side effects.

After seeing her CCTA I advised that she begin atorvastastin 10 mg daily and aspirin to help reduce her long term risk of heart attack, stroke.

She decided without telling me not to take the statin, again due to side effect concerns, but started the aspirin, and began to pursue what she felt were healthy dietary changes.

When I saw her back in the office she told me  “I don’t eat butter or cheese anymore and I’ve switched to skim milk.” She had substituted olive oil for butter.

Here are her lipid values before and after her dietary changes (TC=total cholesterol, LDL= bad cholesterol, HDL=good cholesterol, trigs=triglycerides)

Date              TC             LDL       HDL   trigs            ASCVd 10 year risk

3/2015         275          173       72       149                         7.9%

10/2015      220           122       43      274                         8.3%

At first glance, and especially if we focus only on the total and bad cholesterol, this appears to be a successful response to dietary changes:  a 29% reduction in the bad cholesterol and a 25% drop in the total cholesterol.

However, although the LDL or bad cholesterol has dropped a lot, the HDL or good cholesterol has dropped by  more: 40%!

This is the typical change when patients cut out dairy fat-the overall ratio of bad  to good cholesterol actually rises.

In addition, the pattern she has now, with a low HDL and high triglycerides is typical of the metabolic syndrome which is recognized as likely to contribute to early  atherosclerosis: so-called “atherogenic dyslipidemia.”

When I plugged both sets of numbers into the ASCVD 10 year risk calculator app (see here) her estimated 10 year risk of heart attack and stroke had actually increased from 7.9% to 8.3%.

Hopefully, this anecdote will reinforce what population studies show:

  • There is NO evidence that dairy fat consumption increases risk of cardiovascular disease (see here)
  • Current recommendations to consume non or low fat dairy (often  accompanied by increase in added sugars) are not supported by scientific studies.

Finally, my patient is another example of an inherited tendency to development of premature atherosclerosis: her diet, exercise, body weight were all optimal and could not be tweaked to lower her risk.

Such patients must deal with the cardiovascular cards they have been dealt. If they have advanced atherosclerosis, as much as they may dislike taking medications, statins are by far the most effective means of reducing their long term risk of heart attack and stroke.

 

 

 

More Evidence That Dairy Fat Is Associated With A Lower Risk of Heart Disease

Although most nutritional authorities are now admitting that reducing saturated fat consumption by substituting carbohydrates was really bad advice, they, for the most part, are still sticking to the overall concept of limiting all saturated fats to <10% of daily calories and substituting “healthy” polyunsaturated fats for “unhealthy” saturated fats whenever possible.

The recently published (and highly criticized) Dietary Guidelines For Americans state:

The recommendation to limit intake of calories from saturated fats to less than 10 percent per day is a target based on evidence that replacing saturated fats with unsaturated fats is associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. The limit on calories from saturated fats is not a UL set by the IOM. For most calorie levels, there are not enough calories available after meeting food group needs to consume 10 percent of calories from added sugars and 10 percent of calories from saturated fats and still stay within calorie limits.

Recommendations to limit saturated fatty acids (SFAs) to <10% of calories persist, despite a spate of recent meta-analyses showing no relationship between saturated fat consumption and coronary heart disease (CHD, also known as ischemic heart disease (IHD)).

In addition, it should be abundantly clear by now that not all SFAs behave the same with respect to our lipids or our IHD risk.

Wide Variety Of Saturated Fats

Most SFAs come from animal origins, including meat and dairy products. The types of SFAs differ markedly between meat and dairy products; the associated nutrients and their interaction with SFAs also differs widely and all of this is likely to affect the risk of IHD.

There is quite a bit of evidence that dairy fat actually lowers the risk of IHD.

For example, in the MESA  (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) study, each 5-g/d intake of dairy SFAs was associated with a 16% lower risk of IHD, whereas each 5-g/d intake of meat SFAs was related to a 29% higher risk of IHD.

Despite this, current guidelines continue to repeat the unsubstantiated recommendation to consume low fat dairy over full fat dairy.

Lower Risk Of Heart Disease With Dairy Saturated Fats

Hopefully, a paper just published in the American Journal of Nutrition, will provide the nail in the coffin of the concept that all saturated fats are similar in their affects on blood lipids and cardiovascular risk and should be restricted.

This study found that higher intakes of SFA in 35,597 Dutch men and women were associated with lower risks of ischemic heart disease (IHD).

In other words, the more SFA the Dutch eat, the less their chance of having a heart attack.

And, the association “did not depend on the substituting macronutrient.” Those who ate less saturated fats and more “healthy” polyunsaturated fats did no better than those who substituted carbohydrates.

The association was dependent “on the chain length and food source of SFAs.”

The authors noted that the lower risk of IHD was driven by consumption of:

short-to-medium chain SFAs (myristic acid, the sum of pentadeclyic and margaric acids, and SFAs from dairy sources including butter, cheese, and milk and milk products.

Skeptics amongst my readers might think that this study was funded by the dairy industry, but as Marion Nestle pointed out on her Food Politics blog, support came from Unilever, who would have a vested interest in promoting their low saturated fat/high polyunsaturated fat margarines as substitutes for butter fat. This is only one of 11 industry-funded studies with findings different from what the sponsors would have liked, versus 105 studies with findings supporting products of the sponsors (since Marion has been tracking such studies).

It’s likely that some saturated fats, especially when eaten immoderately, without an otherwise balanced and diverse diet, can increase your risk of heart disease.

However, the saturated fats that come from dairy products are clearly not contributing to heart disease risk or obesity and our nutritional guidelines should recommend full fat dairy, not low fat or non fat products that require addition of added sugar to maintain palatability.

-Kind Regards

-ACP

 

 

Saturated Fat: Traditionalists versus Progressives

Why is death from coronary heart disease declining in the US at the same time that obesity and diabetes rates are climbing?

Two editorials recently published in The Lancet show the widely varying opinions on the optimal diet for controlling obesity , diabetes and coronary heart disease that experts on nutrition, diabetes and heart disease hold.

fats
Typical innocent and usual suspects rounded up in the war on fat: Cheese-data show it lower heart disease risk Full fat yogurt (Trader’s Point Creamery)-data show it is associated with lower heart disease risk Butter-Delicious. Used in moderation not a culprit.

The first paper contains what I would  consider the saturated fat “traditionalist” viewpoint. This is a modification of the misguided concept that was foisted on the American public in the 1980s and resulted in the widespread consumption of industrially produced trans-fats and high sugar junk food that was considered heart healthy.

The traditionalists have shifted from condemning all fats to vilifying only saturated and trans fats. They would like to explain at least part of the reduction in coronary heart mortality as due to lower saturated fat consumption and the accompanying lowering of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol.

The SFA traditionalists fortunately are in decline and more and more in the last five years, prominent thinkers, researchers and scientists working on the connection between diet and the heart believe saturated fats are neutral but sugar and refined carbohydrates are harmful in the diet.

Darius Mozzafarian, a highly respected cardiologist and epidemiologist, who is dean of the School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts, wrote the second editorial and is what I would term a saturated fatty acid (SFA) progressive.

He makes the following points which are extremely important to understand and which I have covered in previous posts. I’ve included his supporting references which can be accessed here.

Fat Doesn’t Make You Fat, Refined Starches And Sugar Do

"Foods rich in refined starches and sugars—not fats—seem to be the primary culprits for weight gain and, in turn, risk of type 2 diabetes. To blame dietary fats, or even all   calories, is incorrect
Although any calorie is energetically equivalent for short-term weight loss, a food's long-term obesogenicity is modified by its complex effects on satiety, glucose–insulin responses, hepatic fat synthesis, adipocyte function, brain craving, the microbiome, and even metabolic expenditure Thus, foods rich in rapidly digestible, low-fibre carbohydrates promote long-term weight gain, whereas fruits, non-starchy vegetables, nuts, yoghurt, fish, and whole grains reduce       long-term weight gain.123
Overall, increases in refined starches, sugars, and other ultraprocessed foods; advances in food industry marketing; decreasing physical activity and increasing urbanisation in developing nations; and possibly maternal–fetal influences and reduced sleep may be the main drivers of obesity and diabetes worldwide".

There Are Many Different Kinds of Saturated Fats With Markedly Different Health Effects: It Makes No Sense to Lump Them All Together 

"SFAs are heterogeneous, ranging from six to 24 carbon atoms and having dissimilar biology. For example, palmitic acid (16:0) exhibits in vitro adverse metabolic effects, whereas medium-chain (6:0–12:0), odd-chain (15:0, 17:0), and very-long-chain (20:0–24:0) SFAs might have metabolic benefits.4 This biological and metabolic diversity belies the wisdom of grouping of SFAs based on a single common chemical characteristic—the absence of double bonds. Even for any single SFA, physiological effects are complex: eg, compared with carbohydrate, 16:0 raises blood LDL cholesterol, while simultaneously raising HDL cholesterol, reducing triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and remnants, and having no appreciable effect on apolipoprotein B,  5 the most salient LDL-related characteristic. Based on triglyceride-lowering effects, 16:0 could also reduce apolipoprotein CIII, an important modifier of cardiovascular effects of LDL and HDL cholesterol. SFAs also reduce concentrations of lipoprotein(a) ,6 an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease."

The Effects of Dietary Saturated Fats Depend on Complex Interactions With The Other Ingredients in Food

"Dietary SFAs are also obtained from diverse foods, including cheese, grain-based desserts, dairy desserts, chicken, processed meats, unprocessed red meat, milk, yoghurt, butter, vegetable oils, and nuts. Each food has, in addition to SFAs, many other ingredients and characteristics that modify the health effects of that food and perhaps even its fats. Judging the long-term health effects of foods or diets based on macronutrient composition is unsound, often creating paradoxical food choices and product formulations. Endogenous metabolism of SFAs provide further caution against oversimplified inference: for example, 14:0 and 16:0 in blood and tissues, where they are most relevant, are often synthesised endogenously from dietary carbohydrate and correlate more with intake of dietary starches and sugars than with intake of meats and dairy.4"

Dietary Saturated Fat Should Not Be a Target for Health Promotion

"These complexities clarify why total dietary SFA intake has little health effect or relevance as a target. Judging a food or an individual's diet as harmful because it contains more SFAs, or beneficial because it contains less, is intrinsically flawed. A wealth of high-quality cohort data show largely neutral cardiovascular and metabolic effects of overall SFA intake.7 Among meats, those highest in processing and sodium, rather than SFAs, are most strongly linked to coronary heart disease.7Conversely, higher intake of all red meats, irrespective of SFA content, increases risk of weight gain and type 2 diabetes; the risk of the latter may be linked to the iron content of meats.28 Cheese, a leading source of SFAs, is actually linked to no difference in or reduced risk of coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes.910 Notably, based on correlations of SFA-rich food with other unhealthy lifestyle factors, residual confounding in these cohorts would lead to upward bias, causing overestimation of harms, not neutral effects or benefits. To summarise, these lines of evidence—no influence on apolipoprotein B, reductions in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and lipoprotein(a), no relation of overall intake with coronary heart disease, and no observed cardiovascular harm for most major food sources—provide powerful and consistent evidence for absence of appreciable harms of SFAs."

Dietary Saturated Fats May Raise LDL cholesterol But This Is Not Important: Overall Effects On Obesity and Atherosclerosis Are What Matters

"a common mistake made by SFA traditionalists is to consider only slices of data—for example, effects of SFAs on LDL cholesterol but not their other complex effects on lipids and lipoproteins; selected ecological trends; and expedient nutrient contrasts. Reductions in blood cholesterol concentrations in Western countries are invoked, yet without systematic quantification of whether such declines are explained by changes in dietary SFAs. For example, whereas blood total cholesterol fell similarly in the USA and France between 1980 and 2000, changes in dietary fats explain only about 20% of the decline in the US and virtually none of that which occurred in France.11Changes in dietary fats11 simply cannot explain most of the reductions in blood cholesterol in Western countries—even less so in view of the increasing prevalence of obesity. Medication use also can explain only a small part of the observed global trends in blood cholesterol and blood pressure. Whether decreases in these parameters are caused by changes in fetal nutrition, the microbiome, or other unknown pathways remains unclear, thus highlighting a crucial and greatly underappreciated area for further investigation."

Dietary Saturated Fats Are Neutral For Coronary heart Disease Risk

Finally, SFA traditionalists often compare the effects of SFAs only with those of vegetable polyunsaturated fats, one of the healthiest macronutrients. Total SFAs, carbohydrate, protein, and monounsaturated fat each seem to be relatively neutral for coronary heart disease risk, likely due to the biological heterogeneity of nutrients and foods within these macronutrient categories.7Comparisons of any of these broad macronutrient categories with healthy vegetable fats would show harm,12 so why isolate SFAs? Indeed, compared with refined carbohydrates, SFAs seem to be beneficial.7

The overall evidence suggests that total SFAs are mostly neutral for health—neither a major nutrient of concern, nor a health-promoting priority for increased intake. 

Focusing On Reducing Saturated Fats Leads To Unhealthy Dietary Choices

I’ve written about this a lot. The most baffling aspect of this is the promotion of low or non-fat dairy.

There is no evidence that low fat dairy products are  healthier than full fat dairy products.

Non-fat yogurt filled with sugar should be considered a dessert, not a healthy food.

"Continued focus on modifying intake of SFAs as a single group is misleading—for instance, US schools ban whole milk but allow sugar-sweetened skim milk; industry promotes low-fat foods filled with refined grains and sugars; and policy makers censure healthy nut-rich snacks because of SFA content.13 "

It is extremely hard to change most people’s opinions on dietary fat.

My patients have been hearing the SFA traditionalist dogma for decades and thus it has become entrenched in their minds.

When I present to them the new progressive and science-based approach to fat and saturated fat some find it so mind boggling that they become skeptical of the skeptical cardiologist!

Hopefully, in the next few years, the progressive SFA recommendations will become the norm and maybe , some day in the not too distant future, the inexplicable recommendations for low-fat or non fat dairy will disappear.

As more data accumulates we may become SFA enthusiasts!

Saturatingly Yours,

-ACP

For another viewpoint (?from an SFA enthusiast) and  a detailed description of both editorials see Axel Sigurdsson’s excellent post here.

Dietary Guidelines 2015: Why Lift Fat and Cholesterol Limits But Still Promote Low Fat Dairy?

When the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA2015) are finally issued they will likely follow the recommendations of the DGA committee. The DGA report (available here) has made giant strides in reversing four decades of bad advice coming from the government and the American Heart Association (AHA.)

Namely, as I discussed in detail here they no longer consider cholesterol a nutrient of concern and recommend lifting any specific limit on dietary cholesterol.

In addition, as a recent article in JAMA suggested  they have finally lifted  any recommended limit on percent daily intake of fat and we should celebrate and encourage this.

As we have pointed out multiple times, higher fat intake is not associated with heart disease or obesity and it makes no sense, therefore to impose limits on its consumption.

In fact, replacement of fat with carbohydrates is the worst dietary change you can make (with the exception of exchanging butter for industrial processed oils containing trans-fats).

Arguably, thanks to four decades of government and  AHA advice to cut fat and cholesterol we have seen the rise of sugar consumption and obesity as food manufacturers have agreeably made products that fulfill requirements for low fat but still taste good.

The new analysis and report from the DGAC 2015 will hopefully reverse this as they seem to have gotten most of the science right.

Non fat or Low-Fat Dairy Still Recommended

However, they have, inexplicably, left in recommendations for non-fat or low fat dairy.

As I have written about here and here there is no scientific evidence that supports the concept that dairy processed to remove dairy fat is healthier than the original unadulterated product.

In fact, evidence suggests full fat dairy reduces central obesity, diabetes and atherosclerosis in general.

It is virtually impossible in most grocery stores to find full fat yogurt or milk. The vast majority of the dairy aisle is devoted to various low or non fat concoctions which have had loads of sugar and chemicals added and are arguably worse than a Snickers bar.

Flawed Reasons for Low Fat Dairy Recommendations

I believe there are three reasons for this failure of the DGA 2015 and nutritional experts to correct the flawed advice to eat non or low-fat dairy over full fat:

1. In  few randomized dietary studies showing benefits of a particular diet over another, non fat or low fat dairy was recommended along with a portfolio of other healthy dietary changes.

The overall benefit of the superior diet had nothing to do with lowering the dairy fat but was due to multiple other changes.

2. The dairy industry has no motivation to promote full fat dairy. In fact, they do better financially when they can take the fat out of milk and sell it for other purposes such as butter, cheese, and cream.

3. Saturated fat is still mistakenly being treated as a monolithic nutritional element.  Although dairy fat is mostly saturated, the individual saturated fats vary widely in their effects on atherogenic lipids and atherosclerosis. In addition, the nature of the saturated fat changes depending on the diet of the cow.

If the DGA 2015 doesn’t get this issue right we risk another decade of the public consuming high sugar, low fat yogurt in the mistaken belief that they are engaging in healthy behavior.

-ACP

 

 

 

Trends in Fat and Yogurt Consumption: We Eat Less Fat yet Get Fatter

A recent paper in JAMA and a Seinfeld episode shed some light on the change in diet and fat consumption in Americans initiated by national nutritional recommendations beginning in the 1970s.

Based on weak to nonexistent scientific evidence Americans were told to consume less total fat and cut saturated fat consumption to less than 10% of calories.

The paper shows that women in the St. Paul-Minneapolis area  followed this advice and cut fat consumption as a % of total calories from 38.4% in 1980-1982 to 30.6% in 1995-1997. Saturated fatty acids dropped from 13.5 to 10.5%. (Since then, total fat % and SFA % has drifted slightly upward and calories downward )(for the full table see fat consumption table (PDF))

Media summaries and reports on this paper have emphasized that Americans have failed to cut their saturated fat consumption to meet recommendations of the USDA (<10%) and the American Heart Association (<6%) with a call for more promotion of these (mis)guidelines.

The skeptical cardiologist has a different take.

Interestingly total calories during these time intervals went up from 1645 to 1851. Thus, in replacement of the fat calories, the women were consuming the carbohydrates and sugars the food industry had obligingly added to food to make it more palatable,  “heart healthy” and comply with guidelines.

The authors discuss the fact that during these time intervals, despite slashing fat consumption,  overall rates of obesity substantially rose. Their explanation was that the women were “underreporting” fat consumption.

A simpler and more compelling explanation is that replacement of fat with carbohydrates along with overall increase in calorie consumption was the culprit.

The Non-Fat Yogurt Scam and Seinfeld

One ongoing contributor to the phenemon of replacing healthy real food fats with engineered, highly processed and highly sugared foods is the yogurt industry.

I wrote about the non fat yogurt scam about a year ago in this post.

I happened to see the fantastic Seinfeld episode “The Non-Fat Yogurt” last night . In this episode Jerry, Elaine and George eat at a non-fat frozen yogurt shop. Everyone concurs that the yogurt is surprisingly delicious given that it is “non-fat” and begin eating it regularly.  Jerry and Elaine gain weight  and begin suspecting that the yogurt is not truly “non-fat”.

This episode aired in 1993 during the height of the shift toward unhealthy low fat, processed substitutes.  An analysis of the yogurt revealed that it was not non-fat and this is why they were gaining weight. In reality,  people get fat on truly non-fat yogurt (even Greek Yogurt) and non-fat cookies and non-fat smoothies and  anything with added sugar.

Fat consumption doesn’t make you fat.

Enjoy this snippet from the episode (and please excuse the bad language)

 

Is A Snickers Bar Healthier Than Yoplait Yogurt?

This container of Yoplait comes from the refrigerator in the Doctor’s Lounge at my hospital. It is often the go-to snack for busy doctors and health conscious consumers.
I used to consider Yoplait about as healthy a snack as I could get. After all, it was low in fat, owned by French farmers and it had pictures of fruit on it. How could I go wrong?yoplait

In addition, Yoplait is focused on making “so good yogurt” as the company (now owned by General Mills) explains

“Ultimately, we’re focused on making so good yogurt, and here’s how we see it: you can eat something that tastes amazing but isn’t that good for you. You can eat stuff that’s really good for you, but doesn’t always leave you yummed up. So good yogurt does both. All of you is happy, not just your tongue. And while so goodness will never be perfect, we’ll keep working on ways to make our yogurt more so good than it is today.”

The significant other of the skeptical cardiologist (SOSC) made the claim recently that women who felt they were having a healthy lunch by consuming fat free yogurt and salad with sugary, fat-free salad dressing might as well be eating a candy bar. At least they would enjoy it more! Could this be true?

Yoplait made the bold step in 2012 of taking out the high fructose corn syrup they had been adding to their yogurt (or yoghurt as they like to spell it), but it’s still chock full of added sugar (which is probably why it leaves you “yummed up”)

What is now in “original” Yoplait?

Original Yoplait has 12 ingredients. They are Cultured pasteurized Grade A Low Fat Milk, Sugar, Blueberries, Modified Corn Starch, nonfat milk, kosher gelatin, citric acid, tricalcium phosphate, pectin, natural flavor colored with beet juice concentrate, Vitamin A and Vitamin D3.Yoplait_Original_Mountain-Blueberry

Indeed, the fat has been taken out but in its place – added sugar, 26 grams of sugar to be precise.

Of the 170 calories you are consuming, 104 of them are coming from sugar.

How healthy is a Snickers Bar?

snickers.jpgA regular-sized Snickers candy bar has a total of 280 calories with 13.6 grams of fat (5 grams saturated fat), 35 grams of carbohydrates (29 grams of sugar) and 4.3 grams of protein. It is made with peanuts, milk chocolate, egg whites and hydrogenated soybean oil. If we ate 2/3 of the bar to make the calories the same as the Yoplait, there would be 19 grams of sugar (compared to 26 for Yoplait) and 8 grams of fat.

A recent review of the cardiovascular effects of tree nuts and peanuts concluded:

there is impressive evidence from epidemiological and clinical trials and in vitro studies of beneficial effects of nut consumption and their constituents on the risk of CVD (cardiovascular disease), including sudden death, as well as on major and emerging CVD risk factors.

This is because in addition to a favorable fatty acid profile, nuts and peanuts contain other bioactive compounds that provide cardiovascular benefits. Other macronutrients include plant protein and fiber; micronutrients including potassium, calcium, magnesium, and tocopherols; and phytochemicals such as phytosterols, phenolic compounds, resveratrol, and arginine.


 

Curb your hunger.jpgSo, consuming 2/3 of a Snickers bar is arguably healthier than Yoplait. It contains peanuts, which have demonstrable benefits in lowering cardiovascular disease despite a high fat content. Yoplait has had the heart healthy dairy fat removed and replaced with added sugars. As I mentioned in a previous post, added sugar is clearly related to increased cardiovascular risk. The higher fat and fibre content of the peanuts in the Snickers bar will increase satiety and arguably be less likely to cause obesity due to rebound overeating later in the day.

A much healthier choice than low fat, added sugar products like Yoplait (and candy bars) is full fat, plain yogurt (preferably from grass-fed cows) as I’ve discussed in previous posts. It can be combined with real fruit or even with nuts. Full fat yogurt is surprisingly hard to find on a grocery shelf. Even at Whole Foods, the vast majority of yogurt and dairy products are low fat. I’ve only been able to find two brands, Supernatural and Trader’s Point Creamery, which consistently offer full fat yogurt.

Disclaimer and clarifications

godzilla.jpgI do not receive any payments from Snickers nor from Mars, Inc., one of the most known and beloved brands of chocolate.  I do not plan on seeing Godzilla, May 16. Although Snickers loves you, you do not need to like Snickers.snickersloves you.jpg